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Paris attacks: victims and their stories

Published 20/11/2015

Tributes outside the Casa Nostra Cafe, one of the scenes of last friday's terror attacks, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Tributes outside the Casa Nostra Cafe, one of the scenes of last friday's terror attacks, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

The victims of last week's attacks in Paris had varied backgrounds and interests. They were artists and students, music lovers, parents and newlyweds.

Among the 130 killed, here are some of their stories:

  • Mayeul Gaubert, 30, was a business lawyer particularly interested in intellectual property issues. He had written his master's dissertation on the subject and contributed to a legal blog post about copyright matters after graduating and going to work for Cegos, a professional training and continuing education company.

Wounded at the Bataclan, Mr Gaubert was brought to a hospital but later died, his sister Anais, told Le Journal de Saone-et-Loire, a newspaper in central France. He had grown up in the region but was living in Paris.

Mr Gaubert earned his legal degree in 2009 from the Universite de Bourgogne, in Burgundy, according to Jurivision, a law students' group that paid homage to him on its website.

"He was, above all, a young man full of spirit, with a joyous, non-conforming nature," the group wrote.

  • Gilles Leclerc's whereabouts remained a mystery for days after the attack at the Bataclan concert hall. His partner Marianne escaped, but he seemed to have disappeared.

In the frenzied aftermath of last week's attacks, families and friends frantically searched for the missing, hoping they were not among those killed.

Nelly Leclerc, Gilles' mother, went on Europe1 radio to plea for information about her 32-year-old son's whereabouts. Gilles, known as Gillou, lived in Paris.

"We have no news," she said. The family sent photographs of Gilles - showing his distinctive tattoos - to hospitals across Paris, to police and to investigators, to no avail.

His sister set up a page called My brother Gilles Leclerc on Facebook over the weekend in hopes of finding him. She wrote: "We still haven't found Gilles this morning but the search is continuing."

On Monday his death was announced.

