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Tunisia attack: tributes paid to UK and Irish victims as bodies are repatriated

Published 01/07/2015

The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)

All but one of the 30 Britons believed killed in the Tunisian beach massacre have been formally identified, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said after the first bodies were repatriated to the UK.

Speaking after chairing a meeting of the Government's emergency Cobra committee, he said the others would be brought home "over the coming days".

Relatives wept and comforted each other as the C-17 military transport aircraft, which left Tunis airport earlier today, landed at Brize Norton in Oxfordshire.

The coffins of Adrian Evans, Patrick Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites were adorned with white flowers and were carried off the plane by members of the armed forces.

They were among the 38 people shot dead by student Seifeddine Rezgui, 23, at the beach resort of Sousse on Friday.

"I can confirm that the number of Britons killed in the Tunisia terrorist attack who have been positively identified has now reached 29," Mr Hammond said.

"One victim now remains who we believe is British but police require further time to confirm the identity.

"All of our injured are home and all bar one of the 30 who we believe are British have now been positively identified. The first RAF flight to repatriate the bodies of those killed in the attack returned eight of the victims to their loved ones.

"The remaining bodies will be flown back to Britain over the coming days."

The repatriation process of all the victims is expected to take a number of days.

Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach in Sousse, where 38 people were killed in last Fridays terror attack on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach in Sousse, where 38 people were killed in last Fridays terror attack on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Composite of photograph of six of the British victims of the Tunisia beach massacre who are being returned to the UK. Top row from left, Adrian Evans, Patrick Evans and Joel Richards. Bottom row from left, Carly Lovett, Elaine and Denis Thwaites
Undated handout photos issued by West Yorkshire Police of Christopher and Sharon Bell, who died in the Tunisia beach massacre
Joel Richards who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
David Thompson who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Undated handout photo issued by West Midlands Police of Patrick Evans who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Adrian Evans who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Joel Richards who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Patrick Evans who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Undated handout photo issued by Northumbria Police of Lisa Burbidge, a grandmother from Whickham, Gateshead, who was among the British and Irish citizens who died in the Tunisia beach massacre
Undated handout photo issued by Northumbria Police of Lisa Burbidge, a grandmother from Whickham, Gateshead, who was among the British and Irish citizens who died in the Tunisia beach massacre
Tributes remain on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, following the terror attacks on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 1, 2015. The number of British tourists killed in the Tunisia terrorist attack who have been positively identified has reached 29, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said. See PA POLICE Tunisia stories. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Tributes remain on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, following the terror attacks on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 1, 2015. The number of British tourists killed in the Tunisia terrorist attack who have been positively identified has reached 29, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said. See PA POLICE Tunisia stories. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Tributes remain on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, following the terror attacks on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 1, 2015. The number of British tourists killed in the Tunisia terrorist attack who have been positively identified has reached 29, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said. See PA POLICE Tunisia stories. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
The coffin of John Stollery is taken from the RAF C-17 carrying the bodies of eight British nationals killed in the Tunisia terror attack at RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday July 1, 2015. The bodies of eight Britons killed by the gunman will be returned to the UK today. It comes as the names of two more people who died in the attack emerged, following a statement from their family. The first RAF flights left Britain early this morning and will carry the bodies back to Brize Norton, with the repatriation process expected to take a number of days. See PA story POLICE Tunisia. Photo credit should read: Joe Giddens/PA Wire
Flowers laid on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, as British holidaymakers defy the terrorists and continue to stay in Sousse despite the bloodbath on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The sands at Sousse were quiet and calm today as tourists and locals alike continued to pay their respects to the 38 dead outside the RIU Imperial Marhaba and Bellevue hotels. Flowers continue to be laid at three heart-shaped memorials that mark where so many people lost their lives, with many people in tears as they read the messages of support in several languages that have been placed in the sand. See PA POLICE Tunisia stories. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
A message left on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, as British holidaymakers defy the terrorists and continue to stay in Sousse despite the bloodbath on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The sands at Sousse were quiet and calm today as tourists and locals alike continued to pay their respects to the 38 dead outside the RIU Imperial Marhaba and Bellevue hotels. Flowers continue to be laid at three heart-shaped memorials that mark where so many people lost their lives, with many people in tears as they read the messages of support in several languages that have been placed in the sand. See PA POLICE Tunisia stories. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
