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Theresa May appointed UK's second female PM after David Cameron's formal resignation

'Title of my party is Conservative and Unionist Party and that word unionist is very important to me'

Theresa May has taken office as the UK's second female Prime Minister with the promise to create "a country that works for everyone".

Speaking outside the famous black door of 10 Downing Street, Mrs May said that the decisions of her administration would be driven not by the interests of "the privileged few" but those of voters struggling with the pressures of modern life.

Just minutes after being invited by the Queen to form a Government, the new Prime Minister stressed her determination to preserve the Union between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. And she promised she would "rise to the challenge" of negotiating exit from the European Union and forge a "bold new positive role" for Britain in the world.

But her strongest message was of her intention to serve as a "One Nation" Conservative PM acting on behalf of all voters, not just the Tories' traditional supporters in the comfortable suburbs and shires, and the world of business.

In a direct message to voters, she said: "I know you are working around the clock, I know you are doing your best and I know that sometimes life can be a struggle.

"The Government I lead will be driven not by the interests of the privileged few but by yours. We will do everything we can to give you more control over your lives."

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Theresa May's speech in full

Here is Theresa May's first speech as Prime Minister in full:

"I have just been to Buckingham Palace where Her Majesty the Queen has asked me to form a new Government and I accepted.

"In David Cameron I follow in the footsteps of a great modern Prime Minister.

"Under David's leadership the Government stabilised the economy, reduced the budget deficit and helped more people into work than ever before.

"But David's true legacy is not about the economy but about social justice.

"From the introduction of same sex marriage to taking people on low wages out of income tax altogether, David Cameron has led a One Nation government and it is in that spirit that I also plan to lead.

"Because not everybody knows this but the full title of my party is the Conservative and Unionist Party and that word unionist is very important to me.

"It means we believe in the union, the precious, precious bond between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland - but it means something else that is just as important.

"It means we believe in a union not just between the nations of the United Kingdom but between all of our citizens - every one of us - whoever we are and wherever we're from.

"That means fighting against the burning injustice that if you're born poor you will die on average nine years earlier than others.

"If you're black you are treated more harshly by the criminal justice system than if you're white.

"If you're a white working class boy you're less likely than anybody else in Britain to go to university.

"If you're at a state school you're less likely to reach the top professions than if you're educated privately.

"If you're a woman you will earn less than a man.

"If you suffer from mental health problems, there's not enough help to hand.

"If you're young you will find it harder than ever before to own your own home.

"But the mission to make Britain a country that works for everyone means more than fighting these injustices. If you're from an ordinary working class family, life is much harder than many people in Westminster realise."

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David Cameron formally resigns

David Cameron has formally resigned as prime minister in a private meeting with the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

The brief audience was due to be followed within minutes by the arrival of Theresa May to be appointed the UK's second female Prime Minister by "kissing hands" with the monarch.

The Queen's acceptance of Mr Cameron's resignation after six years in office came just minutes after he left 10 Downing Street for the last time as Prime Minister

Flanked by wife Samantha and children Nancy, Elwen and Florence outside the famous black door, Mr Cameron said that he believed he was leaving the country "much stronger" and the economy "immeasurably stronger" after his six years in office.

In a clear bid to define the legacy that he will leave behind him, he spoke of his pride at reducing the deficit, introducing gay marriage, increasing international aid spending and cutting waits for NHS treatment

And he paid tribute to his wife Samantha, who he described as "the love of my life" who had "kept me vaguely sane".

Mr Cameron said he was "delighted that for the second time in British history the new Prime Minister will be a woman, and once again a Conservative".

And he said Mrs May would provide "strong and stable leadership in delivering the Conservative manifesto on which we were elected" and wished her well in negotiating the withdrawal from the EU which voters backed in last month's referendum.

Mr Cameron concluded: "It has been the greatest honour of my life to serve our country as Prime Minister over these last six years and to serve as leader of my party over 11 years.

"And as we leave for the last time, my only wish is continued success for this great country that I love so very much."

David Cameron signs off as Prime Minister, urges Theresa May to keep UK 'as close to EU as we can'

David Cameron signed off as Prime Minister with advice for successor Theresa May that the UK should stay "as close to the European Union as we can".

After being forced out of the premiership by last month's referendum vote to quit the EU, Mr Cameron won a standing ovation from Conservative MPs as he ended his last session of Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons by telling them: "I was the future once."

But unlike the departure of Tony Blair, when Mr Cameron waved opposition MPs to their feet to applaud the outgoing Labour PM, Jeremy Corbyn and the majority of his team remained firmly seated on the green benches.

