Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

Home News World

Bernie Sanders campaign surges after Wisconsin win but still has much to do

Published 06/04/2016

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves to the crowd with his wife, Jane Sanders, by his side during a campaign rally Tuesday evening in the Arts and Sciences Auditorium at the University of Wyoming campus on April 5, 2016, in Laramie, Wyo. Sanders won the Democratic presidential primary in Wisconsin Tuesday. (Blaine McCartney/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle via AP)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves to the crowd with his wife, Jane Sanders, by his side during a campaign rally Tuesday evening in the Arts and Sciences Auditorium at the University of Wyoming campus on April 5, 2016, in Laramie, Wyo. Sanders won the Democratic presidential primary in Wisconsin Tuesday. (Blaine McCartney/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle via AP)
Marlow Mittelstaedt holds a sign and cheers while waiting for the arrival of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., before a campaign rally in Laramie, Wyo., Tuesday, April 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pumps his fist during a campaign event, Monday, April 4, 2016, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during an event named as a "victory rally for $15 minimum wage and paid family leave" at the Javitz Center in New York on April 4,2016. Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders both support an increase, differing only on the scale and timing of such a move. / AFP PHOTO / KENA BETANCURKENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a campaign event, Monday, April 4, 2016, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
A woman holds a banner before Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a event named as 'victory rally for $15 minimum wage and paid family leave' at the Javitz Center in New York on April 4,2016. Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders both support an increase, differing only on the scale and timing of such a move. / AFP PHOTO / KENA BETANCURKENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images
A woman holds banners before Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a event named as a "victory rally for $15 minimum wage and paid family leave" at the Javitz Center in New York on April 4,2016. Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders both support an increase, differing only on the scale and timing of such a move. / AFP PHOTO / KENA BETANCURKENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN - APRIL 04: Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) arrives at a campaign rally at the Wisconsin Convention Center on April 4, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Voters in Wisconsin go to the polls tomorrow for the state's primary. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN - APRIL 04: Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) arrives at a campaign rally at the Wisconsin Convention Center on April 4, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Voters in Wisconsin go to the polls tomorrow for the state's primary. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Democratic Presidential Candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks at an overflow of a rally at St. Mary's Park in the Bronx borough of New York City on March 3, 2016. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
Supporters of US democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders arrive to attend a campaign rally at the Saint Mary's Park in the Bronx, New York,on March 31, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Jewel SAMADJEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
A supporter of US democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders arrives to attend a rally at the Saint Mary's Park in Bronx, New York,on March 31, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Jewel SAMADJEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 31: Democratic Presidential Candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks at a rally at St. Mary's Park in the Bronx borough March 31, 2016 in New York City. Sanders and opponent Hillary Clinton are campaigning ahead of the April 5 primary in New York. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
A supporter of US democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders displays a placard during a rally at the Saint Mary's Park in Bronx, New York,on March 31, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Jewel SAMADJEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Attendees wait in line prior to a rally for Democratic Presidential Candidate Senator Bernie Sanders at St. Mary's Park on March 31, 2016 in the Bronx borough of New York City. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
US actress Rosario Dawson greets Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders's supporters during a campaign rally at the Saint Mary's Park in Bronx, New York, on March 31, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Jewel SAMADJEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders continued his presidential primary hot streak and won the Democratic contest in Wisconsin, the sixth race the Vermont senator has won in the last seven.

While all the votes are still being counted, multiple sources projected Mr Sanders as the winner in Wisconsin. Polls ahead of the primary had shown him to be slightly ahead of Hillary Clinton.

"Momentum is starting this campaign 60 to 70 points behind Secretary Clinton," Mr Sanders said in his victory speech on Tuesday from Wyoming. "Momentum is in the last two or three weeks that national polls have us either one point up or one point down."

Mr Sanders continues to win primaries, but he also has been beating Ms Clinton in fundraising, gaining momentum that has some pundits asking if he will be able to catch his opponent in the coming months.

The Sanders campaign raised $44 million in March, compared to $29.5 million raised by Ms Clinton, the Washington Post reported. That was a new record for Mr Sanders, topping the $43.3 million raised in February.

“What this campaign is doing is bringing together millions of people contributing an average of just $27 each to take on a billionaire class which is so used to buying elections,” Mr Sanders said in a statement last week. “Working people standing together are going to propel this campaign to the Democratic nomination and then the White House.”

Read more

Panama Papers: Leak could hand Bernie Sanders the keys to the White House

Cruz win in Wisconsin leaves Trump a damaged front-runner  

But as the momentum builds for Mr Sanders and the pressure mounts for Ms Clinton, the Sanders campaign must start winning big if the Vermont senator is to catch up to the former secretary of state. CNN reported that if Mr Sanders were to win the 21 remaining presidential primaries on the calendar with 55 percent of the vote, he still wouldn't be able to match Ms Clinton for delegates.

"What momentum is about is my belief is that if we wake up the American people...there is nothing that we cannot accomplish," Mr Sanders said Tuesday night.

Ms Clinton has 1,271 delegates to 1,024 for Mr Sanders. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic presidential nomination and all Democratic contests award delegates proportionally, based on number of votes.

Still, with Wisconsin in the books, 50 per cent of Democratic delegates remain. If Mr Sanders can continue to win and start winning bigger, his campaign will increasingly consider the possibility that their candidate could go to the Democratic National Convention in July with a chance to grab the nomination.

Read more

Bernie Sanders holds first New York rally: Rosario Dawson and Spike Lee lend support  

“We’ve mapped out a path to victory in our campaign in terms of delegates — pledged delegates — and we don’t have to win everywhere, but we do have to win most of the states coming up,” the Sanders campaign manager Jeff Weaver told MSNBC on Tuesday. “So there’s no one state that’s a must-win, and as we look forward we’re going to be able to accumulate the delegates we need to get the pledged delegate lead by the end of this primary and caucus process.”

Independent

Independent News Service

Read More

From Belfast Telegraph