Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 21 December 2014

Kashmiri separatists prime suspects for Mumbai attacks

Four Mumbai terrorists 'had links with UK'

Indian army soldiers take positions near the Oberoi hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandoes raided two luxury hotels to try to free hostages Thursday, and explosions and gunshots shook India's financial capital a day after suspected Muslim militants killed people. Backdrop is of the Air India building. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
A still taken from Indian TV of an armed man at the Chhatrapati Sivaji railway station in Mumbai
A gunman walks at the Chatrapathi Sivaji Terminal railway station in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008.
Flames come from a room of the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandoes raided two luxury hotels to try to free hostages Thursday, and explosions and gunshots shook India's financial capital a day after suspected Muslim militants killed people. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Guests and hotel staff are being rescued by a firefighter at the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
People take cover at the sound of gunfire outside The Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandoes raided two luxury hotels to try to free hostages Thursday, and explosions and gunshots shook India's financial capital a day after suspected Muslim militants killed people. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
Armed personnel keep watch outside the Taj Mahal Palace hotel in Mumbai, India, late Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandoes raided two luxury hotels to try to free hostages Thursday, and explosions and gunshots shook India's financial capital a day after suspected Muslim militants killed 104 people. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
An armed personnel looks on as he keeps watch outside the Taj Palace hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandos raided two luxury hotels to try to free hostages Thursday, held by well-trained heavily armed gunmen, in a coordinated series of attacks.(AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Smoke and flames rising from one of the wings of the Taj Palace Hotel, are also reflected in car window, in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Indian commandoes killed the last three gunman at a landmark hotel late Thursday and were sweeping another luxury hotel in search of hostages and trapped people after suspected Muslim militants stormed targets across Mumbai, leaving at least 119 people dead. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Armed security personnel wait outside the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandoes raided two luxury hotels to try to free hostages Thursday, and explosions and gunshots shook India's financial capital a day after suspected Muslim militants killed people. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Indian army soldiers take up positions near the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Black-clad Indian commandos raided two luxury hotels in the city, to try to free hostages Thursday, and explosions and gunshots shook India's financial capital a day after suspected Muslim militants killed people. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Armed gunmen are seen moving at the Chatrapathi Sivaji Terminal railway station in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Mumbai Mirror, Sebastian D'souza) ** INDIA OUT CREDIT MANDATORY **
National Security Guard commandoes take position near an apartment where suspected gunmen have held a family hostage in Colaba, Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
National Security Guard commandoes secure an area near an apartment where suspected gunmen have held a family hostage in Colaba, Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
Local people gather to watch action as policemen and commandoes surround an apartment where suspected gunmen have held a family hostage in Colaba, Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
Indian Army personnel take positions outside the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
Indian Army personnel move in to take positions outside the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
A terrorist attack victim's body is shifted to an ambulance to be taken for postmortem outside the St. Georges Hospital in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Rescue and security personnel carry a body from the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
A local man ducks for cover as he crosses an alleyway exposed to fire from alleged gunmen holding a family hostage in Colaba, Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)
A grieving relative of a terrorist attack victim, facing camera, is consoled by other outside the St. Georges Hospital in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 101 people, taking Westerners hostage and leaving parts of the city under siege Thursday, police said. A group of suspected Muslim militants claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Sharda Janardhan Chitikar, left, is consoled by a relative as she grieves the death of her two children in a terrorist attack as she waits for their bodies outside St. Georges Hospital in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, a crowded train station and a Jewish group's headquarters, killing people, and holding Westerners hostage in coordinated attacks on the nation's commercial center that were blamed on Muslim militants. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Sharda Janardhan Chitikar, center, is consoled by relatives as she grieves the death of her two children in a terrorist attack as she waits for their bodies outside St. Georges Hospital in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, a crowded train station and a Jewish group's headquarters, killing people, and holding Westerners hostage in coordinated attacks on the nation's commercial center that were blamed on Muslim militants. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Supporters of Socialist Party burn an effigy of a terrorist involved in Mumbai shooting, in Allahabad, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, a crowded train station and a Jewish group's headquarters, killing people, and holding Westerners hostage in coordinated attacks on the nation's commercial center that were blamed on Muslim militants. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
