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Parole Board recommends open prison for road-rage killer Kenneth Noye

The 70-year-old was convicted of killing Stephen Cameron in 1996.

Road-rage killer Kenneth Noye has been recommended for transfer to an open prison, the Parole Board said.

Noye, now 70, was convicted of murder in April 2000 and sentenced to life with a minimum term of 16 years, after stabbing 21-year-old electrician Stephen Cameron to death in an attack on the M25 in Kent in 1996.

The board’s recommendation comes after Noye won a High Court challenge in February against a decision refusing him a move to open prison conditions.

A Parole Board spokesman said: “We can confirm that a three-member panel of the Parole Board has not directed the release of Kenneth Noye.

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Stephen Cameron with his girlfriend Danielle Cable (PA/PA Archive)

“However, they have recommended that he be transferred to open conditions.

“This is a recommendation only and the Ministry of Justice will now consider the advice and make the final decision.

“Under current legislation, Mr Noye will be eligible for a further review within two years.

“The date of the next review will be set by the Ministry of Justice.”

In September 2015 the Parole Board declined to order Noye’s release and recommended he be transferred to an open prison.

But the recommendation was rejected by then justice secretary Michael Gove on November 5 2015.

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Former justice secretary Michael Gove refused to allow Kenneth Noye a transfer to an open prison in November 2015 (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Following a High Court challenge by Noye earlier this year, Mr Justice Lavender quashed the refusal decision.

He said in February: “It will be for the current Secretary of State to take a fresh decision whether or not to transfer the claimant to an open prison.”

Edward Fitzgerald QC, for Noye, had argued the rejection decision was “unlawful and irrational”.

But the judicial review challenge was contested by former justice secretary Liz Truss, who said there was “nothing irrational” in the decision taken.

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