Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

Home News World

Syrian general declares major ground offensive

Published 08/10/2015

Syria's conflict began as an uprising against Assad in 2011
Syria's conflict began as an uprising against Assad in 2011

Syria's chief-of-staff has declared a wide-ranging ground offensive by government forces, a day after Russian air strikes and cruise missiles launched from the Caspian Sea backed Damascus's multi-pronged advance into two Syrian provinces.

In a rare televised speech, General Ali Ayoub said the Russian strikes have facilitated an expanded military operation to eliminate "terrorists" - a term the Syrian government uses to refer to all armed opposition to President Bashar Assad.

The Syrian ground push got a boost after Russian warships launched the cruise missiles into Syria on Wednesday, bringing a major new military might into the war on the heels of Russian air strikes that began last week.

The cruise missiles hit the provinces of Raqqa and Aleppo in the north and also Idlib province in the north west, Russian officials said. Islamic State has strongholds in Raqqa and Aleppo, while Syria's al Qaida branch, the Nusra Front, has a strong presence in Idlib.

Moscow insists it is only striking militants but the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Russian air strikes in Idlib killed at least seven civilians on Wednesday. Previously, at least 40 civilians were killed on the first day of the Russian air strikes last week.

"After the Russian air strikes, which reduced the fighting ability of Daesh and other terrorist groups, the Arab Syrian armed forces kept the military initiative and formed armed ground troops, the most important of which is the fourth legion-raid," Gen Ayoub said, using the Arabic acronym for IS.

He added: "Today, the Syrian Arab armed forces began a wide-ranging attack with the aim of eliminating the terrorists groups and liberating the areas and towns that suffered from their scourge and crimes."

Syrian activists said government troops pushed from areas they control in the rural part of Latakia, into rebel-held areas in the province that is the heartland of Assad's family and Alawite minority group. Latakia is the third province to see ground operations since Wednesday.

The head of the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, Rami Abdurrahman, said the troops moved from the village of Jorin into other parts of rural Latakia and Sahl al-Ghab, a vital plain that lies between Latakia, Hama and Idlib provinces.

Jaish al-Fatah, or the Army of Conquest, a coalition of rebel and militant groups that includes the Nusra Front, operates in the area. Foreign fighters, particularly from Asia and China's ethnic Turkic Uighur minority, also have a strong presence in the area, according to Abdurrahman.

The observatory chief said Thursday's push was along the lines of rural Alawite villages there. The minority Alawites - an offshoot of Shiite Islam to which the Assad family belongs - make up most of the residents of the coastal Latakia and Tartous provinces.

Lebanon's Al-Manar TV, which belongs to the Shiite militant group Hezbollah and which fights alongside Assad's troops in several areas in Syria, said the Syrian army seized control of al-Bahsa village in Hama on Thursday.

Wednesday's ground offensive by the government focused on a number of towns and villages in rural Hama and north-western Idlib province, sparking intense clashes. Activist Ahmad al-Ahmad said rebels repelled government troops from at least one village.

Syria's conflict, which began as an uprising against Assad in March 2011 but descended into a full-blown civil war, has so far killed 250,000 people, according to the United Nations.

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting?

Read More

From Belfast Telegraph