A man jumps into the water at a beach in Sidi Bou Said, on the outskirts of the capital Tunis, on July 1, 2015, a few days after a deadly attack on tourists in Port El Kantaoui by a jihadists gunman. Tunisia said it started deploying armed police around tourist sites after last week's massacre at a beach resort, as authorities finished identifying all 38 foreigners killed in the jihadist attack. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Tunisian security forces patrol a beach in Sousse, south of the capital Tunis, on July 1, 2015, as Tunisia started deploying armed police around tourist sites following last week's massacre in Port El Kantaoui by a jihadists gunman. Tunisian authorities vowed new heightened security measures, including 1,000 armed officers to reinforce tourism police -- who will be armed for the first time -- at hotels, beaches and other attractions. AFP PHOTO / BECHIR TAIEBBECHIR TAIEB/AFP/Getty Images
The coffin of Charles Patrick Evans is carried off a Royal Air Force C-17 military transporter plane at RAF Brize Norton after it landed with the coffins of eight of thirty Britons killed in last week's Jihadist attack in Tunisia on July 1, 2015. The death toll among Britons was the worst loss of life for Britain in a jihadist attack since the July 2005 bombings in London. AFP PHOTO / POOL / JOE GIDDENSJoe Giddens/AFP/Getty Images
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of Elaine Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of John Stollery, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of John Stollery, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: A close-up view of a coffin as a funeral cortege carrying the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack in Tunisia drives through the village of Brize Norton after arriving at the nearby RAF airbase on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The coffin of Adrian Evans, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
BRIZE NORTON, ENGLAND - JULY 01: The RAF C17 aircraft lands at RAF Brize Norton carrying the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack in Tunisia, on July 1, 2015 in Brize Norton, England. British nationals Adrian Evans, Charles Evans, Joel Richards, Carly Lovett, Stephen Mellor, John Stollery, and Denis and Elaine Thwaites are the first of the victims of last week's terror attack to be repatriated. (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
TUNIS, TUNISIA - JULY 01: Ambulances carrying the victim's of last Friday's terrorist attack arrive at Tunis Airport where they will be flown back to Brize Norton on an RAF C17 aircraft on July 1, 2015 in Tunis, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area to assist in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
TUNIS, TUNISIA - JULY 01: An RAF C17 aircraft bound for Brize Norton takes off from Tunis Airport carrying the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, on July 1, 2015 in Tunis, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area to assist in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
TUNIS, TUNISIA - JULY 01: Ambulances carrying the victim's of last Friday's terrorist attack arrive at Tunis Airport where they will be flown back to Brize Norton on an RAF C17 aircraft on July 1, 2015 in Tunis, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area to assist in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
People lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
A hooded Tunisian police officer stands guard as British Home Secretary Theresa May, right, Tunisian Interior Minister Mohamed Najem Gharsalli, 2nd right, and French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, left, pay respect to the victims of Friday's shooting attack on the beach in front of the Imperial Marhaba hotel in the Mediterranean resort of Sousse, Tunisa, Monday, June 29, 2015. Seven people are being interrogated in Tunisia's capital in the investigation into a deadly beach resort attack that killed 38 people, according to a person with knowledge of the investigation. (AP Photo/Abdeljalil Bounhar)
A hooded Tunisian police officer stands guard ahead of the visit of top security officials of Britain, France, Germany and Belgium at the scene of Friday's shooting attack in front of the Imperial Marhaba hotel in the Mediterranean resort of Sousse, Tunisa, Monday, June 29, 2015. The top security officials of Britain, France, Germany and Belgium are paying homage to the people killed in the terrorist attack on Friday. (AP Photo/Abdeljalil Bounhar)
Tourists look at flowers that have been laid on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, as British holidaymakers defy the terrorists and continue to stay in Sousse despite the bloodbath on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The sands at Sousse were quiet and calm today as tourists and locals alike continued to pay their respects to the 38 dead outside the RIU Imperial Marhaba and Bellevue hotels. Flowers continue to be laid at three heart-shaped memorials that mark where so many people lost their lives, with many people in tears as theyy read the messages of support in several languages that have been placed in the sand. See PA story POLICE Tunisia Tourists. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Tourists look at flowers that have been laid on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, as British holidaymakers defy the terrorists and continue to stay in Sousse despite the bloodbath on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The sands at Sousse were quiet and calm today as tourists and locals alike continued to pay their respects to the 38 dead outside the RIU Imperial Marhaba and Bellevue hotels. Flowers continue to be laid at three heart-shaped memorials that mark where so many people lost their lives, with many people in tears as theyy read the messages of support in several languages that have been placed in the sand. See PA story POLICE Tunisia Tourists. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Tourists look at flowers that have been laid on the beach near the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, as British holidaymakers defy the terrorists and continue to stay in Sousse despite the bloodbath on the beach. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The sands at Sousse were quiet and calm today as tourists and locals alike continued to pay their respects to the 38 dead outside the RIU Imperial Marhaba and Bellevue hotels. Flowers continue to be laid at three heart-shaped memorials that mark where so many people lost their lives, with many people in tears as theyy read the messages of support in several languages that have been placed in the sand. See PA story POLICE Tunisia Tourists. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
