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Outcome too close to call as Clinton's lead shrinks dramatically

By Staff Reporter

Published 03/11/2016

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton's grip on the US presidential election has weakened with less than a week left on the clock, as new polls show the race between the Democrat and Donald Trump going down to the wire in several key swing states.

While the former Secretary of State remains the favourite to win the White House on November 8, a contest that appeared days ago to be all but over has become a nail-biter once more.

Since last Friday, when FBI Director James Comey announced the discovery of more emails potentially pertinent to the bureau's investigation of Ms Clinton's private server, her prospective electoral college lead has plummeted, according to poll averages taken by RealClearPolitics.

A week ago, the aggregator put Ms Clinton more than 100 college votes ahead of Mr Trump, with 333 to the Republican's 205 on a map where states were counted according to their more likely electoral outcome. On Tuesday, the same average of polls gave Ms Clinton just 273 votes, eight ahead of her rival's 265, and barely more than the 270 needed to claim victory.

A series of new state polls released on Wednesday by CNN/ORC in Nevada, Florida, Pennsylvania and Arizona also showed slimming margins between the two candidates, with Mr Trump taking the lead in Nevada by 49% to 43%. In mid-October, the same poll had Ms Clinton ahead by two points. In Florida, the CNN poll gave the Democrat a two-point lead, 49% to 47% - an increase of 1 percentage point on the previous poll.

The surveys, taken amid the new FBI controversy between 27 October and 1 November, suggested prospective Trump voters in both Florida and Nevada were significantly more enthusiastic than Clinton voters about casting their vote. Mr Trump spent Wednesday on the stump in the Sunshine State, with rallies in Miami, Orlando and Pensacola.

Ms Clinton, meanwhile, campaigned in Arizona and Nevada, where Democrats hope a steep uptick in Latino voter registration - energised by opposition to Mr Trump's candidacy - will translate into victory. Nevada has the fastest-growing Hispanic population of any state in the West, and Ms Clinton is thought to have taken a substantial lead in early voting there.

As the race reaches its endgame, both candidates have shifted their efforts to states that would traditionally favour their party's opponents.

Hillary Clinton's grip on the US presidential election has weakened with less than a week left on the clock, as new polls show the race between the Democrat and Donald Trump going down to the wire in several key swing states.

While the former Secretary of State remains the favourite to win the White House on November 8, a contest that appeared days ago to be all but over has become a nail-biter once more.

Since last Friday, when FBI Director James Comey announced the discovery of more emails potentially pertinent to the bureau's investigation of Ms Clinton's private server, her prospective electoral college lead has plummeted, according to poll averages taken by RealClearPolitics.

A week ago, the aggregator put Ms Clinton more than 100 college votes ahead of Mr Trump, with 333 to the Republican's 205 on a map where states were counted according to their more likely electoral outcome. On Tuesday, the same average of polls gave Ms Clinton just 273 votes, eight ahead of her rival's 265, and barely more than the 270 needed to claim victory.

A series of new state polls released on Wednesday by CNN/ORC in Nevada, Florida, Pennsylvania and Arizona also showed slimming margins between the two candidates, with Mr Trump taking the lead in Nevada by 49% to 43%. In mid-October, the same poll had Ms Clinton ahead by two points. In Florida, the CNN poll gave the Democrat a two-point lead, 49% to 47% - an increase of 1 percentage point on the previous poll.

The surveys, taken amid the new FBI controversy between 27 October and 1 November, suggested prospective Trump voters in both Florida and Nevada were significantly more enthusiastic than Clinton voters about casting their vote. Mr Trump spent Wednesday on the stump in the Sunshine State, with rallies in Miami, Orlando and Pensacola.

Ms Clinton, meanwhile, campaigned in Arizona and Nevada, where Democrats hope a steep uptick in Latino voter registration - energised by opposition to Mr Trump's candidacy - will translate into victory. Nevada has the fastest-growing Hispanic population of any state in the West, and Ms Clinton is thought to have taken a substantial lead in early voting there.

As the race reaches its endgame, both candidates have shifted their efforts to states that would traditionally favour their party's opponents.

Belfast Telegraph

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