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Architect of hated poll tax faced fine for form faux pas

By Gavin Gordon

Margaret Thatcher was threatened with a fine for failing to register for the poll tax, despite making it her flagship local government reform.

The former Prime Minister was warned she would be in breach of the law unless she completed her registration form.

The embarrassing oversight - due in part to a bureaucratic wrangle between the Cabinet Office and Westminster City Council- was quickly rectified, but it marked an inauspicious start for a measure widely regarded as the biggest policy blunder of her 11 years in power - one which finally cost her the premiership.

In early 1989, as the political storm was gathering strength, Westminster City Council - like other authorities around the country - began issuing registration forms in preparation for the launch of the tax in England and Wales the following year.

One form covering the various residencies in and around Downing Street - including No 10, which Mrs Thatcher (above) and her husband Denis had nominated as their main home - was sent to the Treasury.

But the Cabinet Office complained that it was "most inappropriate" to issue a single form "asking a number of essentially personal questions" on behalf of individual occupants.

Individual forms were then despatched, but when there were still no details forthcoming, the council registration officer, David J Hopkins, warned he would be forced to act.

In a letter dated May 22, 1989, he said: "My records show that the Community Charge Registration form recently sent to you has not been returned.

"I wish to advise that you are required by law to supply the relevant information within 21 days of this request and failure to do so may lead to a penalty being imposed."

The letter was addressed to the 'Resident/Owner' at 'Rooms First Floor, 10 Downing Street, London W1 9MN'.

Officials quickly arranged for the Prime Minister to complete the form, only to discover the council had sent the wrong one and she had to do it all again.

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