A British family, who witnessed the beach massacre by a jihadists gunman the previous week, mourn as they lay flowers at the site of the attack on the beach in front of the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel in Port el Kantaoui, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis, on June 30, 2015. Tunisia's President Beji Caid Essebsi has admitted security services were not prepared for the beach attack, as authorities warned the country is likely to lose more than half-a-billion dollars in tourism revenues. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Tourists take part in a gathering in solidarity with Tunisia's tourism industry, on June 29, 2015 on the island of Djerba, following a deadly gun attack at a holiday resort near Sousse. Tunisia said it had made its first arrests after a beach massacre on June 26 that killed 38 people, as European officials paid tribute to victims of the country's worst jihadist attack. AFP PHOTO / FETHI NASRIFETHI NASRI/AFP/Getty Images
A tourist with the Tunisian flag painted on her face takes part in a gathering in solidarity with Tunisia's tourism industry, on June 29, 2015 on the island of Djerba. Tunisia said it had made its first arrests after a beach massacre that killed 38 people, as European officials paid tribute to victims of the country's worst jihadist attack. AFP PHOTO / FETHI NASRIFETHI NASRI/AFP/Getty Images
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Armed police continue to patrol Marhaba beach in Sousse, where 38 people were killed in last Fridays terror attack on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Armed police continue to patrol Marhaba beach in Sousse, where 38 people were killed in last Fridays terror attack on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area in one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on 7 July 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Flowers are placed on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: A woman looks at flowers placed on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Holidaymakers react as people lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Holidaymakers lay flowers on Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 30: Armed police continue to patrol Marhaba beach, where 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack last Friday, on June 30, 2015 in Sousse, Tunisia. British police have been deployed to the area as part of one of the biggest counter terror operations since the London bombings on July 7, 2005. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 27: A woman grieves as she lay flowers at the beach next to the Imperial Marhaba Hotel where 38 people were killed yesterday in a terrorist attack on June 27, 2015 in Souuse,Tunisia. Habib Essid Prime Minister of Tunisia announced a clampdown on security after the attack on a holiday resort.. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
A picture taken on June 27, 2015, shows the cordoned-off beach of the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel in Port el Kantaoui, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis, in the aftermath of a shooting attack on the beach resort claimed by the Islamic State group. The IS group on June 27 claimed responsibility for the massacre in the seaside resort that killed nearly 40 people, most of them British tourists, in the worst attack in the country's recent history. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
An English tourist survivor gets help at the Sahloul hospital after the mass shooting in the resort town of Sousse, a popular tourist destination 140 kilometers (90 miles) south of the Tunisian capital, on June 26, 2015. AFP PHOTO/FETHI BELAIDFETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 27: A woman grieves as she lay flowers at the beach next to the Imperial Marhaba Hotel where 38 people were killed yesterday in a terrorist attack on June 27, 2015 in Souuse,Tunisia. Habib Essid Prime Minister of Tunisia announced a clampdown on security after the attack on a holiday resort.. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Tourists comfort each other after the mass shooting in the resort town of Sousse, a popular tourist destination 140 kilometers (90 miles) south of the Tunisian capital, on June 26, 2015. At least 37 people, including foreigners, were killed at a Tunisian beach resort packed with holidaymakers, in the North African country's worst attack in recent history. AFP PHOTO/FETHI BELAIDFETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
Tunisian security forces man a checkpoint at the entrance of the resort area where is located the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel in Port el Kantaoui, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis, on June 27, 2015, in the aftermath of a shooting attack on the beach resort claimed by the Islamic State group. The IS group on June 27 claimed responsibility for the massacre in the seaside resort that killed nearly 40 people, most of them British tourists, in the worst attack in the country's recent history. AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAIDFETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
Blood stains are seen on a deckchair at the beach of the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel in Port el Kantaoui, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis, on June 27, 2015, in the aftermath of a shooting attack on the beach resort claimed by the Islamic State group. The IS group on June 27 claimed responsibility for the massacre in the seaside resort that killed nearly 40 people, most of them British tourists, in the worst attack in the country's recent history. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Tourists leave Tunisia at the Enfidha International airport after a shooting attack at the Imperial hotel in the resort town of Sousse, a popular tourist destination 140 kilometres (90 miles) south of the Tunisian capital, on June 27, 2015. At least 38 people, including foreigners, were killed in a mass shooting at a Tunisian beach resort packed with holidaymakers, in the North African country's worst attack in recent history. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 27: A man places flowers at the beach next to the Imperial Marhaba Hotel where 38 people were killed yesterday in a terrorist attack on June 27, 2015 in Souuse,Tunisia. Habib Essid Prime Minister of Tunisia announced a clampdown on security after the attack on a holiday resort.. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
SOUSSE, TUNISIA - JUNE 27: Flowers are placed at the beach next to the Imperial Marhaba Hotel where 38 people were killed yesterday in a terrorist attack on June 27, 2015 in Souuse,Tunisia. Habib Essid Prime Minister of Tunisia announced a clampdown on security after the attack on a holiday resort.. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Emergency vehicles at the scene after the massacre in Sousse (AP)
Lorna Carty
Tunisian security forces gather people in the hotel
Tunisian police officers at a hotel in Sousse where a terrorist attack took place (AP)

