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Camilla visits Plaisterer's guild

Published 27/05/2015

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall listen to the Quuen's Speech in the House of Lords during the State Opening of Parliament
The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall listen to the Quuen's Speech in the House of Lords during the State Opening of Parliament

The Duchess of Cornwall has joked that she was unable to get a good view of the Queen's Speech today.

She made the comments during a visit to the Worshipful Company of Plaisterers, a trade guild of which she is an Honorary Liveryman.

Sitting at the Prince of Wales's side during the State Opening of Parliament, Camilla looked over the House of Lords gallery, rather than towards the Queen.

While she mingled with guests at the reception at Plaisterer's Hall in central London, one person asked if she was tired after her day in Westminster.

She responded: "Did you see it? I couldn't get a good view."

Earlier, Camilla made a quip about the pronunciation of plaisterers - an archaic spelling of plasterers - during a speech to the guild.

Having spoken of her pride at being involved with the organisation, the Duchess added that she was happy to be there "in the company of plaisterers, or plasterers".

She was presented with a brooch designed by 19-year-old Joshua Gane, whose work had won a competition run by the Plaisterers and the Goldsmith's Company.

The design was labelled a "masterpiece" by Camilla, who commended 10 other design students on their efforts.

Mr Gane said it was an "immense honour" to have the Duchess as a "client" and for his work to be recognised.

He said: "I wanted to make the design simple, but elegant.

"When I found out I had won, I was called to the design room and all of the plasterers were around. I thought I hadn't won, but I was told I had and I was overjoyed.

"It was an immense honour - it's great to have her as a client."

The Worshipful Company of Plaisterers was granted its Royal Charter by King Henry VII in 1501 and still supports the plastering trade through bursaries, training and apprenticeships.

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