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David Cameron: Hard military force needed against Assad and Isis in Syria

Published 09/09/2015

Syria: Spending money on humanitarian aid and taking in refugees is not enough, the Prime Minister said (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)
Syria: Spending money on humanitarian aid and taking in refugees is not enough, the Prime Minister said (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

President Assad and Isis must both be defeated by "hard military force," David Cameron has said in his strongest signal yet that Britain will soon bomb Syria.

The Prime Minister said the UK will do "all we can" to help the humanitarian crisis stemming from the four-year civil war in Syria but said spending money on aid and taking in refugees would not be enough on its own to bring peace to the country.

"We can do all we can as the moral, humanitarian nation at taking people and spending money on aid and helping in refugee camps," Mr Cameron told MPs at Prime Minister's Questions.

"But we have to be part of the international alliance that says we need an approach in Syria which will mean we have a government that can look after its people.

"Assad has to go, Isil has to go and some of that will require not just spending money, not just aid, not just diplomacy, but it will on occasion require hard military force."

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Cameron defeated on Syria vote  

He revealed on Monday that an RAF drone attack had already been launched against Isis targets in Syria, killing two British jihadist fighters last month.

It was an unprecedented step - the first time British nationals had been killed by the RAF in a foreign country.

Mr Cameron defended acting without Parliamentary backing, saying the Government had decided to act on intelligence showing the men had plotted several terror attacks in Britain.

But wider military intervention in Syria would need the approval of MPs. Plans to bomb President Assad's regime in 2013 were rejected by the Commons, but ministers believe it is time for Parliament to think again about airstrikes in Syria.

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