An Indian security person stands outside a hotel where the cricket teams of England and India are staying in Bhubaneswar, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. The remainder of England's limited-overs cricket tour of India has been scrapped and a Champions League Twenty20 tournament scheduled for next week is in doubt following terror attacks in Mumbai.(AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout)
** EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT ** Luggage of passengers lie scattered on a blood splattered platform at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus railway station in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Police say several people have been wounded in a series of attacks by terrorist gunmen at seven sites in Mumbai, including two luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo)
Army soldiers take position outside the Taj Hotel, Mumbai's landmark hotel, after an terror attack in Mumbai on Wednesday night November 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
Police examine a damaged vehicle at the site of an explosion in Mumbai, India's financial capital, on Wednesday evening. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
Unidentified guests of The Taj Hotel comfort each other in an ambulance after they were rescued from the hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
A foreign tourist breaks down after being rescued safely from a hotel following an attack in Mumbai in Mumbai, India, Wednesday night, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
Fire engulfs a part of the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Employees of the Taj Hotel comfort each other after they were rescued from the hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen have stormed luxury hotels and other sites in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 82 people and taking Westerners hostage. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Fire fighter rescues a guest of the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen have stormed luxury hotels and other sites in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 82 people and taking Westerners hostage. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
** ALTERNATE CROP ** Employees of The Taj Hotel comfort each other after they were rescued from the hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Scene at the site of a blast in Coilaba, a market in downtown Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
An unidentified guest of the Taj Hotel watches other guests being rescued from a window of the hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen have stormed luxury hotels and other sites in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 82 people and taking Westerners hostage. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
** ALTERNATE CROP ** Unidentified guests of the Taj Hotel comfort each other in an ambulance after they were rescued from the hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen have stormed luxury hotels and other sites in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital, killing at least 82 people and taking Westerners hostage. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
** ALTERNATE CROP ** A firefighter rescues guests of The Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Police officers inspect a car after they shot dead two suspects in Mumbai, India, on late Wednesday night November 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
** EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT ** A victim of a gun attack lies on a hospital bed at the St. George's hospital in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Indian police say several people have been wounded when gunmen opened fire on at least seven places in Mumbai, including luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
The Taj Hotel, Mumbai's landmark hotel, is caught fire after an attack in Mumbai, India's financial capital, on early Thursday morning November 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
A man carries a victim of a gun attack at the Chatrapati Shivaji Terminus in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. A top state officials says at least 40 people have been killed and 100 have been injured when gunmen opened fire on a crowded Mumbai train station, luxury hotels and a restaurant popular with tourists. Johnny Joseph, chief secretary for Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, says the death toll could rise further. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
A police officer watches the Taj Hotel, Mumbai's landmark hotel, after an attack in Mumbai, India's financial capital, on Wednesday night November 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
Smoke emerges from behind a dome on the Taj Hotel in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital, killing at least 78 people and wounding at least 200, officials said. The gunmen were specifically targeting Britons and Americans, media reports said, and may be holding hostages. The gunmen also attacked police headquarters in south Mumbai, the area where most of the attacks, which began late Wednesday and continued into Thursday morning, took place. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
A man injured in firing leans on a railing in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Police say several people have been wounded in a series of attacks by terrorist gunmen at seven sites in Mumbai, including two luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo)
Fire engulfs a part of the Taj Mahal Hotel as firemen try to douse it in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. A previously unknown group, apparently Muslim militants, took responsibility for the attacks. (AP Photo/Gautam Singh)
Policemen stand guard on a street at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Indian police say several people have been wounded when gunmen opened fire on at least seven places in Mumbai, including luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo)
Flames and smoke erupt from the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai, India in this image made from television, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. A previously unknown group, apparently Muslim militants, took responsibility for the attacks. A raging fire and explosions struck one of the hotels, the landmark Taj Mahal, early Thursday. (AP Photo/STAR NEWS) ** INDIA OUT TV OUT **