The bulk of the half-hour session was devoted to tributes to Cameron and jokes about the possibility of him filling current vacancies for England football manager, Top Gear host or a judge on Strictly Come Dancing.

And the outgoing PM had jokes of his own, taunting beleaguered Mr Corbyn by comparing him to Monty Python's Black Knight, who insisted on fighting on despite hacked-off limbs which he dismissed as a "flesh wound".

But Mr Cameron also sent a warning to Mrs May not to allow the Brexit vote to drive a wedge between the UK and its continental partners.

"My advice to my successor, who is a brilliant negotiator, is that we should try to be as close to the European Union as we can be - for the benefits of trade, of co-operation and of security," he said.

"The Channel will not get any wider once we leave the European Union, and that is the relationship we should seek."

Urged by veteran Tory Kenneth Clarke to remain an "active participant" as the House copes with the fallout from Brexit, Mr Cameron said: "I will watch these exchanges from the back benches. I will miss the roar of the crowd, I will miss the barbs from the opposition, but I will be willing you on."

Speaking of his pride at presiding over record employment, improved school standards, the introduction of gay marriage and lifting low-paid people out of income tax, Mr Cameron told MPs: "You can achieve a lot of things in politics ... In the end, public service, the national interest, that's what it's all about."

Watched from the public gallery by wife Samantha and children Nancy, Elwen and Florence, Mr Cameron paid tribute to the support he had received from his family, telling MPs: "The pressure often bears hardest on those around us in this job."

The outgoing PM is later expected to make a statement in Downing Street setting out what he sees as his legacy, before going to Buckingham Palace to offer his resignation to the Queen.

Mrs May will follow him to the Palace to be formally appointed his successor by "kissing hands" with the head of state, and is expected to make her first speech as PM outside the famous black door to Number 10, outlining her priorities for the new administration.

Britain's second female prime minister will swiftly begin drawing up her new top team and is expected to increase the number of women in government as well as appointing a Cabinet-rank minister at the head of a new Brexit department to oversee the process of withdrawal from the EU.

Although a Remain supporter, Mrs May has repeatedly stressed that "Brexit means Brexit" and the hunt for a building to house the department is already under way.

After presenting herself as the unity candidate, the incoming leader is expected to offer plum posts to leading figures from both camps in the EU referendum.

George Osborne looks unlikely to stay on as Chancellor after the PM-to-be trashed parts of his economic legacy in a campaign speech on Monday, with Philip Hammond, who has long coveted the role at the Treasury, among those who could take over.

Senior Brexiteer Chris Grayling will be rewarded for his role running Mrs May's campaign.

Andrea Leadsom, whose shock withdrawal from the leadership race meant the expected nine-week leadership campaign was truncated to just a couple of days, is expected to be offered a job in recognition of her raised profile.

Big question marks are hanging over the future of Brexit standard-bearers Boris Johnson and Michael Gove, who were seen to have blotted their copy-books in the wake of the referendum result.

Cameron and family leave Downing Street for last time

David Cameron has left 10 Downing Street for the last time as Prime Minister, as he set off on the short trip to Buckingham Palace to tender his resignation to the Queen and hand over the reins of power to Theresa May.

Flanked by wife Samantha and children Nancy, Elwen and Florence outside the famous black door, Mr Cameron said that he believed he was leaving the country "much stronger" and the economy "immeasurably stronger" after his six years in office.

In a clear bid to define the legacy that he will leave behind him, he spoke of his pride at reducing the deficit, introducing gay marriage, increasing international aid spending and reducing NHS waiting lists.

And he paid tribute to Samantha, who he described as "the love of my life" who had "kept me vaguely sane".

Mr Cameron said he was "delighted that for the second time in British history the new Prime Minister will be a woman, and once again a Conservative".

And he said Mrs May would provide "strong and stable leadership in delivering the Conservative manifesto on which we were elected" and wished her well in negotiating the withdrawal from the EU which voters backed in last month's referendum.

Mr Cameron concluded: "It has been the greatest honour of my life to serve our country as Prime Minister over these last six years and to serve as leader of my party over 11 years.

"And as we leave for the last time, my only wish is continued success for this great country that I love so very much."

Mr Cameron's audience with the Queen will be swiftly followed by the arrival at the Palace of Mrs May, who will be formally appointed the UK's second female Prime Minister by "kissing hands" with the monarch.

His departure came just hours after his final session of Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons, where he won a standing ovation from Conservative MPs after telling them: "I was the future once".

And he won laughter by telling MPs: "Other than one meeting this afternoon with Her Majesty the Queen, my diary for the rest of the day is remarkably light."

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