More of the 30 Britons who died were named today as tributes continued to be paid to those killed.

The family of John Welch, 74, from Corsham in Wiltshire, have had confirmation that he died in the terror attack, Wiltshire Police said.

Mr Welch was in Tunisia with his partner of eight years, Eileen Swannack, aged 73, and the couple were regular visitors to the beach resort of Sousse.

Composite of photograph of six of the British victims of the Tunisia beach massacre who are being returned to the UK. Top row from left, Adrian Evans, Patrick Evans and Joel Richards. Bottom row from left, Carly Lovett, Elaine and Denis Thwaites
Composite of photograph of six of the British victims of the Tunisia beach massacre who are being returned to the UK. Top row from left, Adrian Evans, Patrick Evans and Joel Richards. Bottom row from left, Carly Lovett, Elaine and Denis Thwaites
Undated handout photos issued by West Yorkshire Police of Christopher and Sharon Bell, who died in the Tunisia beach massacre
Joel Richards who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
David Thompson who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Undated handout photo issued by West Midlands Police of Patrick Evans who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Adrian Evans who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Joel Richards who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Patrick Evans who died in the terrorist attack on hotels in Sousse, Tunisia
Undated handout photo issued by Northumbria Police of Lisa Burbidge, a grandmother from Whickham, Gateshead, who was among the British and Irish citizens who died in the Tunisia beach massacre
BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated handout photo issued by Northumbria Police of Lisa Burbidge, a grandmother from Whickham, Gateshead, who was among the British and Irish citizens who died in the Tunisia beach massacre. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday July 1, 2015. See PA story POLICE Tunisia. Photo credit should read: Northumbria Police/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

Police have now confirmed that Eileen Swannack also died in the attack. Her family have been informed.

