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Choccy-ár-lá? Easter Rising chocolate bar divides opinion

By Claire Cromie

Published 04/11/2015

Heatons' 1916 Easter Rising chocolate bar. Pic Justin Hourigan/Twitter
Heatons' 1916 Easter Rising chocolate bar. Pic Justin Hourigan/Twitter

An Irish department store has unveiled a chocolate bar to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising.

The bar, which bears images of the seven executed rebel leaders and the proclamation on its wrapper, is being sold in Heatons stores in the Republic for €3.

Twitter user Justin Hourigan shared a picture of the display in the Tralee branch, which was mocked as the "choclamation".

But while some people said it could help make Irish history accessible to children, others believe it is disrespectful and fear the centenary commemorations next year will become "overly commercialised".

James Connolly Heron, great-grandson of 1916 leader James Connolly, said: "There's so much more we can tell about the 1916 leaders than reducing them down to covering a chocolate bar."

He told RTE's Liveline it was important to educate younger generations about the Rising, but said the bar was "simply a commercial venture".

"One would expect a certain amount of sensitivity particularly around those that were executed," he said.

Fianna Fáil Wexford councillor Malcolm Byrne, who initially raised concerns about the bar, said the centenary must not be "overly commercialised".

Heatons has not responded to a request for a comment.

GPO in ruins 1916: Soldiers survey the interior of the post office in Sackville Street, Dublin, during the Easter Rising of 1916. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
GPO in ruins 1916: Soldiers survey the interior of the post office in Sackville Street, Dublin, during the Easter Rising of 1916. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Scene from O'Connell Street in Dublin, during the Easter Rising in 1916
Post Office Ruined...Soldiers inspect the interior of Dublin's General Post Office, viewing the complete destruction of the building after being shelled by the British during the Easter Rising 1916. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)...I
INDH28 Easter Rising 1916: British troops loading vehicle. Published 1920. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH22A Easter Rising 1916: Head office of ITGWU, destroyed following the 1916 Rising. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
Library pic dated 11/05/1916 of the damage wrought on Dublin's General Post Office during the Easter Rising.
INDH22C Easter Rising 1916: Ruins of Freeman Press and Telegraph, 1916. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
Easter Rising:Anniversary/Standard bearers head the parade into Milltown Cemetery, Falls Road, BELFAST, for the graveside ceremony. 12/4/1966
Library filer dated 11/05/1916 of a view of Sackville Street (O'Connell St) and the River Liffey at Eden Quay in Dublin, showing the devastation wrought during the Easter Rising.
GARDEN OF REMEMBERANCE OPENS FOR THE FIRST TIME IN APRIL 1966 IN CELEBRATION OF THE 50YRS ANNIVERSARY OF THE EASTER RISING
INDH29 Easter Rising 1916: British troops searching a car. Published 1920. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH22 Easter Rising 1916: Coliseum theatre, Henry Street, destroyed following the 1916 Rising. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH22B Easter Rising 1916: O'Connell bridge and street, 1916. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH22E Easter Rising 1916: Troops being marched to barracks, 1916. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH26 Easter Rising 1916: Troops searching bread van for arms. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH23 Easter Rising 1916: Troops inspecting car on Mount Street Bridge. Published 1916. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
INDH27 Easter Rising 1916: British troops barricade City Hall. Published 1920. (Part of the NPA/Independent Collection)
Easter Rising:Anniversary/Standard bearers head the parade into Milltown Cemetery, Falls Road, BELFAST, for the graveside ceremony. 12/4/1966

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