Flames erupt from the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai, India in this image made from television, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. A previously unknown group, apparently Muslim militants, took responsibility for the attacks. A raging fire and explosions struck one of the hotels, the landmark Taj Mahal, early Thursday. (AP Photo/STAR NEWS) ** INDIA OUT TV OUT **
The Taj Hotel, Mumbai's landmark hotel, is caught fire after an attack in Mumbai, India's financial capital, on early Thursday morning November 27, 2008. Teams of heavily armed gunmen stormed luxury hotels, a popular restaurant, hospitals and a crowded train station in coordinated attacks across India's financial capital Wednesday night, killing at least 78 people and taking Westerners hostage, police said. (AP Photo)
** EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT ** A victim of a gun attack lies on a hospital bed at the St. George's hospital in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Indian police say several people have been wounded when gunmen opened fire on at least seven places in Mumbai, including luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
People stand around a damaged vehicle at the site of an explosion in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Wednesday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. "The terrorists have used automatic weapons and in some places grenades have been lobbed," said Roy. Gunmen opened fire on two of the city's best known Luxury hotels, the Taj Mahal and the Oberoi. They also attacked the crowded Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus station in southern Mumbai and Leopold's restaurant, a Mumbai landmark. It was not immediately clear what the motive was for the attacks. (AP Photo)
A cart stands amidst shattered glass on an empty platform at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus railway station in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Police say several people have been wounded in a series of attacks by terrorist gunmen at seven sites in Mumbai, including two luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo)
A man shows the wounds of another man who was injured in a gunbattle at the Chatrapati Shivaji Terminus in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Indian police say several people have been wounded when gunmen opened fire on at least seven places in Mumbai, including luxury hotels. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, says police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo)
A man injured in a gunbattle is carried to a hospital, at the Chatrapati Shivaji Terminus, in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Thursday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. (AP Photo)
Policemen inspect the site of a gun attack at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital, killing 16 people and wounding 90, officials and media reports said. A.N. Roy, a senior police officer, said police continued to battle the gunmen. (AP Photo)
An injured man lies on a hotel's baggage trolley in Mumbai, India in this image made from television, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Wednesday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. "The terrorists have used automatic weapons and in some places grenades have been lobbed," said Roy. Gunmen opened fire on two of the city's best known Luxury hotels, the Taj Mahal and the Oberoi. They also attacked the crowded Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus station in southern Mumbai and Leopold's restaurant, a Mumbai landmark. It was not immediately clear what the motive was for the attacks. (AP Photo/STAR NEWS) ** INDIA OUT TV OUT **
Firefighters inspect the site of an explosion in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Wednesday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. "The terrorists have used automatic weapons and in some places grenades have been lobbed," said Roy. Gunmen opened fire on two of the city's best known Luxury hotels, the Taj Mahal and the Oberoi. They also attacked the crowded Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus station in southern Mumbai and Leopold's restaurant, a Mumbai landmark. It was not immediately clear what the motive was for the attacks. (AP Photo)
A fire burns at the Oberoi hotel in Mumbai, India in this image made from television, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008
People stand around a damaged vehicle at the site of an explosion in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Wednesday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. "The terrorists have used automatic weapons and in some places grenades have been lobbed," said Roy. Gunmen opened fire on two of the city's best known Luxury hotels, the Taj Mahal and the Oberoi. They also attacked the crowded Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus station in southern Mumbai and Leopold's restaurant, a Mumbai landmark. It was not immediately clear what the motive was for the attacks. (AP Photo)
Police officers at the scene of a restaurant attack in Mumbai, India in this image made from television, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Wednesday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. "The terrorists have used automatic weapons and in some places grenades have been lobbed," said Roy. Gunmen opened fire on two of the city's best known Luxury hotels, the Taj Mahal and the Oberoi. They also attacked the crowded Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus station in southern Mumbai and Leopold's restaurant, a Mumbai landmark. It was not immediately clear what the motive was for the attacks. (AP Photo/NDTV) ** INDIA OUT TV OUT **
People seek cover at the front of a hotel in Mumbai, India in this image made from television, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008. Gunmen targeted luxury hotels, a popular tourist attraction and a crowded train station in at least seven attacks in India's financial capital Wednesday, wounding 25 people, police and witnesses said. A.N Roy police commissioner of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, said several people had been wounded in the attacks and police were battling the gunmen. "The terrorists have used automatic weapons and in some places grenades have been lobbed," said Roy. Gunmen opened fire on two of the city's best known Luxury hotels, the Taj Mahal and the Oberoi. They also attacked the crowded Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus station in southern Mumbai and Leopold's restaurant, a Mumbai landmark. It was not immediately clear what the motive was for the attacks. (AP Photo/STAR NEWS) ** INDIA OUT TV OUT **

