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List of suspects over Paris massacres

Published 20/11/2015

People gather at a makeshift memorial for a tribute to the victims of a series of deadly attacks in Paris, in front of the Carillon cafe on rue Bichat and rue Alibert in Paris on November 20, 2015. AFP PHOTO/THOMAS SAMSON/Getty Images.
People gather at a makeshift memorial for a tribute to the victims of a series of deadly attacks in Paris, in front of the Carillon cafe on rue Bichat and rue Alibert in Paris on November 20, 2015. AFP PHOTO/THOMAS SAMSON/Getty Images.

Here are details of the suspects thought to be behind last Friday's massacres that left 130 dead in Paris:

:: A woman who died during the dramatic police shoot-out on Wednesday was Hasna Aitboulahcen, the cousin of "mastermind" Abdelhamid Abaaoud.

It was initially thought that she blew herself up during the gunfight, but Paris prosecutors have confirmed she was killed in the police raid but was not a suicide bomber. A third person killed in the Saint-Denis siege is as yet unidentified.

Aitboulahcen, 26, is said to have been radicalised just a matter of months ago.

The former construction worker was reportedly born in the northern Paris suburb of Clichy-la-Garenne to Moroccan parents before going into foster care.

After a troubled upbringing she began to abuse drink and drugs, but turned to extremist Islam earlier this year, according to some.

Friends claim Aitboulahcen socialised in Paris nightclubs and was known for her unique style, favouring cowboy hats.

But earlier this year she abandoned Western dress for the niqab and made a number of posts on Facebook with an extremist tone before making an abortive attempt to travel to Syria, it is claimed.

:: Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian national, was identified by French officials as the presumed mastermind of the co-ordinated attacks.

The Islamic State (IS) jihadi, 27, was linked to a thwarted attack on a high-speed train in August which was stopped as it sped towards Paris when passengers overpowered a gunman, and an attack on a church in the Paris area.

Abaaoud grew up in the Brussels suburb of Molenbeek, which has emerged as a key focus of investigations into the Paris atrocity. He is said to have recruited his 13-year-old brother to join him in Syria and become one of IS's youngest fighters.

Abaaoud is well known to followers of IS and last year a video emerged of him and friends loading a pick-up truck and a trailer with a pile of bloody bodies.

His whereabouts were unknown after the attack, with the IS magazine Dabiq suggesting he escaped to Syria earlier this year.

The Paris prosecutor's office confirmed that Abaaoud was killed in the operation after using skin samples to verify the identity of his corpse.

:: An international manhunt is continuing for Salah Abdeslam, 26, who rented a car used to carry gunmen to the Bataclan music venue in Paris.

The French authorities missed an opportunity to detain him and two other men near the Belgian border hours after the attacks.

The arrest warrant describes Abdeslam, a Frenchman born in Brussels, as very dangerous and warns people not to intervene if they see him.

:: Brahim Abdeslam, Salah's elder brother, was named by a judicial source in France as one of the attackers.

The 31-year-old was identified by police as the suicide bomber who blew himself up on Boulevard Voltaire

Another brother, Mohamed Abdeslam, was released without charge on Monday after he was detained at the weekend.

:: Samy Amimour was one of the suicide bombers who blew himself up at the Bataclan music hall, the Paris prosecutor's office said. A 28-year-old Frenchman, he was known to French intelligence services but apparently slipped through the security net.

He was charged with terror offences in 2012 over an attempted trip to Yemen and terror network links, but disappeared the following year. He is thought to have joined up with IS in Syria and an international arrest warrant was issued for him.

Amimour lived at home and had briefly worked as a bus driver, and his father Mohamed told France's Le Monde newspaper he had travelled to land held by IS last year to try to persuade his son to leave Syria, but failed.

Three members of Amimour's family were arrested on Monday, French prosecutors said.

:: A suicide bomber who blew himself up outside the Stade de France, the country's national sports stadium, was found with a Syrian passport with the name Ahmad Al Mohammad.

It describes a 25-year-old born in Idlib, a rebel-held city in north-west Syria, and the Paris prosecutor's office said fingerprints from the attacker match those of a person who travelled through Greece last month.

Greek officials said someone bearing Al Mohammad's passport was processed on the island of Leros, having arrived there from Turkey. He stayed on the island for five days before travelling to Athens by ship, where authorities stopped tracking him.

It is unclear whether the passport belongs to the attacker.

:: Omar Ismael Mostefai, 29, was previously flagged for links to Islamic radicalism and was named by police after being identified through remains found at the Bataclan music hall.

It was claimed that Turkish authorities identified him as a possible terror suspect in October last year, flagging him up to their French counterparts two months later and again in June this year.

He lived with his family in the French city of Chartres and French police officials believe he travelled to Syria in the past few years before he was placed under increased surveillance.

:: Another suicide bomber was named as Bilal Hadfi, thought to be 20, one of three who attacked the Stade de France. He is said to have fought with IS in Syria.

On Thursday, Belgian authorities launched six raids in the Brussels area linked to Hadfi.

:: Mohammed Amri, 27, and Hamza Attou, 21, have been named as the alleged getaway drivers, according to reports. They are said to be under investigation as potential suppliers of the suicide bombs used in Friday's attacks.

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