French soldiers patrol on the Champs-Elysees
French soldiers patrol on the Champs-Elysees
A second body is removed from the apartment raided by French Police special forces earlier in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, on November 18, 2015. AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOTS A forensic scientist of the French police searches for evidences in the appartment raided by French Police special forces earlier in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, on November 18, 2015, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. French police said the assault had concluded on an apartment in northern Paris in which at least two jihadists were killed and seven arrested. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images
Bullet holes are pictured around a window on the back side of the house after an intervention of security forces against a group of extremists in Saint-Denis, near Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. A woman wearing an explosive suicide vest blew herself up Wednesday as heavily armed police tried to storm a suburban Paris apartment where the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks was believed to be holed up, police said. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
Bullet holes and smashed windows are pictured on the back side of the house after an intervention of security forces against a group of extremists in Saint-Denis, near Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. A woman wearing an explosive suicide vest blew herself up Wednesday as heavily armed police tried to storm a suburban Paris apartment where the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks was believed to be holed up, police said. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
Two men carry a stretcher with a dead body into a hearse after an intervention of security forces against a group of extremists in Saint-Denis, near Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. A woman wearing an explosive suicide vest blew herself up Wednesday as heavily armed police tried to storm a suburban Paris apartment where the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks was believed to be holed up, police said. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
A forensic expert walks from the scene in Saint-Denis, near Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. A woman wearing an explosive suicide vest blew herself up Wednesday as heavily armed police tried to storm a suburban Paris apartment where the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks was believed to be holed up, police said. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
French police have cordened off the area outside a building in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, on November 18, 2015, where French Police special forces earlier raided an appartment, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. French police said the assault had concluded on an apartment in northern Paris on Wednesday in which at least two jihadists were killed and seven arrested. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERGERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images
A body is removed from the apartment raided by French Police special forces earlier in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, on November 18, 2015, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. French police said the assault had concluded on an apartment in northern Paris in which at least two jihadists were killed and seven arrested. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERGERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images
A forensic scientist (Top-R) of the French police searches for evidence in the apartment raided by French Police special forces earlier in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, on November 18, 2015, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. French police said the assault had concluded on an apartment in northern Paris in which at least two jihadists were killed and seven arrested. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images
SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 18: Forensics of the french police are seen in front of the '8, Rue du Corbillon' on November 18, 2015 in Saint-Denis, France. French Police special forces raid an appartment, hunting those behind the attacks that killed 129 persons five days ago. Two people were killed in an apartment targeted in the operation aimed at the suspected mastermind of the attacks, Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud, and police were wounded in the shootout. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 18: The damaged building that was raided earlier in the morning is pictured on November 18, 2015 in Saint-Denis, France. French Police special forces raided an apartment, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. At least one person was killed in an apartment targeted during the operation aimed at the suspected mastermind of the attacks, Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. At least five police officers have been wounded in the shootout. (Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images)
SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 18: A Police Forensic officer works in the damaged building that was raided earlier in the morning is pictured on November 18, 2015 in Saint-Denis, France. French Police special forces raided an apartment, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. At least one person was killed in an apartment targeted during the operation aimed at the suspected mastermind of the attacks, Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. At least five police officers have been wounded in the shootout. (Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images)
SAINT-DENIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 18: A view of Rue des Corbillon in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis following a raid on an apartment on November 18, 2015 in Saint-Denis, France. French Police special forces raided an apartment, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. At least one person was killed in an apartment targeted during the operation aimed at the suspected mastermind of the attacks, Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud. At least five police officers have been wounded in the shootout. (Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images)
Police forces prepare in St. Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of St. Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Special police forces walk through Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Police say two suspects in last week's Paris attacks, a man and a woman, have been killed in a police operation north of the capital. Two police officers have been injured in the standoff. Police have said the operation is targeting the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks, believed to be holed up in an apartment in Saint-Denis with several other heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Chistophe Ena)
Police and Ambulance vans are parked in Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Police say two suspects in last week's Paris attacks, a man and a woman, have been killed in a police operation north of the capital. Two police officers have been injured in the standoff. Police have said the operation is targeting the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks, believed to be holed up in an apartment in Saint-Denis with several other heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A police officer checks identity documents to enter the perimeter of the Elysee Palace, or presidential residence, in Paris, Wednesday, Nov.18, 2015. The Paris prosecutors office says Wednesday that SWAT teams have arrested three people in an apartment in Saint-Denis, outside Paris, and where police are in a standoff with suspects in last weeks Paris attacks. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
A special intervention unit moves towards the scene in Paris suburb Saint-Denis, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Explosions and gunfire rang out early Wednesday as heavily armed police surrounded a suburban Paris apartment in a raid targeting the suspected mastermind of last week's Paris attacks. At least two people were killed and two arrested. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Police and Ambulance vans are parked in Saint-Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Police say two suspects in last week's Paris attacks, a man and a woman, have been killed in a police operation north of the capital. Two police officers have been injured in the standoff. Police have said the operation is targeting the suspected mastermind of last week's attacks, believed to be holed up in an apartment in Saint-Denis with several other heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Residents are evacuated by the police in Saint Denis, north of Paris, France, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of Saint Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Police forces prepare in St. Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of St. Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Soldiers operate in St. Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of St. Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Police forces prepare in St. Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of St. Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
French policemen and soldiers stand guard in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis city center, on November 18, 2015, as French Police special forces raid an appartment, hunting those behind the attacks that claimed 129 lives in the French capital five days ago. At least one person was killed in an apartment targeted in the operation aimed at the suspected mastermind of the attacks, Belgian Abdelhamid Abaaoud, and police had been wounded in the shootout. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Soldiers operate in St. Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of St. Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Police forces prepare in St. Denis, a northern suburb of Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. Authorities in the Paris suburb of St. Denis are telling residents to stay inside during a large police operation near France's national stadium that two officials say is linked to last week's deadly attacks. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A French soldier enforcing the Vigipirate plan, France's national security alert system, is pictured on November 17, 2015 in Paris in front of the Eiffel Tower, which is illuminated with the colors of the French national flag in tribute to the victims of the November 13 Paris terror attacks. AFP/Getty Images
A photo taken on November 17, 2015 in Paris shows the moon shining over the building of the French National Assembly (L) illuminated with the French national colors in tribute to the victims of the November 13 Paris terror attacks. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images
People gather around the Monument a la Republique at the Place de la Republique square on November 17, 2015 in Paris, to pay tribute to the victims of the attacks of November 13. Gunmen and suicide bombers went on a killing spree in Paris on November 13, attacking a concert hall, bars, restaurants and the Stade de France. Islamic State jihadists operating out of Iraq and Syria released a statement claiming responsibility for the coordinated attacks that killed 129 people and left 352 others injured. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 17: The words 'Liberte, Igalite, Fraternite' and the colours of the French flag adorn Wembley Stadium ahead of tonight's football match between England and France on November 17, 2015 in London, England. Security in London has tightened after a series of terror attacks across the French capital of Paris on Friday, leaving at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: US Capitol Police Officer Oluwaseun Adenuga stands guard in front of a entrance to the US Capitol, November 17, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Islamic State recently released a video this morning threatening additional attacks in the nation's capital following Friday's attacks in Paris, though over the weekend an F.B.I. spokesman issued a release saying, At this time, there is no specific or credible threat to the United States. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: A US Capitol Police Officer stands guard in front of the US Capitol, November 17, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Islamic State recently released a video this morning threatening additional attacks in the nation's capital following Friday's attacks in Paris, though over the weekend an F.B.I. spokesman issued a release saying, At this time, there is no specific or credible threat to the United States. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: Members of the US Capitol Police Bomb Squad patrol the grounds of the US Capitol, November 17, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Islamic State recently released a video this morning threatening additional attacks in the nation's capital following Friday's attacks in Paris, though over the weekend an F.B.I. spokesman issued a release saying, At this time, there is no specific or credible threat to the United States. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 17: French supporters hold a banner to appreciate the support following the terror attack in Paris prior to the International Friendly match between England and France at Wembley Stadium on November 17, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)
