Belfast Telegraph

Tuesday 22 July 2014

Philip Seymour Hoffman dies aged 46: Capote and Boogie Nights actor found dead

Philip Seymour Hoffman has been found dead at his New York apartment
Philip Seymour Hoffman has been found dead at his New York apartment

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman has been found dead at his New York apartment after suffering "an apparent drug overdose".

According to the Wall Street Journal, the actor - best known for his Oscar-winning performance as Truman Capote - was found dead at his Manhattan apartment on Sunday afternoon.

A film and stage actor, as well as theater director, Hoffman was born in New York in 1967.

Among his list of award-winning and critically acclaimed performances, he starred in The Big Lebowski (1998), Almost Famous (2000) and Doubt (2008).

Last year the actor received professional help for drug and alcohol addiction, after being sober for over 20 years.

On Sunday, the Wall Street Journal confirmed the actor had been found dead at his apartment, according to an official from the New York Police Department.

He was found dead in the bathroom at around 11am on Sunday, according to officials.

Philip Seymour Hoffman had checked into rehab in May for heroin use.

On Sunday a spokesman for the NYPD confirmed "police were called by a friend of the actor".

"He was found dead in his bathroom of an apparent drug overdose," an NYPD spokesman said.

A spokesman for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts said it was "shocked and deeply saddened to learn that Philip Seymour Hoffman has died".

The actor recently appeared in the massively successful Hunger Games series, and had been working on the third installment - due out next year.

The actor leaves behind his long-standing partner and costume designer Mimi O'Donnell and their two daughters and son.

Clip shows Hoffman during his Oscar-winning performance in Capote

In 2012, Philip Seymour Hoffman starred in the Master - the hugely-anticipated film cult drama.

The film commanded a huge following on its opening weekend in the US, smashing records on just a handful of screens.

Alongside his Oscar-winning performance in 2005's Capote - in which he played the eccentric American author Truman Capote - the New York actor also lent towards smaller budget alternative cinema.

In 1998, he starred in the dark, controversial but highly-acclaimed, Happiness.

Aside from niche parts, Philip Seymour Hoffman also landed the role opposite Tom Cruise in the third installment of the blockbuster Mission Impossible franchise.

Hoffman played Owen Davian - an arms dealer with a penchant for chaos and violence.

Revered among his peers and critics alike, he was renowned for his wide-ranging ability as an actor - playing a huge variety of roles in his 23 year career.

Working alongside some of the Hollywood's biggest names, he appear in Spike Lee's 2002 film, 25th Hour, in which Edward Norton enjoys his last 24 hours of freedom before serving a long prison sentence for drug dealing.

Taking on the role of one of Norton's old school friends, Hoffman played teacher Jacon Elinsky - which saw the character fighting with his attraction towards a female pupil.

In 2002 he played the role of legendary rock journalist, Lester Bangs, in Cameron Crowe's semi-autobiographical Almost Famous.

TRIBUTES

Comedian Ricky Gervais wrote: "Such shocking & sad news. RIP Philip Seymour Hoffman. One of the greatest actors of a generation and a sweet, funny & humble man."

American singer and actress Lindsay Pearce posted: "Too many souls keep being lost to substance abuse. Thoughts to Philip Seymour Hoffman's loved ones and all affected by his loss. So sad."

Former England footballer Gary Lineker said: "Philip Seymour Hoffman's death is so sad. One of the World's greatest actors. Privileged to have seen him on Broadway. A terrible loss £RIP."

Actress Mia Farrow wrote: "OH NO!!!!! Philip Seymour Hoffman has died. A truly kind, wonderful man and one of our greatest actors - ever."

She added: "Rest in peace Philip Seymour Hoffman. We who marveled at each of your performances, are grateful and very very sad."

Steve Coogan said: "There are actors and there are movie stars and sometimes they're both but he was an actor first and a movie star second, although he was a movie star."

 

Further reading:

Philip Seymour Hoffman's last ever interview: 'You have to shift or change, or else you stay in the dark'

Screen stars pay tribute to Hoffman 

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