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Germanwings plane crash: Co-pilot may have spiked captain's drink

By Kashmira Gander

Published 10/04/2015

Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz
Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz

Investigators probing last month’s Germanwings crash are trying to determine whether the Andreas Lubitz placed a chemical in the captain’s drink to force him to go to the toilet.

The 27-year-old co-pilot crashed the Airbus 320 into an Alpine ravine in France, killing himself and the other 149 passengers and crew on board.

A black box recorder found in the flight revealed that Lubitz locked the cockpit door when the captain left for a toilet break. He then used controls to override the entry code, and took the chance to crash the plane as the captain desperately tried to break back in.

German prosecutors investigating Lubitz's computer are now attempting to confirm whether Lubtiz secretly added a diuretic – which gives a person the urge to urinate - to Captain Patrick Sodenheimer's coffee to make him leave the flight deck, according to reports in Germany seen by Mail Online.

Investigators have already uncovered how Lubitz searched for suicide methods and information on cockpit doors before the crash.

In the days running up to the tragedy, Lubitz, who was known to have suffered with depression, logged on to his computer under the name “Skydevil” and searched for information on cockpit security.

Between 16 to 23 March – the day before the disaster – Lubtiz repeatedly searched terms including “bipolarity”, “manic depression”, “migraines”, “impaired vision” and “acoustic trauma”, investigators with access to a tablet computer found in his apartment told Bild am Sonntag newspaper.

Source: Independent

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Forensic experts of the French gendarmerie looking for the black box or clues on the site of the March 24 crash of a Germanwings Airbus A320 in which all 150 people on board were killed.
Forensic experts of the French gendarmerie looking for the black box or clues on the site of the March 24 crash of a Germanwings Airbus A320 in which all 150 people on board were killed.
Forensic experts of the French gendarmerie disaster victim identification unit (UGIVC) working under a tent near the site of the March 24 crash of a Germanwings Airbus A320 in which all 150 people on board were killed.
LA VERNET, FRANCE - MARCH 28: Relatives stand at a monument to honour the victims of Germanwings flight 4U9525 in front of the mountains near the crash site on March 26, 2015 in Le Vernet, France. France.
LE VERNET, FRANCE - MARCH 28: Policemen stand in front of a memorial stone for the victims of the Germanwings Airbus flight near to the crash site on March 28, 2015 in Le Vernet, France.
Officials from the Japanese Consulate in Marseille reflect on March 29 2015 in front of headstone in Seyne-les-Alpes, the closest accessible site to where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed on March 24 in the French Alps, killing all 150 people on board.
SEYNE, FRANCE - MARCH 29: Rescue workers and gendarmerie continue their search operation near the site of the Germanwings plane crash on March 29, 2015 in Seyne les Alpes, France.
A helicopter of the French gendarmerie flies over Seyne-les-Alpes on March 28, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings flight crashed in the French Alps, killing all 150 aboard.
Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz
Search and rescue teams attend to the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus in the French Alps on March 25, 2015 near Seyne, France.
The home of Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz
March 26, 2015 -- The cockpit voice recorder recovered from the Germanwings flight that crashed in the French Alps indicates that the co-pilot intentionally started a descent while the pilot was locked out of the cockpit. Graphic shows layout of the A320 cockpit and entrance door.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, left, French President Francois Hollande, right, and Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy pay respect to victims in front of the mountain where a Germanwings jetliner crashed Tuesday, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, March 25, 2015.
The voice data recorder of the Germanwings jetliner that crashed Tuesday in the French Alps. (AP Photo/Bureau d'Enquetes et d'Analyses)
Journalists wait on March 25, 2015 on a air base in Seyne, French Alps a day after a Germanwings Airbus A320 smashed into the French Alps, killing all 150 people on board.
French emergency services workers (back) and members of the French gendarmerie gather in Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps.
BARCELONA, SPAIN- MARCH 24: Relatives of passangers of the Germanwings plane crashed in French Alps arrive at the Terminal 2 of the Barcelona El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 148 people on board has crashed in French Alps. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
A poster reading "Yesterday we were many, today we are alone" can be seen in front of a memorial of flowers and candles near the Joseph-Koenig-Gymnasium secondary school in Haltern am See, western Germany on March 25, 2015, from where some of the Germanwings plane crash victims came. AFP PHOTO / SASCHA SCHUERMANNSASCHA SCHUERMANN/AFP/Getty Images
A helicopter of civil security services is seen in Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps.
The March 7, 2014 photo shows an Airbus A320 of German airline Germanwings as it lands at the airport in Hamburg, northern Germany. A Germanwings passenger jet carrying 148 people crashed in the French Alps region as it traveled from Barcelona to Duesseldorf Tuesday, March 24, 2015. (AP Photo/dpa, Jan-Arwed Richter)
Members of the French gendarmerie gather in Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps.
The arrivals board shows flight 4U 9525 without a status at the airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, Tuesday, March 24, 2015, after a Germanwings passenger jet carrying 148 people crashed in the French Alps region as it traveled from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
A man who appears to have waited for the missing flight 4U 9525 reacts at the airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, Tuesday, March 24, 2015, after a Germanwings passenger jet carrying 148 people crashed in the French Alps region as it traveled from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
French president Francois Hollande addresses medias at the Elysee presidential palace after a meeting with Spanish royal couple, on March 24, 2015 at in Paris. Spanish King Felipe VI cut short his first state visit to France after 150 people died in a Germanwings airliner crash in the French Alps after earlier taking off from Barcelona. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAUsMARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images
The logo of German airline Lufthansa (top) and its Germanwings subsidiary can be seen near a counter on March 24, 2015 at the airport in Duesseldorf, western Germany, where the crashed Germanwings airplane was due to land.
A man who appears to have waited for the missing flight 4U 9525 covers his face at the airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, Tuesday, March 24, 2015, after a Germanwings passenger jet carrying 148 people crashed in the French Alps region as it traveled from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives for a press conference follwing a Germanwings plane crash on March 24, 2015 in Berlin. An Airbus A320 belonging to Germanwings, low-cost airline owned by German flag carrier Lufthansa, en route from Barcelona to Duesseldorf disappeared from the radar screens. AFP PHOTO / TOBIAS SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
Carsten Spohr, CEO of German airline Lufthansa
An Airbus 320 aircraft of Lufthansa's low-cost subsidiary Germanwings
An Airbus 320 aircraft of Lufthansa's low-cost subsidiary Germanwings
Spanish King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia listen to French president as he addresses medias at the Elysee presidential palace after a meeting, on March 24, 2015 at in Paris.
Helicopters of the French Air Force (back) and civil security services are seen in Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps.

Independent News Service

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