A woman stands in front of a makeshift memorial made up with flowers, candles and messages, on November 17, 2015, at the Place de la Republique square in Paris, in tribute to victims of the attacks claimed by Islamic State which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13 in Paris. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
A photo taken on November 16, 2015 in Paris shows the Eiffel Tower illuminated with the colours of the French national flag in tribute to the victims of November 13 Paris terror attacks which killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERGERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images
A flag of France is surrounded by candles and flowers outside of the French embassy in Mexico City during a vigil for the victims of the terrorist attacks in Paris, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. Multiple attacks across Paris on Friday left scores dead and hundreds injured. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
People stand next to a makeshift memorial outside"Le petit Cambodge" restaurant, at the site of the attacks in Paris, on November 17, 2015 in tribute to the victims of the attacks claimed by Islamic State which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
French President Francois Hollande arrives for a speech at an exceptional joint gathering of Parliament in Versailles on November 16, 2015, three days after 129 people were killed in the worst terrorist attack in France's history.
A miniature Eiffel tower, candles and flowers are seen at a makeshift memorial outside "Le Carillon cafe" at the corner of Rue Bichat and Alibert in the 10th arrondissement and "Le petit Cambodge" restaurant, at the site of the attacks in Paris, on November 17, 2015 in tribute to the victims of the attacks claimed by Islamic State which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
The French national flag, candles and flowers are seen on November 17, 2015 at a makeshift memorial in front of the "Le petit Cambodge" restaurant in Paris, in tribute to the victims of the attacks claimed by Islamic State which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 16: A hand-written message in French reads: "I am Paris!" among candles, messages and flowers left by mourners outside the French Embassy commemorating the victims of last Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris that have left over 130 people dead on November 16, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Police are feverishly tracking down leads across Europe and looking for one of the attackers they think is still alive and on the run. The Islamic State (IS) has claimed responsibility for the attacks that were carried out by at least eight terrorists. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 16: A hand-written message reads: "I love Paris" among candles, messages and flowers left by mourners outside the French Embassy commemorating the victims of last Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris that have left over 130 people dead on November 16, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Police are feverishly tracking down leads across Europe and looking for one of the attackers they think is still alive and on the run. The Islamic State (IS) has claimed responsibility for the attacks that were carried out by at least eight terrorists. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 16: People look at candles, messages and flowers left by mourners outside the French Embassy commemorating the victims of last Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris that have left over 130 people dead on November 16, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Police are feverishly tracking down leads across Europe and looking for one of the attackers they think is still alive and on the run. The Islamic State (IS) has claimed responsibility for the attacks that were carried out by at least eight terrorists. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Police officers man a cordon as an operation takes place in the Molenbeek district of Brussels on November 16, 2015. Belgian police launched a major new operation in the Brussels district of Molenbeek, where several suspects in the Paris attacks had previously lived, AFP journalists said. Armed police stood in front of a police van blocking a street in the run-down area of the capital while Belgian media said officers had surrounded a house. Belgian prosecutors had no immediate comment. AFP PHOTO / JOHN THYSJOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images
People gather around candles left in the shape of the word 'Peace' reflected through large mirror panels on November 16, 2015 on the old Harbour in Marseille, as thousands of people pay tribute to victims of the November 13 attacks in Paris. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris that killed at least 128 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVATBORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images
A French soldier enforcing the Vigipirate plan, France's national security alert system, patrols in front of the Sacre Coeur Basilica on November 16, 2015 in Paris, three days after a series of deadly coordinated attacks claimed by Islamic State jihadists, which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13. AFP PHOTO/JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images
The arch of London's Wembley Stadium is illuminated with the colours of the French national flag with French flags flanking the Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite moto of France in west London on November 16, 2015, as Britons express their solidarity following a spate of coordinated attacks in Paris on November 13 that left at least 129 people dead. Armed police will be deployed around London's Wembley Stadium at an international friendly between England and France on November 17 as part of increased security measures following the Paris attacks, a senior officer said. AFP PHOTO / ADRIAN DENNISADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images
Police officers man a cordon as an operation takes place in the Molenbeek district of Brussels on November 16, 2015. Belgian police launched a major new operation in the Brussels district of Molenbeek, where several suspects in the Paris attacks had previously lived, AFP journalists said. Armed police stood in front of a police van blocking a street in the run-down area of the capital while Belgian media said officers had surrounded a house. Belgian prosecutors had no immediate comment.. AFP PHOTO / BELGA / BENOIT DOPPAGNEBENOIT DOPPAGNE/AFP/Getty Images
Picture - Kevin Scott Belfast , UK - NOVEMBER 16 : Lord Mayor Arder Carson, Book of Condolence opened for French victims at Belfast City Hall in Belfast, Northern Ireland on November 16 (Photo by Kevin Scott )
Picture - Kevin Scott Belfast , UK - NOVEMBER 16 : Lord Mayor Arder Carson opens the Book of Condolence opened for French victims at Belfast City Hall in Belfast, Northern Ireland on November 16 (Photo by Kevin Scott )
This picture shows a general view of tributes laid to victims of the Paris attacks at the foot of the Monument a La Republique in Paris on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
People light candles amongst tributes laid to victims of the Paris attacks at the foot of the Monument a La Republique in Paris on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
A man lights a candle amongst tributes laid to victims of the Paris attacks at the foot of the Monument a La Republique in Paris on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
People light candles amongst tributes laid to victims of the Paris attacks at the foot of the Monument a La Republique in Paris on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
A woman lights a candle amongst tributes laid to victims of the Paris attacks at the foot of the Monument a La Republique in Paris on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
The makeshift memorial in tribute to the victims of the Paris attacks is pictured in the evening, on November 15, 2015 at the La Belle Equipe rue de Charonne, 11th arrondissement, of the French capital. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 130 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
The makeshift memorial in tribute to the victims of the Paris attacks is pictured at night on November 15, 2015 at the Le Carillon cafe seen from Rue Alibert in the 10th arrondissement of the French capital. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
People gather at the makeshift memorial in tribute to the victims of the Paris attacks late on November 15, 2015 at the Petit Cambodge cafe Rue Alibert in the 10th arrondissement of the French Capital. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 130 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
Two men stand at the makeshift memorial in tribute to the victims of the Paris attacks late on November 15, 2015 at the Le Carillon cafe at the corner of Rue Bichat and Alibert in the 10th arrondissement of the French Capital. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 130 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURELIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
People gather at the Pouvanaa a Oopa Monument, in Papeete in front of the Assembly of French Polynesia, on November 15, 2015, to pay tribute to the victims of attacks in the French capital Paris on November 13, in which over 130 people died and more than 350 were injured. Hundreds of meters of flower garlands were made for the remembrance and a minute of silence was held. AFP PHOTO / GREGORY BOISYYGREGORY BOISSY/AFP/Getty Images
A woman ligghts a candle as people gather at the Pouvanaa a Oopa Monument, in Papeete in front of the Assembly of French Polynesia, on November 15, 2015, to pay tribute to the victims of attacks in the French capital Paris on November 13, in which over 130 people died and more than 350 were injured. Hundreds of meters of flower garlands were made for the remembrance and a minute of silence was held. AFP PHOTO / GREGORY BOISYYGREGORY BOISSY/AFP/Getty Images
People lay flowers and garlands as they gather at the Pouvanaa a Oopa Monument, in Papeete in front of the Assembly of French Polynesia, on November 15, 2015, to pay tribute to the victims of attacks in the French capital Paris on November 13, in which over 130 people died and more than 350 were injured. Hundreds of meters of flower garlands were made for the remembrance and a minute of silence was held. AFP PHOTO / GREGORY BOISYYGREGORY BOISSY/AFP/Getty Images
People gather at the Pouvanaa a Oopa Monument, in Papeete in front of the Assembly of French Polynesia, on November 15, 2015, to pay tribute to the victims of attacks in the French capital Paris on November 13, in which over 130 people died and more than 350 were injured. Hundreds of meters of flower garlands were made for the remembrance and a minute of silence was held. AFP PHOTO / GREGORY BOISYYGREGORY BOISSY/AFP/Getty Images
Tributes continue to be left near the Casa Nostra restaurant in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left near the Bataclan concert hall in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left at the Casa Nostra restaurant in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left near the Bataclan concert hall in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Tributes continue to be left near the Casa Nostra restaurant in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left near the Bataclan concert hall in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left at the Casa Nostra restaurant in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left near the Bataclan concert hall in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes continue to be left outside Le Carillon bar in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Tributes continue to be left near the Casa Nostra restaurant in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
EDITORS NOTE CONTENT Floral tributes continue to be left near the Bataclan concert hall in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
People look at floral tributes and candles left at Place de la Republique in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
People look at floral tributes and candles left at Place de la Republique in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
A woman joins crowds looking at floral tributes and candles left at Place de la Republique in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Floral tributes and candles left at Place de la Republique in Paris following the terrorist attacks on Friday evening. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday November 16, 2015. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
French flags fly at half-mast to remember the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks ahead of a vigil in Melbourne on 16 November 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / Paul CrockPAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images
People listen to speakers at a vigil to remember the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks in Melbourne on 16 November 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / Paul CrockPAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images
