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Rockers U2 in mourning after tour boss Sheehan dies

By Catherine Wylie

Published 28/05/2015

‘Legend’: Dennis Sheehan
‘Legend’: Dennis Sheehan

U2 frontman Bono has described the band's long-standing tour manager as a "legend" who is "irreplaceable" following his death.

Dennis Sheehan, who is believed to have been the rock group's tour manager for more than 30 years, was aged in his late 60s.

In a tribute, Bono said: "We've lost a family member, we're still taking it in. He wasn't just a legend in the music business, he was a legend in our band. He is irreplaceable."

Arthur Fogel, CEO at Global Touring and chairman at Global Music Live Nation Global Touring, said: "With profound sadness we confirm that Dennis Sheehan, U2's long-standing tour manager and dear friend to us all, has passed away overnight.

"Our heartfelt sympathy is with his wonderful family." U2 are in the middle of their latest world tour Innocence & Experience and are currently doing a string of shows in Los Angeles.

Mr Sheehan died in his room at the Sunset Marquis Hotel in West Hollywood.

Los Angeles County Fire Inspector Chris Reade said first responders were called at around 5.30am local time to reports of a man in cardiac arrest. Mr Sheehan was pronounced dead at the scene.

Coroner's investigators are at the hotel.

Mr Sheehan has managed U2's tours for more than three decades. Bono said he "was a legend in our band. He is irreplaceable".

The Irish quartet brought their Innocence & Experience tour to The Forum in Inglewood, California, on Tuesday, the first of five nights in the Los Angeles area.

It was launched earlier this month in Vancouver, Canada, the North American and European tour continues until November 15.

Born in Wolverhampton in the UK, Mr Sheehan also worked with Led Zeppelin, Iggy Pop and Lou Reed.

He was previously awarded the Parnelli Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008 for his work in the music industry throughout four decades.

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