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17 killed as police clash with gunmen in Tajikistan

Published 04/09/2015

The government says the gunmen were involved in armed opposition forces during the civil war of the 1990s
The government says the gunmen were involved in armed opposition forces during the civil war of the 1990s

Armed groups led by a disaffected deputy defence minister have mounted attacks in and around the capital of Tajikistan, leaving at least eight police and nine militants dead, authorities said.

It is not yet clear what lay behind the attacks in Dushanbe, but government statements indicated the gunmen were involved in armed opposition forces during the civil war of the 1990s.

The US Embassy said the significance of the clashes was unclear, but "they may be precursors to other acts of violence". The embassy closed down and advised embassy staff not to go out or send their children to school.

General Abduhalim Nazarzoda, the minister accused of plotting the unrest, earned his position in government as a result of the peace deal that brought an end to the civil war.

Efforts to squeeze out the opposition have intensified in recent years, and Gen Nazarzoda and other alleged accomplices are being linked with the Islamic Revival Party, which was banned by a Justice Ministry decree late last month. The party denied any link to the suspects.

The crackdown against the party, the only legal Islamic political entity across former Soviet Central Asia, is likely to intensify following the unrest. The party lost its only two seats in parliament in an election this year that international observers said fell short of democratic standards.

Tensions provoked by attempts to stamp out devout Islam have bubbled under the surface. Young men are said to be pressured not have beards and official state media have mounted campaigns against women wearing veils.

The main clash took place before dawn in the town of Vakhdat, east of the capital. The trouble was linked by local media to the fatal beating of a young man, whose relatives accused police of being responsible and said he was targeted for detention because he had a beard.

In contrast with neighbouring Afghanistan, the former Soviet Central Asian nation of Tajikistan rarely sees such bloodshed and the unrest is likely to unnerve the government.

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