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Quadruple amputee Jamie Andrew hits new heights

By Laura Paterson

Published 10/08/2016

Jamie Andrew (centre) with two seasoned guides from the International School of Mountaineering at the top of the Matterhorn. Photo: PA Wire
Jamie Andrew (centre) with two seasoned guides from the International School of Mountaineering at the top of the Matterhorn. Photo: PA Wire
Jamie Andrew is thought to be the first quadruple amputee to climb the Swiss mountain. Photo: David Cheskin/PA Wire

A British mountaineer who lost his hands and feet after suffering severe frostbite is thought to be the first quadruple amputee to climb Switzerland's Matterhorn.

Jamie Andrew (47), from Edinburgh, scaled the 14,692ft Alpine summit using prosthetic legs and specially adapted poles.

He was stranded in a storm when completing the North Face of Les Droites in the French Alps at the height of his climbing career in 1999.

After being rescued from the mountain, his hands and feet were amputated. His climbing partner Jamie Fisher died.

Within three and a half months, Mr Andrew was walking again and he turned to skiing and long-distance running before returning to mountaineering.

He spent five years training before attempting to reach the Alpine summit last Thursday with two seasoned guides from the International School of Mountaineering - having never climbed the mountain before.

He said: "It's something that I never really dreamt would be possible, then I started to dream it would be possible, took it one step at a time and eventually got there."

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