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Storm Jonas: at least 19 dead as Washington DC and New York City in snow storm

By Samuel Osborne

Published 24/01/2016

USA: A bulldozer clears snow on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol January 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Heavy snow continued to fall in the Mid-Atlantic region causing
USA: A bulldozer clears snow on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol January 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Heavy snow continued to fall in the Mid-Atlantic region causing "life-threatening blizzard conditions" and affecting millions of people. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 24: A snowplow clears snow in front of the U.S. Capitol on January 24, 2016 in Washington, DC. The blizzard that has brought massive snowfall and a standstill to the East Coast and the Mid Atlantic region has stopped. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
People walk on Pennsylvania Avenue in near whiteout conditions in Washington on January 23, 2016. A deadly blizzard walloped the eastern United States on Saturday, paralyzing Washington and New York under a heavy blanket of snow as officials warned millions of people to remain indoors until the storm eases up. / AFP / MANDEL NGANMANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
People participate in a giant snowball fights in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. AFP / Olivier DoulieryOLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images
People participate in a giant snowball fights in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. /AFP / Olivier DoulieryOLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images
A worker clears snow off the driveway of a car wash on Connecticut Avenue in Washington, DC on January 24, 2016. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down on January 24, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / MANDEL NGANMANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 23: A woman walks in strong winds and heavy snow fall in Central Park on January 23, 2016 in New York City. A major Nor'easter is hitting much of the East Coast and parts of the South as forecasts warn of up to two feet of snow in some areas. (Photo by Astrid Riecken/Getty Images)
Snow-covered cars are seen on a residential street in the northwest of Washington, DC on January 24, 2016. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / MANDEL NGANMANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
The clear up continues in New York City following yesterday's record-setting snowfall which left at least 18 people dead and brought much of the US East Coast to an icy standstill. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Ronnie Esplin/PA Wire
The Spring Street salt shed is filled with salt before an upcoming snowstorm on January 21, 2016 in New York, NY. Winter Storm Jonas was expected to hit New York City between Friday afternoon and Saturday morning and the National Weather Service recently included New York City on a blizzard watch. (Photo by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images)
Visitors to New York's Central Park pass the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016, in the wake of a storm that dumped heavy snow along the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
The New York Skyline is seen from Exchange Place on January 24, 2016 in Jersey City. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / KENA BETANCURKENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images

At least 19 people have died in the US as the historic Storm Jonas continues to wreak havoc across the east coast.

The blizzard has brought more than 2ft (60cm) of snow, causing 11 states to declare a state of emergency.

Heavy snow caused Washington DC to declare a "snow emergency", closing its transport system over the weekend, and New York City banned all road travel, cancelled bus services and shut overground parts of the subway.

In Washington, 22.2 inches of snow were recorded, with 26.8 inches recorded in New York City - just 0.1 inches short of the 2006 record.

Thirteen people were killed in weather-related car crashes, four while shoveling snow, and two died of hypothermia.

Later New York's governor Andrew Cuomo said a travel ban instituted during a massive snowstorm had been lifted.

The travel ban had  covered all state and local roads in New York City, the Long Island Expressway and Northern State Parkway and the Port Authority's Hudson River crossings.

Warm, moist air from the Atlantic Ocean collided with cold air to form the massive weather system.

According to FlightAware.com, 3,283 flights within, into or out of the United States have been cancelled today.

More than 130,000 people are without power across the south east.

There are fears the weather system causing the blizzard could head to Britain, albeit in a much milder form.

Although the low pressure system will be extremely modified by the time it reaches British shores, the Met Office has issued 9 yellow "be aware" warnings over Tuesday and Wednesday.

The warnings have been issued across parts of Scotland, Wales and Northern England.

Rain is expected to be persistent and at times heavy, leading to localised river flooding, the Met Office has warned.

Many parts of the warning areas could see between 50 and 100mm of rain, with the most exposed upland parts of north Wales, north-west England and south-West Scotland potentially seeing between 150 and 200mm.

Helen Roberts, a meteorologist at the Met Office said: “The same low pressure weather system will affect weather in the UK and remnants of that storm will travel across the Atlantic, although it will be extremely modified.

“The weather is expected to be pretty mild, although heavy rain is expected over a two-day period next week, which may also bring some sleet and snow in higher areas.”

Source: The Independent

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