Belfast Telegraph

Monday 22 September 2014

Monitors leave Malaysia Airlines MH17 crash site after 'intoxicated' gunman fires warning shot

A pro-Russian fighter holds up a toy found among the debris at the crash site of a Malaysia Airlines jet near the village of Hrabove, Friday, July 18, 2014. Emergency workers, police officers and even off-duty coal miners spread out Friday across the sunflower fields and villages of eastern Ukraine, searching the wreckage of a Malaysia Airlines jet shot down as it flew high above the country's battlefield. The attack Thursday afternoon killed 298 people from nearly a dozen nations. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
A pro-Russian fighter holds up a toy found among the debris at the crash site of a Malaysia Airlines jet near the village of Hrabove, Friday, July 18, 2014. Emergency workers, police officers and even off-duty coal miners spread out Friday across the sunflower fields and villages of eastern Ukraine, searching the wreckage of a Malaysia Airlines jet shot down as it flew high above the country's battlefield. The attack Thursday afternoon killed 298 people from nearly a dozen nations. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
People arrange candles to offer prayers for the victims of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17,  at a shopping mall in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Friday, July 18, 2014. The Malaysia Airlines jetliner was carrying 298 people when it was shot down over eastern Ukraine on Thursday in eastern Ukraine, sending shockwaves around the world from Malaysia to the Netherlands. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)
People arrange candles to offer prayers for the victims of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, at a shopping mall in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Friday, July 18, 2014. The Malaysia Airlines jetliner was carrying 298 people when it was shot down over eastern Ukraine on Thursday in eastern Ukraine, sending shockwaves around the world from Malaysia to the Netherlands. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)
Donetsk People's Republic fighters fill their tank with fuel at a gas station in Snizhne, 100 kilometers east of Donetsk, eastern Ukraine Thursday, July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
Donetsk People's Republic fighters fill their tank with fuel at a gas station in Snizhne, 100 kilometers east of Donetsk, eastern Ukraine Thursday, July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)

A team of international observers say they have been refused full access to the rebel-controlled Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 crash site, with one “visibly intoxicated guard” firing a warning shot into the air during their visit.

It comes as Ukraine's government accused pro-Russian rebels of trying to destroy evidence at the site where a Malaysian airliner crashed and of removing 38 bodies from the scene.

Despite being assured by rebel commanders they would ensure safe access for international experts visiting the scene where all 298 passengers aboard the flight died, the team of monitors left the site after just half an hour.

And Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) team member, Michael Bociurkiw, told journalists: "A visibly intoxicated armed guard fired his rifle in the air when one of the observers walked out of the prescribed area."

They were unable to establish an access corridor for specialist teams to investigate the area where the Boeing 777-200 fell between Krasni Luch in Luhansk region and Shakhtarsk in the neighbouring region of Donetsk.

The OSCE monitors said they could not find anyone to talk to about the plane's two black boxes and said villagers were seen removing pieces of wreckage, prompting fears crucial evidence needed to determine what, and who, is responsible for the tragedy could be tampered with.

Sergei Kavtaradze, a senior official of the pro-Russian rebels' self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic, said despite discussions, no agreement had been reached.

"There is no security zone. It is in a region near the front. There is military activity there," Kavtaradze told the Reuters news agency.

The bodies of those who died have still not been removed or tended to nearly 48 hours after the air disaster. Reports have also emerged of looting taking place as the victim’s belongings and clothes remain strewn across the fields and cornfields.

"The government of Ukraine officially states that the terrorists, with the help of Russia, are trying to destroy evidence of international crimes," the government said in a statement released today.

"According to government data, the terrorists have taken 38 bodies to the morgue in (the eastern city of) Donetsk," it said, accusing specialists with "strong Russian accents" of threatening to carry out their own autopsies.

Mr Bociurkiw said the bodies had been marked but rescue workers could not say whose job it will be to remove them.

Western based-defence specialists and intelligence specialists have also oiced fears pro-Russian separatists are hastily working to conceal any links to a Buk missile battery some suspect was used to shoot down the plane, The Guardian has reported.

Their withdrawal came as a British team of experts from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) were due to arrive in Ukraine’s capital Kiev for an investigation into the downing of the jet.

Downing Street said six investigators from the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch would join the growing international probe into exactly how the plane came to crash on Thursday, killing 298 people, including 10 Britons, nearly 200 Dutch passengers and 80 children.

Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak said the aircraft’s flight route was declared safe by the International Civil Aviation Organization.

Ukraine's government claims the plane was shot down by separatists and released an audio they claim proved this. But pro-Russian separatists deny this claim and say one of Ukraine's airforce jets was responsible.

Source: Independent

Latest News

Latest Sport

Latest Showbiz