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Men making themselves depressed by eating too much sugar, study suggests

The study ruled out the possibility that unhappy men comforting themselves with sugary treats caused the results.

Millions of sweet-toothed British men could be making themselves anxious and depressed by consuming too much sugar, a study suggests.

Scientists found that men who consumed more than 67 grams of sugar per day increased their risk of mood disorders by more than a fifth compared with those with an intake of less than 39.5 grams.

Since the average British man has a 68.4 gram per day sugar habit, the findings do not bode well for the mental health of the UK male population.

The study ruled out the possibility that the results can be explained by unhappy men comforting themselves with sugary treats.

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File photo dated 22/7/15 of an orange carbonated drink surrounded by sugar cubes, as sugary drinks will be banned from hospital shops next year unless action is taken to cut their sales, NHS England has announced.

Lead researcher Dr Anika Knuppel, from University College London’s Institute of Epidemiology and Health, said: “High sugar diets have a number of influences on our health but our study shows that there might also be a link between sugar and mood disorders, particularly among men.

“There are numerous factors that influence chances for mood disorders, but having a diet high in sugary foods and drinks might be the straw that breaks the camel’s back.

“There is increasing evidence for the physical damage sugar has on our health. Our work suggests an additional mental health effect.”

For reasons that are unclear, the study which looked at thousands of civil servants of both sexes found no link between sugar intake and new mood disorders in women.

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The study ruled out the possibility that the results can be explained by unhappy men comforting themselves with sugary treats (Anthony Devlin/PA)

The findings are based on data from Whitehall II, a major long-term investigation into physical and mental health problems encountered by people working at different levels of the UK civil service.

Sugar consumption was compared with rates of common mental disorders in more than 5,000 men and 2,000 women between 1983 and 2013.

Participants were placed into three groups according to their daily sugar intake. After five years, men in the top group were 23% more like to have developed a common mental disorder such as depression or anxiety than those in the bottom group. The top tier men consumed more than 67g of sugar per day and the bottom group less than 39.5g.

British adults consume roughly double recommended levels of added sugar.

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Adults consume double the recommended intake of the sweet stuff (Tim Goode/PA)

Experts commenting on the research urged caution, which appears in the journal Scientific Reports.

Catherine Collins, from the British Dietetic Association, said: “Whilst the findings as reported are interesting, the dietary analysis makes it impossible to justify the bold claims made by the researchers about sugar and depression in men.

“Reducing intake of free sugars is good for your teeth, and may be good for your weight, too. But as protection against depression? It’s not proven.”

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