UK security agencies are sifting through information sent by Indian authorities to establish whether British Muslims were involved in the terrorist attacks in Mumbai that traumatised India.

The search to track down the "British connection" in the carnage began after a number of Indian officials claimed that evidence had been found on dead and captured gunmen linking them to the UK. Senior Whitehall sources confirmed that police and the security and intelligence services were combing through information sent by Indian authorities to ascertain whether any of the group which carried out the assault were UK citizens or had visited or lived in this country.



According to one report, four of the terrorists, two of them dead, had connections with Britain. The Maharashtra Chief Minister Vilasrao Deshmukh told Associated Press that two British-born Pakistanis were among the eight gunmen arrested by Indian authorities.



However, British officials stressed they had not yet received "hard" evidence that the men were British nationals. "There is a hell of a lot going on at the minute and it is not just a matter of citizenship – that's a bit of a red herring," said one source. "We are trying to establish whether any of these men had been in this country and who they lived with, who they associated with, but it is very early days."



At least 155 people are known to have died in the multi-pronged attacks. Last night, the Indian government said the death toll could hit 200.



Britain's security agencies confirmed they were looking through intelligence on domestic suspects with overseas extremist links and reviewing tracked telephone calls to see if the "chatter" revealed British citizens were involved in the Mumbai plot. Investigators are said to be concentrating on the Kashmiri separatist group Lashkar-e-Taiba, which has previously recruited from the UK. Rashid Rauf, who was wanted in connection with a terrorist plot to blow up transatlantic airliners and was reported to have been killed recently in an American missile strike, was associated with Lashkar.



Unconfirmed reports from India stated that some of the terrorists were from Dewsbury and Bradford, areas from which some in the Muslim community had left in the past to join jihadist groups abroad. Security officials stated that all leads were be explored but stressed that no arrests had taken place in this country yet in relation to the Mumbai attacks.



Gordon Brown said: "At no point has the Prime Minister of India [Manmohan Singh] suggested ... there is evidence ... of any terrorist of British origins, but obviously these are huge investigations ... and I think it will be premature to draw any conclusions at all."



Security officials said it was looking increasingly likely that Lashkar-e-Taiba, previously known as Jaish-e-Mohammed, was involved in the attack with the militant group, Indian Mujaheddin. They played down suggestions of a direct al-Qa'ida link.



As anti-terrorist officers from Scotland Yard flew out to Mumbai, security officials urged against jumping to conclusions on documentation which may have been found on the gunmen, pointing out that they may be forged. What was crucial, said a senior source, was to establish their links in Britain and find people they had been associating with.



Ed Husain, director of the Quilliam Foundation, a think-tank that campaigns against extremism, said of the reports of British involvement in the attacks: "British Muslim leaders need to take their heads out of the sand and begin systematically dismantling the warped theology that has inspired these and other attacks. Unless our government is bolder in identifying Islamism as the root cause of extremism, we will only be responding to and not preventing terrorism. Extremist Islamist groups continue to hold events in England and recruit new followers. Radical Islamism has no place in our country."



There were still many unanswered questions last night about how many of the gunmen had been in the cell and the degree of planning they undertook before launching their operation. Indian officials said the gunmen had been arrested and were being questioned by anti-terrorism officers. Meanwhile another report, carried on the Indian NDTV news channel, suggested there may have been a total of 40 militants, 29 of them from Pakistan and the remainder from Bangladesh.



What does seem clear is that the gunmen were well-armed and well-trained. It might also be assumed that while they may have made extensive plans about the attacks, there was no plan to escape. No demands were made of the authorities and no attempt was made to use hostages to further their cause, except to cause terror. It was, in effect, a suicide mission.



Yesterday, evidence about the training and planning of the gunmen came from the commandos whose task was to confront the militants. At both the Taj Mahal and Trident-Oberoi hotels, they said it had been a game of cat-and-mouse.



"These people were very, very familiar with the hotel layouts and it appears they had carried out a survey before," said one commando, who declined to be named. He said the gunmen used their knowledge to move skillfully from place to place. "[They] showed no remorse to anybody; whoever came in front of them they fired at," he added. "They appeared to be a determined lot, wanting to create and spread terror."



The gunmen had come well-prepared. One backpack discovered by the commandos contained 400 rounds of ammunition. It is understood that some of the gunmen were carrying bags of almonds to eat during a long siege. They also had foreign currency and credit cards. Not only were they well armed with assault rifles and hand grenades, but they knew how to use them. The commando added: "It's obvious they were trained somewhere ... not everyone can handle the AK series of weapons or throw grenades like that."



Other questions will inevitably focus on how the gunmen were able to reach the coastline undetected. Some experts have suggested a lack of co-ordination between marine authorities.

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