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Fatherhood has made me more emotional, says Prince William

By Tony Jones

Published 04/01/2016

The Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry with Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly
The Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry with Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly
McPartlin with the Duchess of Cornwall
Princess Charlotte and Prince George

The Duke of Cambridge has confessed that fatherhood has made him more "emotional" and prone to welling up, during a documentary about his father's Prince's Trust.

William is the proud father of two small children - Prince George and Princess Charlotte - and has discovered that becoming a parent has made him more aware of how "precious life is".

Speaking to Ant and Dec with his brother Prince Harry beside him, William said of the changes fatherhood had brought: "I'm a lot more emotional than I used to be, weirdly. I never used to get too wound up or worried about things.

"But now the smallest little things, you well up a little more, you get affected by the sort of things that happen around the world or whatever a lot more, I think, as a father.

"Just because you realise how precious life is, and it puts it all in perspective. The idea of not being around to see your children grow up and stuff like that."

The Duchess of Cornwall has also given what is believed to be her first televised interview for the 90-minute programme presented by Ant and Dec - Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly - who are Trust ambassadors.

Camilla praised the Prince of Wales during the documentary for setting up his Prince's Trust 40 years ago and said he was still "passionate" about helping young people.

The Trust grew out of Charles's concern that too many young people were being excluded from society through a lack of opportunity.

In 1976, when he left the Royal Navy, he used the £7,400 he received in severance pay to fund a number of community schemes. These early initiatives were the founding projects of his charity.

Around the country, 21 pilot projects were set up - from a grant given to a 19-year-old woman to run a social centre for the Haggerston housing estate in east London, to funds used to hire swimming baths in Cornwall to train young lifeguards. During the past 40 years it has grown to become Britain's leading youth charity and has reached more than 825,000 young people in total, with three in four achieving a positive outcome.

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