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Isis seize Palmyra: World mourns fall of Syria's 'Bride of the Desert' by sharing photos and memories

Published 21/05/2015

A file picture taken on March 14, 2014 shows a partial view of the ancient oasis city of Palmyra AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EIDJOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images
A file picture taken on March 14, 2014 shows a partial view of the ancient oasis city of Palmyra AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EIDJOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images
This picture released on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 by the website of Islamic State militants, shows a tank with Islamic State group fighters clashing with Syrian government forces on a road between Homs and Palmyra, Syria. Islamic State militants overran the famed archaeological site at Palmyra early on Thursday, just hours after seizing the central Syrian town, activists and officials said, raising concerns the extremists might destroy some of the priceless ruins as they have done in neighboring Iraq. (The website of Islamic State militants via AP)
In this picture released on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 by the website of Islamic State militants, Islamic State fighters take cover during a battle against Syrian government forces on a road between Homs and Palmyra, Syria. Islamic State militants overran the famed archaeological site at Palmyra early on Thursday, just hours after seizing the central Syrian town, activists and officials said, raising concerns the extremists might destroy some of the priceless ruins as they have done in neighboring Iraq. (The website of Islamic State militants via AP)
This picture released on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 on the website of Islamic State militants, shows black columns of smoke rising through the air during a battle between Islamic State militants and the Syrian government forces on a road between Homs and Palmyra, Syria. Islamic State militants overran the famed archaeological site at Palmyra early on Thursday, just hours after seizing the central Syrian town, activists and officials said, raising concerns the extremists might destroy some of the priceless ruins as they have done in neighboring Iraq. (The website of Islamic State militants via AP)
(FILES) - A file picture taken on March 14, 2014 shows a sculpture depicting a rich family from the ancient Syrian oasis city of Palmyra, 215 kilometres northeast of Damascus, displayed at the city's museum. Hundreds of statues and ancient artifacts from Palmyra's museum have been transferred out of the city as Islamic State (IS) group jihadists threaten the historic treasures after they took full control of Palmyra on May 21, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EIDJOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) - A file picture taken on March 14, 2014 shows a sculpture found in the ancient Syrian oasis city of Palmyra, 215 kilometres northeast of Damascus, displayed at the city's museum. Hundreds of statues and ancient artifacts from Palmyra's museum have been transferred out of the city as Islamic State (IS) group jihadists threaten the historic treasures after they took full control of Palmyra on May 21, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EID JOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) - A file picture taken on March 14, 2014 shows the citadel (background) of the ancient oasis city of Palmyra, 215 kilometres northeast of Damascus, over looking the city. Jihadists from the Islamic State group seized full control of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra on May 21, 2015, a monitor said, putting the world heritage site at risk of destruction. AFP PHOTO/JOSEPH EIDJOSEPH EID/AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) - A file picture taken on May 18, 2015 shows the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra, a day after Islamic State (IS) group jihadists fired rockets into the city, killing several people. Jihadists from the Islamic State group seized full control of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra on May 21, 2015, a monitor said, putting the world heritage site at risk of destruction. AFP PHOTO /STRSTR/AFP/Getty Images
A general view taken on May 18, 2015 shows the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra, a day after Islamic State (IS) group jihadists fired rockets into the city, killing several people. Fierce clashes have rocked Palmyra's outskirts since IS launched an offensive on May 13 to capture the 2,000-year-old world heritage site nicknamed "the pearl of the desert". AFP PHOTO /STRSTR/AFP/Getty Images
A general view taken on May 18, 2015 shows the castle of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra, a day after Islamic State (IS) group jihadists fired rockets into the city and killing five people. Fierce clashes have rocked Palmyra's outskirts since IS launched an offensive on May 13 to capture the 2,000-year-old world heritage site nicknamed "the pearl of the desert". AFP PHOTO /STRSTR/AFP/Getty Images

People are mourning the fall of Palmyra by sharing their memories and photos of time spent wandering through the ancient city before it was invaded by Isis.

The 2,000-year-old city often described by Syrians as the "Bride of the Desert” was once a tourist attraction that saw thousands explore its ruins. Overnight, the city fell to militants who have been battling soldiers at the gates of Palmyra for over a week.

The Unesco World Heritage Site is famous for its grand colonnades, temple, theatre, tombs and stone ruins. But news that it was overtaken by the same group that took great pleasure in demolishing ancient Assyrian and Roman-era sites in Iraq has left many wondering if future generations will ever get the opportunity to build their own memories there.

Independent News Service

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