As the plane landed, a statement issued on behalf of Suzanne Richards for the Evans and Richards families said: "We are a very small and normal family, but nothing will ever be normal again.

"My son Joel, dad Pat and brother Adrian were our rocks and we are all heartbroken and devastated and will never get over losing them."

Joel's 16-year-old brother Owen survived the attack.

Ms Richards said the holiday was intended to be a celebration and had only just begun.

"The 'jolly boys outing' as they called it, was to celebrate Joel finishing his second year at university with high grades and Owen finishing his GCSEs," she said.

Ambulances carrying the victim's of last Friday's terrorist attack arrive at Tunis Airport
Ambulances carrying the victim's of last Friday's terrorist attack arrive at Tunis Airport

Charles Evans, known as Patrick, was believed to be 78.

Adrian worked as a manager in a gas services department, while Joel was believed to be a talented football referee.

Mr Stollery, 58, was a social worker from Nottinghamshire who was on holiday with his wife Cheryl.

Mr Thwaites, who had been on holiday with his wife Elaine when they were both killed, was a former Birmingham City football player.

Mr Mellor, an engineer from Bodmin in Cornwall, was killed as he shielded his wife on the beach.

Ms Lovett was a 24-year-old fashion blogger from Lincolnshire.

The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
The coffin of Denis Thwaites, one of the victims of last Friday's terrorist attack, is taken from the RAF C-17 aircraft at RAF Brize Norton (Photo by Joe Giddens-WPA Pool/Getty Images)

David Cameron told the Commons he is looking at creating a ministerial committee to co-ordinate work across Government "to provide all the support that the victims of this appalling attack deserve and also to make sure that, as a nation, we mark and commemorate this event appropriately".

Those wounded have already been brought back to the UK, with four severely injured holidaymakers flown home. They are being treated at hospitals in Birmingham, Oxford, Plymouth and London.

Among the four is Allison Heathcote, 48, from Felixstowe, Suffolk, who was celebrating her 30th wedding anniversary when she was gunned down.

She was shot repeatedly in her stomach and shoulder and was pictured shortly after the attack in her pink bikini lying immobile on a sun lounger as hotel staff tended to her wounds.

Her husband Philip, 52, was killed in the terror attack. She has undergone surgery at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, where she is in a critical condition.

Tunisian authorities are questioning several suspected associates of Rezgui, who had links to the terror group Islamic State (IS).

They have said he acted alone during the rampage but had accomplices who supported him beforehand, providing him with weapons and logistical support.

Tunisian president Beji Caid Essebsi said an investigation is under way into security failures and there would be armed tourist police on beaches.

A minute's silence will be held in memory of the victims at noon on Friday, a week after the outrage. Flags are expected to be flown at half-mast over Government departments and Buckingham Palace that day.

Tributes

Tributes have been paid to the UK and Irish citizens who were gunned down at the Sousse beach resort while on holiday in Tunisia.

Not all the British victims have been named, but here are those who are either confirmed to have died or are believed to have died in the massacre.

The British victims are:

  • John Welch and Eileen Swannack, from Wiltshire. Police have now received confirmation that Eileen Swannack, aged 73, from Biddeston, has been formally identified as a victim. Her family has been informed, Wiltshire Police said.

John Welch, aged 74 from Corsham. Mr Welch has formally identified as one of the victims, and police have informed his family, police said earlier.

Mr Welch was in Tunisia with Eileen, his partner of eight years. The couple were staying at the RIU Imperial Marhaba, one of the hotels targeted by the attacker and a place the couple "adored".

Mr Welch, a former plumber, loved Tunisia and he and the couple stayed at the same hotel twice a year for the past eight years.

  • Christopher and Sharon Bell, from Leeds.

