Belfast Telegraph

Thursday 18 December 2014

Norwegian mass murderer Breivik is mad, claims lawyer Lippestrad

This is an undated image obtained from the Twitter page of Anders Behring Breivik
This is an undated image obtained from the Twitter page of Anders Behring Breivik
Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya (AP)
Wounded people are treated in the street in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris
Smoke rises from the central area of Oslo Friday, July 22, 2011 after an explosion. Terrorism ravaged long-peaceful Norway on Friday when a bomb ripped open buildings including the prime minister's office and a man dressed as a police officer opened fire at a nearby island youth camp. (AP Photo/Scanpix, Jon Bredo Overaas)
Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)
Smoke rises from central Oslo after an explosion ripped through government buildings (AP/Scanpix)
A victim is treated outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)
Medics and emergency workers escort youths from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven. (AP Photo/Morten Edvardsen/Scanpix
An aerial view of Utoya Island, Norway taken Thursday, July 21, 2011
An injured woman is helped by a passerby, in a doorway in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. The Prime Minister is not hurt
Two women are seen leaving as rescue workers arrive to help the injured following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011
Medics and emergency workers escort an injured person from a camp site on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. Investigators are still searching the surrounding waters, where people fled the attack, which followed an explosion in nearby Oslo that killed seven
A tracked high speed mist fan is used to drag a damaged vehicle away from a building in central Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents
The wreckage of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday at the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press
A victim is treated outside government buildings in the center of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents. (AP Photo/Fartein Rudjord)
In this image taken from TV smoke and flames billow from the shattered window of a building after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011. A loud explosion shattered windows Friday in several buildings including the government headquarters in Oslo which includes the prime minister's office, injuring several people. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg is safe, government spokeswoman Camilla Ryste told The Associated Press
The wreckagew of a car lies outside a building in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents.(AP Photo/Roald Berit, Scanpix, Norway)
An officer responds in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering windows and covering the street with documents and debris
The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011
The wreckage of a car lies outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2011, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office, shattering wiondows and covering the street with documents
Devastation caused after a powerful blast tore open several buildings (Holm Morten)
An aerial view of Utoya Island, where a Labour Party youth camp was attacked by a gunman (AP)
A woman walks through debris in a street following an explosion in Oslo, Norway Friday July 22, 2011. A powerful blast tore open several Oslo buildings including the prime minister's office on Friday
Victims receive treatment outside government buildings in the centre of Oslo, Friday July 22, 2010, following an explosion that tore open several buildings including the prime minister's office
The scene after an explosion in Oslo, Norway, Friday July 22, 2011

Anders Breivik's lawyer, Geir Lippestrad, has said his client is insane and appears to have no idea of the worldwide revulsion at his acts.

Lippestrad spoke after talking in jail to Breivik who told him he thought his 'operation' was going to plan.

He revealed Breivik took drugs to be "strong, efficient and awake" before launching his Oslo bomb attack and island shooting rampage that together killed 76 people.

Mr Lippestrad described Breivik, 32, as a 'very cold' person who described the attacks as necessary because he was in a state of war.

"This whole case indicated that he is insane," Mr Lippestad told a press conference.

He said that Breivik claimed that he was part of an anti-Islam network.

"He talks about two cells in Norway, but several cells abroad," said Mr Lippestad.

He said that yesterday's brief remand hearing was held behind closed doors over concerns that Breivik might send signals to other cells, if they actually exist, if the court had been open to the media.

Breivik asked Mr Lippestad how many people he killed in the attacks.

Mr Lippestad said that Breivik sees himself as a saviour.

The lawyer said that the attacks were "absurd and horrible" and did not know why Breivik picked him for his defence.

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