People lay flowers and placards after a vigil to remember the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks in Melbourne on 16 November 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / Paul CrockPAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images
A woman looks at the condolences book in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks outside the French embassy in Singapore on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMANROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images
Messages and flowers are seen in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy as a little girl walk past in Singapore on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMANROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images
Messages and flowers are seen in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy in Singapore on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMANROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images
A message and flowers are seen in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy in Singapore on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMANROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images
Messages and flowers are seen in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy in Singapore on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMANROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images
Messages and flowers are seen in tribute to the victims of Paris attacks outside the French Embassy in Singapore on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / ROSLAN RAHMANROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty Images
Flowers lie outside the Embassy of France in Canberra on November 16, 2015. Members of the diplomatic corps in Australia attended to observe a minute's silence and sign the book in memory of those killed in the Paris terror attacks. AFP PHOTO / Alan PORRITTALAN PORRITT/AFP/Getty Images
Members of the local French community arrive to sign the condolence book at the Embassy of France in Canberra on November 16, 2015. Members of the diplomatic corps in Australia attended to observe a minute's silence and sign the book in memory of those killed in the Paris terror attacks. AFP PHOTO / Alan PORRITTALAN PORRITT/AFP/Getty Images
People place candles at the French embassy in Guatemala City, during a ceremony Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015, in homage to the victims of the deadly attacks in Paris. Multiple terrorist attacks across Paris on Friday night left more than one hundred dead and many more injured. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
A woman reacts, in front of the restaurant Le Carillon, one of the establishments targeted in Friday's gun and bomb attacks, in Paris, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. French police raided more than 150 locations overnight as authorities released the names of two more potential suicide bombers involved in the Paris attacks one born in Syria, the other a Frenchman wanted as part of a terrorism investigation. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
A man is detained by a police officer after a raid in the Mirail district in Toulouse, southwestern France, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. France's Prime Minister Manuel Valls says there have been 150 police raids overnight in the country. (AP Photo) FRANCE OUT
An Eiffel Tower statue is placed among flowers and candles outside the Le Carillon restaurant, one of the establishments targeted in Friday's gun and bomb attacks, in Paris, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. French police raided more than 150 locations overnight as authorities released the names of two more potential suicide bombers involved in the Paris attacks one born in Syria, the other a Frenchman wanted as part of a terrorism investigation. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
French ambassador to Pakistan Martine Dorance (C), Pakistan's Defence Minister Khawaja Asif (C-L) and staff members attend a minute of silence in tribute to victims of the November 13 Paris attacks, at the French Embassy in Islamabad on November 16, 2015. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris that killed at least 130 people in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / Aamir QURESHIAAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images
Indian school children light candles during a vigil at a school in Siliguri on November 16, 2015, following coordinated terror attacks in the French capital Paris. Islamic State jihadists claimed a series of coordinated attacks by gunmen and suicide bombers in Paris on November 13 that killed at least 129 people and injured 352 in scenes of carnage at a concert hall, restaurants and the national stadium. AFP PHOTO / Diptendu DUTTADIPTENDU DUTTA/AFP/Getty Images
A message reads " We are united " amount flowers and candles on the ground outside the French embassy in Berlin, on November 16, 2015 three days after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left at least 129 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / JOHN MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
A message reads " We are all Parisians - Berlin loves Paris " amount flowers and candles on the ground outside the French embassy in Berlin, on November 16, 2015 three days after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left at least 129 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / JOHN MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
A message reads " Peace " in several languages around the #PeaceForParis logo created by French graphic designer Jean Jullien amount flowers and candles on the ground outside the French embassy in Berlin, on November 16, 2015 three days after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left at least 129 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / JOHN MACDOUGALLJOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images
A drawing showing the French and the German flag is laid down on November 16, 2015 with flowers and candles in front of the French consulate general in Duesseldorf, western Germany, in solidarity with French people after the attacks in Paris. AFP PHOTO / DPA / MONIKA SKOLIMOWSKA +++ GERMANY OUT +++MONIKA SKOLIMOWSKA/AFP/Getty Images
Floral tributes and messages lie at the police cordon in front of the Bataclan concert hall in Paris on November 16, 2015 , three days after terrorist attacks left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAYBERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images
Floral tributes and messages lie at the police cordon in front of the Bataclan concert hall in Paris on November 16, 2015 , three days after terrorist attacks left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAYBERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images
Flowers and a drawing reading "We are mourning you, and we will stand for you !" are pictured near the cordoned off crime scene of the Bataclan concert hall on November 16, 2015 in Paris, three days after the terrorist attacks that left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAYBERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images
Flowers and a note in the French national colors, reading France's motto "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" is pictured near the cordoned off crime scene of the Bataclan concert hall on November 16, 2015 in Paris, three days after the terrorist attacks that left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / BERTRAND GUAYBERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images
People spend a moment mourning the dead at the site of the attack at the Cafe Belle Equipe on rue de Charonne, prior to going to work early on November 16, 2015 in Paris, three days after the terrorist attacks that left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
A woman spends a moment mourning the dead at the site of the attack at the Cafe Belle Equipe on rue de Charonne in the 11th district, prior to going to work early on November 16, 2015 in Paris, three days after the terrorist attacks that left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
French flags and a note reading "We will not let you spoil our children's lives" at the site of the attack at the Cafe Belle Equipe on rue de Charonne in the 11th district, early on November 16, 2015 in Paris, three days after the terrorist attacks that left over 130 dead and more than 350 injured. France prepared to fall silent at noon on November 16 to mourn victims of the Paris attacks after its warplanes pounded the Syrian stronghold of Islamic State, the jihadist group that has claimed responsibility for the slaughter. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the Sydney Catholic and French community gather for mass at St Mary's Cathedral in honour of victims and those affected by recent terror attacks in Paris on November 16, 2015 in Sydney, Australia. 129 people died and hundreds were injured in Paris on Friday following a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Flowers and tributes are left at the base of the Statue de Marianne at the Place de la Republique as a mark of respect to the victims of the Paris terror attacks last Friday, on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. There will be a Europe-wide one-minute silence at 12pm CET today in honour of the 129 people who were killed last Friday in a series of terror attacks in the French capital. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: Tears run down the face of a lady as people gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People gather for a vigil to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Messages are left on the window of La Belle Equipe cafeon Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 16: Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. France, currently observing three days of national mourning, will fall silent for one minute at 12pm local time today in an expression of solidarity with the victims of the terrorist attacks, which left at least 129 people dead and hundreds more injured. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Members of the public look at floral tributes and messages at La Belle Equipe cafe on Rue de Charonne following Friday's terrorist attack on November 16, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 16: People lay a memorial to honour victims of the Paris terror attacks at Federation Square on November 16, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. 129 people were killed in Paris following a series of terrorist acts in the French capital on Friday night. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
People light candles at a vigil held by the local French community in Sydney on November 14, 2015, as Australians express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. Both the Opera House and the Sydney Town Hall were bathed in the French colours and New South Wales state Premier Mike Baird said he had also asked for a French flag to fly over the city's famous harbour bridge. AFP/Getty Images
A woman weeps at a vigil held by the local French community in Sydney on November 14, 2015, as Australians express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. Both the Opera House and the Sydney Town Hall were bathed in the French colours and New South Wales state Premier Mike Baird said he had also asked for a French flag to fly over the city's famous harbour bridge. AFP PHOTO / William WEST WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
Racegoers observe a minutes silence for the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks during day two of The Open meeting, at Cheltenham Racecourse. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday November 14, 2015. See PA story RACING Cheltenham. Photo credit should read: Tim Goode/PA Wire
Flowers are laid for the victims of the Paris attacks outside the French embassy in The Hague, on November 14, 2015, a day after a string of attacks on the French capital Paris. France was in a nationwide state of emergency Saturday after a night of horror in Paris when gunmen sprayed restaurants with bullets, massacred scores of concert-goers and launched suicide attacks near the national stadium, killing at least 120 people. AFP PHOTO/ ANP / ALEXANDER SCHIPPERS =NETHERLANDS OUT=ALEXANDER SCHIPPERS/AFP/Getty Images
French gendarmes patrol with a police dog outside of the Saint-Exupery Airport near Lyon on November 14, 2015, following a series of terrorist attacks in Paris, resulting in the death of at least 128 individuals and a national state of emergency. European capitals reinforced security checks as governments held emergency cabinet meetings on November 14 a day after a series of coordinated attacks in Paris in which at least 128 people were killed. AFP PHOTO/PHILIPPE DESMAZESPHILIPPE DESMAZES/AFP/Getty Images
Police and customs officers control vehicles on November 14, 2015 at the France-Belgium border at Neuville-en-Ferrain, following terrorist attacks in Paris resulting in the death of at least 128 individuals and declaration of a state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / DENIS CHARLETDENIS CHARLET/AFP/Getty Images
French vigipirate soldiers patrol at the airport of Mérignac, southwestern France on November 14, 2015, following a series of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, which left more than 120 people dead. AFP PHOTO / JEAN PIERRE MULLERJEAN-PIERRE MULLER/AFP/Getty Images