In a statement issued through West Yorkshire Police, the couple's family said: "We are deeply saddened by the loss of both mum Sharon and dad Christopher who were taken from us during the terrorist attacks in Tunisia."

  • John Stollery, 58, a social worker from Nottinghamshire, was on holiday with his wife Cheryl and son when he was killed.

He had worked at Nottinghamshire County Council for 33 years, and spent the last 16 years working with children in care.

His wife said: "John was special, he made a difference and gave his best to others. We, his family, are proud of him and deeply saddened that he was taken from us in such a horrific and tragic way. We still had a long life to live with plans and dreams for our future together."

  • Retired scientist David Thompson, from Tadley, Hampshire, is also believed to have been killed.

The 80-year-old is understood to have worked for the Atomic Weapons Establishment, and has been described as a keen walker.

  • Chris Dyer was killed and his wife Gina Van Dort was seriously injured in the attack. She clung on to her dead husband's hand as paramedics tried to get her to safety, according to reports.

Mr Dyer, believed to be 32 and an engineer from Watford in north London, suffered from reactive arthritis.

He was a member of the Watford Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. The club said: "It is with great sorrow that we announce the tragic death of our teammate Chris Dyer as a result of the Tunisia shootings. Our hearts go out to his family. May he rest in peace."

  • Patrick Evans, believed to be 78, his son Adrian, and his 19-year-old grandson Joel Richards, died. Joel's brother Owen, 16, survived the attack.

Adrian Evans worked for Sandwell Council in the West Midlands as a manager in the gas services department. Council leader Darren Cooper said he was a "very popular and long-serving employee".

Joel, believed to be a student at the University of Worcester, was described as "a young, talented referee with the world at his feet" by the Birmingham County FA.

Birmingham-based Gaelic football club James Connolly's GFC also paid tribute to an ''exceptionally talented footballer''.

Walsall FC said they are "devastated" at the deaths and changed the main image on their social media accounts to a photograph showing the trio outside Wembley Stadium at the Saddlers' Johnstone's Paint Trophy final appearance three months ago.

  • Trudy Jones, of Blackwood in Gwent, south Wales, was described by her family as "our beautiful mother". Ms Jones was a 51-year-old divorced single mother-of-four and had been on holiday with her friends.

In a statement her family said: "Our mother of all people didn't deserve this, such a caring person who put everyone else before herself. Always willing to help others, she loved everyone around her including all of the people she cared for at work."

  • Bruce Wilkinson, 72, from Goole, East Yorkshire, was among the dead. His family paid tribute to the grandfather, reported to have been a retired power station worker.

They said: "Bruce was a loving family man, and in his working life worked to support the care of others. He was a kind and compassionate man, with a dry sense of humour. He was fun-loving, and will be deeply missed by friends and family alike."

  • Lisa Burbidge, a grandmother from Whickham, Gateshead.

Ms Burbidge's family paid tribute to the "most beautiful, amazing, caring and gentle person in our lives".

They said: "We have been left with a massive hole in our hearts. She leaves behind many family members including four fantastic grandchildren who were her world and will miss her tremendously.

  • Fashion blogger Carly Lovett, 24, from Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, reportedly survived the massacre on the beach only to die when a grenade was thrown into her hotel.

She had been on holiday with her fiance Liam, who she got engaged to at Christmas.

In a statement, the fiance and immediate family of Ms Lovett said they were praying that the "evil" seen in Tunisia would end to spare others the heartbreak they have experienced.

  • Former Birmingham City football player Denis Thwaites and his wife Elaine were both killed.

Their daughter, Lindsey, and son-in-law Daniel Clifford said: "We would also like to express our gratitude for the support and messages received from everyone. Words can't express what all the family are feeling at this difficult time."

Birmingham City FC said: "We are deeply shocked and saddened by the death of former player Denis Thwaites and his wife Elaine in the Tunisian terrorist attack. Our thoughts are with Denis' family. The club also offers its condolences to all who are mourning loved ones due to this atrocity."

