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Cameron pledges Tory councils fight

David Cameron has called for a "flat-out full-throttle fight" by Conservative activists for local council elections taking place on May 3.

In an appeal to the party to fight hard outside its heartlands in the south of England, Mr Cameron said the Tories are "the proud party of this one nation", able to speak for voters in every part of Britain.

Launching the Conservative local election campaign in Derbyshire, Mr Cameron told activists: "Now is not the time to put our feet up. It's time to roll our sleeves up.

"We don't need a sort-of strategy, or a kind-of campaign. We need a flat-out, full-throttle fight."

He added: "You want a better future for your children - that is what the Conservatives are creating; You understand what's right for this country - and so do we. That's what we need to tell people."

Voting takes place in 181 councils in England, Scotland and Wales on May 3, alongside ballots for mayors in London, Liverpool and Salford and the London Assembly - and referendums on the creation of directly-elected mayors in several cities.

Nationally, the Government is taking action to revive house-building, reform schools and control immigration after the "complete and utter disaster" of the previous Labour administration, he said.

"Let's tell everyone this," said Mr Cameron. "If you're sick of the status quo, if you're tired of being told that this is the best you can hope for, if you want leadership that admires and encourages those who want the best for themselves and their families, if you want real change, if you want a radical alternative, you know who to vote for."

Speaking to around 150 activists at a community centre in Riddings, near Alfreton, Mr Cameron urged Tory activists to "shine a spotlight" on Labour waste ahead of the May 3 polls.

Tory activists were also urged by the party leader to shout about their record in Government, which he said gave "every single person" a reason to vote Conservative.

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