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Name 'Londonderry' could disappear under Boundary Commission proposals for Northern Ireland

Published 06/09/2016

The proposed changes to the Northern Ireland boundaries.
The proposed changes to the Northern Ireland boundaries.
How Belfast could be represented.

The name of Northern Ireland's second city, Londonderry, could disappear under new proposals governing parliamentary constituency boundaries.

The Boundary Commission has announced radical proposals to the formation of constituency profiles across Northern Ireland.

If given the go-ahead it will see the number of MPs reduced from 18 to 17 under the UK wide proposals to cut the size of the House of commons from 650 to 600.

More: Boundary reform will see sweeping changes to political landscape in Northern Ireland

Under the proposals Belfast is set to be reduced to just three constituencies from four.

Four other constituencies are to disappear with six new constituencies created.

They are provisionally called Dalriada, Glenshane, North Tyrone, Upper Bann and Blackwater, West Antrim and West Down.

Meaning the name Londonderry could disappear.

The current constituency of East Londonderry will become part of Glenshane with Foyle representing Derry city.

The Commissions' proposals fall within the now-legal requirement that each constituency has an electorate of between 71,031 and 78,507.

The proposals are now out for public consultation until November 28 with four public hearings planned during October in Ballymena, Omagh, Belfast and Portadown, to allow voters have their say.

The Boundary Commission will then issue revised proposals late next year, after which there is a further eight-week consultation before the final recommendations are made to the Secretary of State in 2018.


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