  • Philip Heathcote, 52, was killed and his wife Allison seriously injured in the attack.

The couple, who lived in Felixstowe, Suffolk, were celebrating their 30th wedding anniversary in Tunisia.

Mrs Heathcote, 48, was shot repeatedly. She was pictured shortly after the attack lying still on a sun lounger as a group tended to her wounds. Doctors put her into a medically-induced coma and she has been flown by RAF jet back to Britain for treatment.

  • Engineer Stephen Mellor, from Bodmin in Cornwall, was killed as he shielded his wife Cheryl on the beach. The nurse told the Mirror: "I was screaming at people to check him and someone looked and they said he had no pulse. They said he was gone."

A neighbour close to their home in Cornwall, who asked not to be named, said: "I only found out about what happened to them when a reporter knocked at my door and told me. I can't believe it has happened, and happened to them. It brings it all back home."

  • Couple Sue Davey and Scott Chalkley were on holiday together in Sousse. Ms Davey's son Conor Fulford, from Tamworth, Staffordshire, said she had died.

Mr Chalkley's son Ross Naylor had described his father as a "loving, typical bloke".

Mr Naylor, from Derby, said: "Me and Brad lost our Dad, unfortunately he was caught up in the sickening attacks in Tunisia and is no longer with us."

The couple worked for Severn Trent Water, who said: "Sue and Scott had a passion to help others however they could, they cared enormously for all those they worked with and were totally committed to our customers and our company."

  • Claire Windass from Hull was killed while her husband Jim is understood to have survived the attack.

Karl Turner, MP for East Hull tweeted: "So sorry Claire Windass from Hull was killed in Tunisia terrorist attack. My thoughts with family & friends. RIP."

  • Jim and Ann McQuire, from Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire, were both killed.

The couple's minister from Cumbernauld Abronhill Church of Scotland paid tribute to them, saying they had a close family and would be sorely missed.

Mr McQuire was a captain in the Boys' Brigade, a Christian youth organisation, which said on its website that it is "shocked and deeply saddened" by the news.

They added: "They had given a life of service to young people and to the church and community and the prayers and thoughts of The Boys' Brigade go out to their family and friends and to the 5th Cumbernauld Company at this most difficult time."

  • Stuart Cullen, 52, from the Lowestoft area of Suffolk, is believed to have died instantly. His wife was injured but survived and has returned to the UK.
  • Billy and Lisa Graham, from Perthshire in Scotland, are also reported to have died.

Billy's brother Lindsay Graham told the Daily Record: "Just to tell you my brother Billy and his wife Lisa are dead."

Mr Graham reportedly booked the holiday as a present for his wife, who turned 50 earlier this year.

  • Janet and John Stocker were confirmed dead by their family.

Mr Stocker, 74, was a retired printer, born and bred in Peckham, south-east London, and was a father of five children and 10 grandchildren, while Mrs Stocker, 63, was born and raised with her two brothers in Fulham, south-west London.

In a statement the family said the pair "were the happiest, most loving couple" who "died together doing what they enjoyed most; sunbathing side by side".

The Irish victims are:

  • Lorna Carty, an Irish mother of two from Robinstown, Co Meath. Bishop of Meath Michael Smith said Mrs Carty was the victim of a "senseless killing".

He said: "Lorna worked here in Navan in one of the medical centres and is known to, and loved by, very many people.

"The brutal circumstances of Lorna's death are sadly becoming more frequent."

He added: "We extend our sympathy and our prayers to Lorna's husband Declan, to her children Simon and Hazel and extended family and friends."

  • Husband and wife Laurence and Martina Hayes, both in their 50s, from the town of Athlone in Co Westmeath.

Mr Hayes was a schools transport inspector who worked for transport company Bus Eireann for the last 20 years. A company spokeswoman said Mr Hayes was "highly regarded on both a personal and professional level, by all his colleagues at Bus Eireann".

Co Westmeath GAA tweeted a message of condolence to the family: "Sincere sympathy to the Hayes family (from) Athlone who suffered their tragic losses in the terror shooting in Tunisia."

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From Belfast Telegraph