A women shows emotion outside Le Carillon bar, Paris, one of the venues for the attacks in the French capital which are feared to have killed around 127 people. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Saturday November 14, 2015. A state of emergency has been declared in France after a night of horror in the capital. There were two suicide attacks and a bombing near the Stade de France stadium, shootings at restaurants and a massacre inside a popular music venue in what is the worst violence to hit France since the Second World War. See PA story POLICE Paris. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
People light candles at a vigil held by the local French community in Sydney on November 14, 2015, as Australians express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. Both the Opera House and the Sydney Town Hall were bathed in the French colours and New South Wales state Premier Mike Baird said he had also asked for a French flag to fly over the city's famous harbour bridge. AFP PHOTO / William WESTWILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
People light candles at a vigil held by the local French community in Sydney on November 14, 2015, as Australians express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. Both the Opera House and the Sydney Town Hall were bathed in the French colours and New South Wales state Premier Mike Baird said he had also asked for a French flag to fly over the city's famous harbour bridge. AFP PHOTO / William WESTWILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
People sing the national anthem at a vigil held by the local French community in Sydney on November 14, 2015, as Australians express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. Both the Opera House and the Sydney Town Hall were bathed in the French colours and New South Wales state Premier Mike Baird said he had also asked for a French flag to fly over the city's famous harbour bridge. AFP PHOTO / William WESTWILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
A woman weeps at a vigil held by the local French community in Sydney on November 14, 2015, as Australians express their solidarity with France following a spate of coordinated attacks that left 128 dead and 180 injured in Paris late on November 13. Both the Opera House and the Sydney Town Hall were bathed in the French colours and New South Wales state Premier Mike Baird said he had also asked for a French flag to fly over the city's famous harbour bridge. AFP PHOTO / William WEST WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
French President Francois Hollande, left, welcomes Tunisia's President Beji Caid Essebsi at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, Saturday Nov. 14 , 2015. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
People line up to give blood at the St Louis hospital across the street from the Petit Cambodge restaurant in Paris Saturday Nov. 14, 2015, a day after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A man places flowers outside the French Embassy in Berlin on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left more than 120 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / TOBIAS SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
Candles are placed outside the French Embassy to form "Paris" in Berlin on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left more than 120 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / TOBIAS SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
Candles are placed outside the French Embassy to form "Paris" in Berlin on November 14, 2015, a day after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left more than 120 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / TOBIAS SCHWARZTOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
Men place candles to a question mark in front of the French embassy on November 14, 2015 in Prague a day after deadly attacks in Paris. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left more than 120 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / MICHAL CIZEKMICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images
The front pages of some of Swedens daily newspapers showing pictures and headlines from the attacks in Paris are pictured in Stockholm, on November 14, 2015. The string of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, 2015 left more than 120 people dead, in the worst such violence in France's history. AFP PHOTO / JONATHAN NACKSTRANDJONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images
People place flowers and candles in front of the monument at the Place de la Republique in Paris on November 14, 2015, following a series of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, which left more than 120 people dead. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGETDOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images
A young woman reacts in front of flowers and candles placed at the monument at the Place de la Republique in Paris on November 14, 2015, following a series of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late November 13, which left more than 120 people dead. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGETDOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images
French soldiers patrol the area surrounding the Assemblee Nationale in Paris on November 14, 2015 following a series of coordinated attacks in and around Paris late Friday which left more than 120 people dead. French President Francois Hollande blamed the Islamic State group for the attacks in Paris that left at least 128 dead, calling them an "act of war". The multiple attacks across the city late Friday were "an act of war... committed by a terrorist army, the Islamic State, against France, against... what we are, a free country," Hollande said. AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOTFRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images
A man plays piano near the cordened off area around the Bataclan theatre in the 11th district of Paris on November 14, 2015, after a series of attacks on the city resulting in the deaths of at least 120 individuals. More than a hundred people were gunned down at the Bataclan theatre in Paris late Friday during a concert by the US band Eagles of Death Metal. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOTS People are being evacuated on rue Oberkampf near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris, early on November 14, 2015. At least 120 people were killed in a series of terror attacks in Paris on November 13 according to a provisional total, a source close to the investigation said. AFP PHOTO / MIGUEL MEDINAMIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/Getty Images
The One World Trade Center spire is lit blue, white and red after New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the lighting in honor of dozens killed in the Paris attacks Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, in New York. French officials say several dozen people have been killed in shootings and explosions at a theater, restaurant and elsewhere in Paris. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)
TOPSHOTS A victim lies on the ground covered by a white sheet following an attack at rue Bichat, in central Paris, on November 14, 2015. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall Friday and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK FIFEFRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOTS Soldiers walk in front of an ambulance as rescue workers evacuate victims near La Belle Equipe, rue de Charonne, at the site of an attack on Paris on November 14, 2015 after a series of gun attacks occurred across Paris as well as explosions outside the national stadium where France was hosting Germany. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / PIERRE CONSTANTPIERRE CONSTANT/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOTS Rescuers evacuate an injured person near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris, early on November 14, 2015. At least 120 people were killed in a series of terror attacks in Paris on November 13 according to a provisional total, a source close to the investigation said. AFP PHOTO / MIGUEL MEDINAMIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOTS A photo taken on November 14, 2015 shows the Bataclan cafe near the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall on November 13 and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAUMARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images
Forensic experts (Rear L) and special police work at the attack scene rue Bichat, in central Paris, early on November 14, 2015. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall late on November 13 and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK FIFEFRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images
A forensic expert (Rear L in white) and special police work at the attack scene rue Bichat, in central Paris, early on November 14, 2015. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall late on November 13 and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK FIFEFRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images
Soldiers and police officers secure the area near La Belle Equipe, rue de Charonne, at the site of an attack on Paris on November 14, 2015 after a series of gun attacks occurred across Paris as well as explosions outside the national stadium where France was hosting Germany. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / PIERRE CONSTANTPIERRE CONSTANT/AFP/Getty Images
Soldiers secure the area near La Belle Equipe, rue de Charonne, at the site of an attack on Paris on November 14, 2015 after a series of gun attacks occurred across Paris as well as explosions outside the national stadium where France was hosting Germany. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / PIERRE CONSTANTPIERRE CONSTANT/AFP/Getty Images
Soldiers and police officers secure the area near La Belle Equipe, rue de Charonne, at the site of an attack on Paris on November 14, 2015 after a series of gun attacks occurred across Paris as well as explosions outside the national stadium where France was hosting Germany. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / PIERRE CONSTANTPIERRE CONSTANT/AFP/Getty Images
Soldiers walk in front of an ambulance as rescue workers evacuate victims near La Belle Equipe, rue de Charonne, at the site of an attack on Paris on November 14, 2015 after a series of gun attacks occurred across Paris as well as explosions outside the national stadium where France was hosting Germany. More than 100 people were killed in a mass hostage-taking at a Paris concert hall and many more were feared dead in a series of bombings and shootings, as France declared a national state of emergency. AFP PHOTO / PIERRE CONSTANTPIERRE CONSTANT/AFP/Getty Images
A victim under a blanket lays dead outside the Bataclan theater in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. Well over 100 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions explosions. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
People light candles at a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered "all of Canada's support" to France on Friday night in the wake of "deeply worrying" terrorist attacks in Paris. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press via AP)
Police officer secure the area near the Stade de France stadium after an explosion and after international friendly soccer match France against Germany, in Saint Denis, outside Paris, early Saturday Nov. 14, 2015. Multiple fatal attacks throughout the city have prompted President Francois Hollande to announce he was closing the country's borders and declaring a state of emergency. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
A victim is evacuated after a shooting, near the Bataclan theater in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. Well over 100 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions explosions. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
A person is being evacuated after a shooting, outside the Bataclan theater in Paris, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. A series of attacks targeting young concert-goers, soccer fans and Parisians enjoying a Friday night out at popular nightspots killed over 100 people in the deadliest violence to strike France since World War II.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
People rest on a bench after being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
French President Francois Hollande arrives to visit the site of the the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins says the death toll in attacks at six sites around the French capital could exceed 120. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A person is being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A person is being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Victims walk away outside the Bataclan theater in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. Well over 100 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions explosions. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)
Rescue workers help a woman after a shooting, outside the Bataclan theater in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A man is being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A man is being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A woman is being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A woman is being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
People rest on a bench after being evacuated from the Bataclan theater after a shooting in Paris, Friday Nov. 13, 2015. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

