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Isis fighters 'shoot down US-led coalition war plane and capture pilot'

The aircraft was reportedly shot down near the Syrian city of Raqqa

By Heather Saul

Isis fighters shot down a Jordanian warplane over Syria believed to be from the US-led coalition and captured one if its pilots, the Jordanian army has confirmed.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the aircraft was shot down yesterday near the northern city of Raqqa, Isis's biggest stronghold in Syria.

The Observatory said the warplane was part of the US-led coalition, adding that the captured pilot is an Arab.

The Jordanian army said on Wednesday one of its pilots was captured by Isis militants after his plane was downed during coalition air raids.

"Jordan holds the group and its supporters responsible for the safety of the pilot and his life," an army statement read on state television said.

The pro-Isis Raqqa Media Centre (RMC) posted pictures of the pilot shortly after he was captured by militants.

Relatives of the pilot say he was captured by fighters after his plane was downed.

Two relatives told Reuters they were notified by the head of the Jordanian air force of his capture and verified the images of him.

Another photograph published by the RMC showed the man — wearing only a white shirt and soaking wet — being captured by three gunmen as he was taken out of what appeared to be a lake.

AL RAI Chief International Correspondent shared a picture of what he said was the captured pilot meeting the King of Jordan.

RMC later posted a photograph of the Jordanian military identity card of the pilot identifying him as Mu'ath Safi Yousef al-Kaseasbeh who was born on May 29, 1988.

The US-led coalition has carried out hundreds of air strikes against Isis positions in Syria since September 23.

Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates have joined in air strikes against the extremist group, while Qatar is providing logistical support.

Source: Independent

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