"We are sad to announce that Gillou has been found dead, unfortunately. Thank you for your support, your expressions and your help in the search."

  • Eric Thome, 39, was an artist, fan of music and father with a five-year-old daughter and another child on the way when he died during the attack at Bataclan concert hall.

Mr Thome and a partner were running their own Paris design studio after working in the advertising business for years.

The studio specialised in bold, fanciful, often daring illustrations and photographs. Among the art displayed on its website was a whimsical illustration of a Kalashnikov assault rifle that looks like a plastic toy covered in cartoon-like drawings. Its stock says in bold letters: "It's not my war."

"He was an artist, always hip, a party guy who loved music," a friend was quoted as saying by Le Parisien. "He was full of joie de vivre and adored his kid."

His second child was due in weeks, Le Parisien said on its website.

  • Cedric Gomet, 30, of Paris, was a technician for French television network TV5Monde, which posted a video showing a moment of silence being observed in his memory at the station, with employees holding photos of him in their hands.

Co-worker Eric Krissi said Gomet was roundly adored by everyone at the station. "Everyone loved him. He was always smiling ... a true professional, truly appreciated."

Mr Gomet, who began working at the station about five years ago, was passionate about rock music and played guitar in a local band. He died at the Bataclan.

Mr Krissi said Gomet's family and girlfriend are in deep shock over his death

  • Sven Silva was the kind of guy people remembered, and not just because of his flamboyant bushy afro hairstyle.

The 29-year-old Venezuelan could make a joke out of anything, and never said no to a good time, childhood friend Anders Borges said.

"If there was a party, he was there. He'd even go to my parent's birthday parties," Mr Borges said. "He was the one who always cheered us up, who made the jokes, who made sure everything went well. We looked to him in good times and we looked to him in the bad times, too."

Like many middle-class Venezuelans, Mr Silva decided to leave the economically struggling South American country after graduating from college. He moved with his younger sister to Ireland in 2014 to study English, and then settled in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, where he worked as a computer programmer, Mr Borges said.

Last week, Mr Silva travelled to Paris to meet up with two old friends, fellow Venezuelans now living in Europe, and decided to head to a show at the Bataclan.

His mother, Giovanina Perugini, said in a Facebook post that the family would remember Mr Silva's smile, jokes, optimism and charisma.

She had visited her son in Spain a week before the attacks, Borges said. The family was planning to celebrate Christmas together. Silva would have been the life of the party, Mr Borges said.

  • A man of many talents and interests, Olivier Hauducoeur died doing one of the things he loved: listening to a rock concert. He was among the victims of the terrorist attack at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris.

Mr Hauducoeur, a banker, worked for the BNP Paribas Group. Outside of work, he liked to play guitar, enjoyed badminton, and belonged to an athletic club in Yerres, the Paris suburb where he lived, according to the profile he created in Copains d'avant, a website for connecting with old chums.

His profile said he was married with two children. He also ran cross-country, according to the website of L'Express news magazine. Travels had taken him around Europe, to North Africa and the United States, according to his Copains d'avant profile.

  • Minutes before gunmen stormed the Bataclan, Manu Perez, 40, of Paris posted on his Facebook page: He was enjoying the concert there by Eagles of Death Metal, he said, in "all its simplicity".

The California-based rock band, whose members survived the attack, said in a statement that Mr Perez would be remembered as one of their "record company comrades."

Pascal Negre, president of Universal Music France, Mr Perez's employer, said via Twitter that the Universal Music family was "in mourning" over the deaths of Manu and two colleagues. Apparently it was one of those colleagues, Thomas Ayad, who provided Mr Perez with the tickets to attend the concert at the Bataclan.

Mr Perez's last Facebook posting was a photo of the Eagles performing at the Bataclan just before the attack. The time was 9.03pm.

The photo posted less than an hour before was of a pair of concert tickets, with a message from Mr Perez saying "Merci Thomas!"

  • Motorcycle-riding graphic designer Christophe Foultier loved rock music, and peppered his Facebook page with photos from shows and posts about bands. Some posts enthuse about Eagles of Death Metal, the last band he would ever see. Mr Foultier, 39, was killed at the Bataclan.

Foultier worked at health care communications agency Havas Life, which mourned him on its Facebook page. He and his wife, Caroline Jolivet, were raising their two small children in suburban Courbevoie.

Mr Foultier was alsoworking on an album of his own with a friend, according to an essay by Francois Sionneau, the editor-in-chief of the news weekly Le Nouvel Observateur's website and a colleague of Ms Jolivet's.

The last time he saw Mr Foultier, the designer was picking up his wife at work on his Harley-Davidson motorcycle, with a luminous smile, "the kind that make you believe in man", Mr Sionneau wrote. He admired the bike, and Mr Foultier knew it.

"He'd promised me we'd take a big trip together," Mr Sionneau wrote. Now, "it's his smile and his thirst for life that will remain".

  • Olivier Vernadal, 44, of Paris, lived near the Bataclan concert hall, and went there regularly for shows. He died there in the terrorist attack during a rock concert.

Mr Vernadal worked as a tax collector, but his first love was football.

A native of Ceyrat in central France, he played football there and coached the local team, according to the website of the newspaper Liberation.

A banner was put up at city hall saying "We are all Olivier". The town's football stadium, where Mr Vernadal used to play, will now be renamed after him, according to the France Televisions website.

  • Tributes poured in for Estelle Rouat, 25, who died during the attack at the Bataclan concert hall.

She had recently begun her first regular teaching job and a ceremony was held in her honor at the Gay Lussac middle school where she taught in Colombes, a Paris suburb. Students, parents and teachers were leaving flowers in her memory at the school's entry, the website of Le Parisien newspaper reported.

Teachers were encouraged to talk to their students about the loss, and counselling was provided. Ms Rouat, a native of Concarneau on France's Atlantic coast, was hired to teach English. Academic director Philippe Wuillamier was quoted on the Liberation newspaper's website as saying: "This young woman was passionate about her new profession."

A website for parents also announced her death, saying: "It's with shock and pain that we learn of the brutal loss."

  • Pierre-Antoine Henry, 36, who died during the attack at the Bataclan, was a communications systems engineer from a politically active family. His father, Eric Henry, has worked with a member of France's National Assembly, Serge Bardy, who said on his blog he was "deeply affected" by the family's loss.

Pierre-Antoine Henry had earned a degree in 2002 from Paris' L'Ecole de L'Innovation Technologique, the engineering and technology school said on its website.

He and his wife had two small daughters, according to Le Courrier de l'Ouest, a newspaper in western France. A cousin, Amandine Panhard, said the two "were young professionals, doing well in life".

"They killed the nicest guy in the world," she told the news service.

  • Veronique Geoffroy de Bourgies, 54, was out to dinner with friends who were visiting from out of town when attackers began shooting at La Belle Equipe, a restaurant near her home that she and her husband had recently discovered.

Her husband, photographer Stephane de Bourgies, who was in China for work when the attack happened, had lost his parents in an accident three decades ago, and he and his wife had spoken to their children about death. They talked about the importance of letting people know you love them because that love can carry you through when something terrible happens.

The pair had adopted their daughter Melissa, 14, and their son, 12, both from Madagascar. Shortly after Melissa's adoption they decided to do something to help other children from that country off the coast of south-east Africa. They founded Zazakely Sambatry, a humanitarian organisation whose name means "happy children" in the Malagasy language, according to the organisation's website.

"She was the one who did everything. I supported her in this project, but she was really the one who threw herself into it," Mr de Bourgies told French television station TF1, adding that it was important to his wife to help the children learn and grow up able to support themselves so they would stay and help improve the country.

As soon as he got the call that his wife had been killed, Mr de Bourgies began the trip home to be with the couple's children, who were being cared for by the friends who had been with his wife when she died.

"They were doing surprisingly well, almost better than me," Mr de Bourgies said in the interview with TF1. "I fell apart and it was them who made me feel better."

Veronique Geoffroy de Bourgies was very funny and had a tremendous energy and strong personality, her husband said.

"If she didn't like something, she didn't hesitate to say it," he told the television station. "But that was a fault that often became a positive trait."

The couple lived relatively close to the scene of the Charlie Hebdo attack earlier this year, so terrorism was not a foreign notion to them.

"We had talked about it like everyone talks about it," he said. "We know it happens, but we didn't imagine it would happen to us."

  • Chloe Boissinot, 25, had stopped in at a Paris restaurant with her boyfriend when the terrorists attacked. He survived; she did not.

Ms Boissinot came to Paris two years ago to be with him and began working in a pub, according to the "7 in Poitiers" news website. Friends and family poured out their grief on social media.

"Chloe was full of life and health. I want everyone to remember her that way," her sister Jenny posted on Facebook. Her mother, Babette, wrote parting thoughts to her departed daughter: "You will stay my little one always. You won't grow old. You won't get cancer."

Others were angry and defiant. One family friend wrote to the attackers: "Terrorist, does my freedom of thought bother you? I'm a woman, French, I wear a skirt, put on high heels, drink wine. Look at me: I think, speak, spit my hatred in your eye. I am diversity. I am tolerance. Look at me: you won't make me tremble."

At Chateau-Larcher in western France, where Ms Boissinot went to school, residents observed a moment of silence. Writing in a guestbook, according to the news website Francebleu, one friend called Ms Boissinot "a beautiful flower ripped from the ground by terrorism".

  • It was a night out for Claire Scesa Camax, a chance to indulge her love of music by seeing Eagles Of Death Metal at the Bataclan.

When the terrorists struck, the graphic designer and mother of two was killed. Her husband, Laurent Camax, survived.

Claire Camax, who was in her mid-thirties, loved the arts, from drawing and painting to comics and rock music, her husband told Le Courrier des Yvelines, a newspaper in the Paris suburbs.

"She was extremely energetic, joyous, warm," a multi-talented person and dedicated friend, he told the newspaper.

A graphic-arts school graduate, she started her own design business several years ago, creating websites, logos, ads and more in a clean, sometimes whimsical style. Her clients included Paris's famed Crazy Horse cabaret, which tweeted its "infinite sadness" about her death.

She and her husband were raising their children, three and seven, in Houilles, a Paris suburb. They were, he told Le Courrier des Yvelines, leading "a peaceful, middle-class French life".

  • Romain Dunet's interest in teaching had taken him around the world. The 28-year-old was an English teacher at a Paris high school when he was killed at the Bataclan, but he had done a stint helping instruct New Zealand students in French in 2013.

He pursued another passion, music, at open-mic nights in Paris bars and cafes, where he was known as Romain Dunay. Mixing covers and his own material, "he was a natural with creating vocal harmonies, and the effect was always stirring", a friend from that scene, Riyad Sanford, said. A video that friends put together features him playing up-tempo, acoustic pop-rock on guitar and singing about living in a virtual world.

Fellow musicians enjoyed his easygoing, fun-loving attitude as well as his music, Mr Sanford said.

"He had a fabulous sense of humour," he said. "Extremely approachable, he made many friends very quickly."

During his time in Dunedin, New Zealand, Mr Dunet "formed an incredibly positive relationship" with students, Judith Forbes, the principal of one of the several schools where he was an assistant teacher, told the Otago Daily Times.

A former student, Sashika Hendry, agreed.

"He just really wanted to help everyone," she told the newspaper, "and make French fun as well."

  • Nathalie Jardin, 31, was the lighting designer for the Bataclan hall rock concert targeted by terrorists. She died doing a job to which she was devoted and for which she was known for her dedication and passion.

Nicknamed Natalight, Ms Jardin was originally from the town of Marcq-en-Baroeul in northern France. She came to Paris to work for a succession of bands.

One of them, Les Fatals Picards, wrote an intimate tribute to her on its Facebook site, remembering her love of music and surfing, talent for preparing the punch bowl before concerts, ability to down an entire salad bowl of cut vegetables, and disapproval when they decided to change the set list at the last moment. A friend added that she liked good French fries. Another friend commented on the live entertainment website ampthemag.com: "Wherever you are, I know you'll make them dance again."

  • Maud Serrault, 37, of Paris, had just begun married life when she died in the attack on the Bataclan concert hall. Days later, her Facebook site still showed her strolling down a wooded path at a hotel in Germany with her groom in a tuxedo for their June wedding.

She wore a rainbow-coloured tiara and clutched a bouquet. In the other hand, she was holding the train of her wedding gown, covered casually by a denim jacket. Ms Serrault and her husband were together at the concert at the time of the attack, but he managed to flee, according to the hotel trade website Hospitality ON. Ms Serrault was director of marketing and e-commerce for Best Western France.

A native of Paris, she studied marketing and communications at CELSA Paris-Sorbonne.

  • Artist Alban Denuit, 32, born in Marmande, France, was attending the concert at the Bataclan.

He taught and showed his work in the city of Bordeaux, according to the Sud Ouest news site. The Eponyme Gallery in Bordeaux, which promoted Mr Denuit's work, issued a statement speaking of its "deep sadness" over the death of the emerging young artist.

  • Gregory Fosse, 28, of Paris, who worked for the D17 television station as a music programmer, died at the Bataclan concert hall doing what he loved best: listening to music. Terry Jee, of Paris, a singer and friend, said Mr Fosse embraced music of many styles. He had given considerable play time to Jee's song, Peace And Love, which is a call for goodwill and tolerance, and that is how the two men became friends.

"He wanted people to hear this message of peace," Jee said. "He wore his heart on his sleeve and was always ready to help others." Fighting through tears, Jee added: "Now I see that life is unfair."

Mr Fosse had worked in recent years for the TV station in Boulogne, on the outskirts of Paris. The station put out a statement saying: "We all knew his kindness, his special smile, and his passion for music," according to the Liberation newspaper. Mayor Regis Bizeau in Gambais, where Mr Fosse grew up, said the community was "deeply shaken", according to the "toutes les nouvelles" news website.

Jee said he has now dedicated Peace And Love - called "Vive la Paix" in its French version - to his friend.

  • Among audience members at the Bataclan, Anne and Pierre-Yves Guyomard were particularly steeped in music. He was a well-known sound engineer who taught his craft at a technical institute, and she was a former student.

"He was a kind human, super-competent, extremely funny and fun-loving," singer Leslie Winer said. "Peerless" in both the studio and live settings, Pierre-Yves Guyomard, 43, worked with artists including Winer and the French rock band Tanger, said guitarist Christophe Van Huffel, a former Tanger member and a collaborator of Winer's.

Anne Cornet Guyomard, 29, had been one of her husband's students before changing careers to paediatric nursing, Van Huffel said. She worked at a child care centre near Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the Paris suburb where they lived and were married in May 2013 by mayor Emmanuel Lamy, according to the French newspaper Le Parisien. He recalled a couple "full of life and hope".

The two had lived for a time on the Indian Ocean island of Reunion, where Anne Guyomard's relatives told news outlet L'Info they had spent an agonising day-and-a-half wondering about the couple's fate, calling unanswered phones, and appealing for word of the two via Facebook before being told they had been killed.

Anne was "the daughter I would wish on all parents - one who's attentive, one who's full of life", and she loved children and people in general, brother-in-law Chris Hamer told L'Info.

The last time Winer spoke to Pierre-Yves Guyomard, she said, "he told me they were hoping to have children sometime soon".

  • Romain Didier and Lamia Mondeguer were celebrating a friend's birthday at the La Belle Equipe bar when terrorists killed them and 17 others there.

Mr Didier and Ms Mondeguer had been dating for just four months, since her 30th birthday party in July, said her employer, talent agent Mathilde Mayet.

Fun-loving, assertive, lively, funny and very frank, "she really incarnated youth today", Ms Mayet said.

Ms Mondeguer was in charge of Noma Talents' work with actors and had worked at the agency for five years, Ms Mayet said. A graduate of l'Ecole superieure d'etudes cinematographiques, a Paris film school, Ms Mondeguer was passionate about culture and cinema. She had made a film that interviewed visitors at an environmentally themed 2009 exhibit that aimed to get at the similarities and differences of people around the world, the Goodplanet foundation wrote on its website.

Mr Didier, 32, had come to Paris from the wine-making community of Sancerre, where residents and the mayor gathered on Monday for a moment of silence in his honour, according to local news outlet Le Berry Republicain. In the capital, he studied drama and managed the Little Temple Bar for several years with a big smile, "great energy, great kindness, great jokes, great joy and a warm welcome", according to a tribute on the bar's Facebook page.

Some of his free time was spent playing with Crocodiles Rugby, and the team said his "joie de vivre was unequalled" in a post on its Facebook page.

"You knew what the words 'courage' and 'unity' meant," the team wrote.

  • Manuel Colaco Dias, a 63-year-old Portuguese man who had lived in France for more than 40 years, was the only person who was killed near the Stade de France, where three attackers blew themselves up outside the stadium. Mr Dias was a driver with the French company Regnault Autocars, according to the French newspaper Le Parisien.

His daughter, Sophie Colaco Dias, said that he travelled from his home town Reims, about 150 kilometres (90 miles) away from Paris, with three clients attending the game.

"After dropping them off, he gave a call to my mother and told her he preferred to stay outside instead of buying a ticket for the match so he could speak with her on the phone," she recalled. "But my mum was already speaking with me on another line. She told my father that she would call him back. After that, she constantly reached his voicemail."

  • Franck Pitiot was a bit of a Renaissance man. He worked as an engineer who oversaw construction projects; he was an enthusiast of in-line skating and juggling, motorbiking and running; and he enjoyed music, listening to the Eagles of Death Metal when terrorists attacked the Bataclan concert hall.

He died at 33, said an employee of MCCF, a branch of the VINCI construction group. He had earned his civil engineering degree at Ecole Centrale Paris, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Mr Pitiot finished university studies in 2006 at ESSTIN in Nancy in north-eastern France. The school remembered him on Twitter, saying: "L'ESSTIN-Nancy is in mourning."

The last item on a list of interests on his LinkedIn profile: humanitarianism.

  • Antoine Mary grew up in the town of Caen in north-western France, but was drawn to Paris, where the 34-year-old had worked for the past two years as an IT developer for Milky, an advertising agency in the French capital.

Mr Mary had just resigned to pursue a freelance career and had launched a website to drum up business. He was in the crowd at the Bataclan theatre, celebrating with a close friend, Germain Ferey, 36.

They died there together.

His former employer tweeted: "Today we mourn one of our own. Your free spirit, your lovely sense of humour - Antoine, we'll never forget you. RIP."

On social media, Mr Mary shared his passion for music, especially rock and techno. Many in his home town said they were grief-stricken. "So much sorrow for this magnificent young man," said Anne-Marie Lechat.

  • Isabelle Merlin, 44, was fiercely devoted to her family - so they knew something was wrong when she did not respond to their texts and voicemails.

An engineer and project leader for Continental Automotive in Rambouillet, about an hour and a half's drive south west of Paris, Ms Merlin was single. Friends and relatives recalled her as full of life and fun.

"Hyper dynamic," one called her.

Music was her passion - she took a singing course in Paris - and it was what drew her to the Bataclan theatre. Ms Merlin had just bought an apartment in Paris's desirable Montparnasse neighbourhood, and her family had gathered three weeks ago on November 1, the All Saints Day holiday, to celebrate with her.

Ms Merlin's music teacher, Morgan Dress, organised a rock concert in her memory at a pub in central Paris a week after the November 13 attacks.

"She had such a sunny personality," he told the newspaper Le Parisien.

  • Vincent Detoc, an architect who lived in suburban Paris with his wife and two young children, died at the Bataclan concert hall. It was not until the next day that the terrible news reached his family.

Monika, his wife, described the ordeal to Le Parisien newspaper of the family being summoned by authorities to a meeting.

"From that moment, I knew," she said. "I understood that we were not asked to come to get good news."

She waited as authorities took relatives into a room one by one.

"Every two minutes, we heard people screaming," she said. "When it was our turn, we were brought around a large table. A magistrate told us, 'We inform you that Mr Vincent Detoc succumbed to the terrorist attack'. Nothing else."

Vincent Jeanbrun, the mayor of Detoc's home town of L'Hay-les-Roses, expressed his condolences on his Facebook page, saying Mr Detoc was "unjustly felled under the bullets of barbarism".

  • Cecile Misse felt right at home - "good in her skin" as the French expression goes - at a place like the Bataclan.

The 32-year-old was in charge of production at the Jean-Vilar Theater in Suresnes, a town on the outskirts of Paris on the other side of the Seine. Friends and colleagues said she had been mesmerised by music and the performing arts since she was six, and working in that world was a dream come true.

She died there with a musician companion, Luis Felipe Zschoche Valle.

"For us, she'll always be a magnificent example of devotion, engagement, enthusiasm and professionalism," her theatre said.

"The accounts of those who worked with her are eloquent: always smiling and available, always positive and generous - truly a bright personality," it said.

  • Precilia Correia, 35, of Paris, was remembered by her younger sister Tatiana as someone with many creative passions: music, languages, cooking, crafts and snowboarding.

"She loved rock and frequently went to concerts," her sister said. "She was always smiling, had many friends, and loved to go out."

She was out on the night gunmen stormed the Bataclan concert hall, killing 89 people.

"She loved to travel, discover new cultures and learn languages," Tatiana said. Evidence of that are the many photos posted by Ms Correia on her Facebook page of beaches, open seas, bridges and sunsets in Europe and abroad. Her favourite quote was "Truth hurts, but silence kills".

In addition to French and Portuguese, Ms Correia also spoke Spanish and English.

She was born in suburban Paris and was a dual French-Portuguese citizen. She adored Portugal and visited her many friends in Lisbon often.

According to her LinkedIn profile, she was an employee of French retailer FNAC.

  • Christophe Mutez worked for PROS France, and the software company remembered him for his "boundless energy, expertise and professionalism".

"His infectious laughter, smile and love of life have forever enriched our lives," the company said in an online tribute. "Christophe's passing is heartbreaking, and he will be deeply missed."

Mr Mutez, 40, was killed at the Bataclan theatre. He grew up in the small Loire Valley village of Trainou, whose inhabitants "are all in a state of shock", the L'Echo Republicain newspaper said.

"Christophe was a kind and generous man who will be greatly missed by all who knew him," a friend, Sandra Curry, posted on an online condolences site.

  • Armelle Pumir Anticevic and her husband Joseph had reason to celebrate.

He had just landed an important contract at work. So the Paris couple decided to have a little fun at the rock concert at Bataclan hall, where she died the attack. He survived.

She was the 46-year-old mother of two and also worked in a design firm. Her husband was quoted by the website of Liberation newspaper as recounting the events of that night with horror, anguish and regret.

He said he and his wife at first thought they were hearing fireworks as part of the show but then realised something was wrong. At first, they dropped to the ground but his wife finally yelled: "Let's run for it!"

They were near the door, but she fell, perhaps tripping over a body. He picked her up in his arms, but as they reached the door, a police officer pulled on his arm, and he lost hold of his wife.

"In front of the door," he was quoted as saying, "there was a body on the right, another on the left. Farther away, police officers shouted at me to back up. I shouldn't have listened to them. I could have gone back in to look for Armelle. Maybe. I don't know."

His wife is remembered widely for her smile and vivacity. She began working for the firm Logic Design in the Paris suburb of Boulogne nine years ago. The firm remembered their production manager as strong and full of life.

The statement on their website ended defiantly, saying: "We will keep living, working, and we won't give in to adversity."

The family had long kept a vacation home in the mountains of southern France. A friend there was quoted on the news website of L'Independent as saying: "Armelle was quite down-to-earth and loved life."

This story will be updated

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