Belfast Telegraph

Thursday 26 May 2016

Egypt: A revolution of unbridled joy

By Robert Fisk

Published 12/02/2011

CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 12: The danger seemingly passed, Egyptian parents take their children out to witness a historical celebration following the news of the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on February 12, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. After 18 days of widespread protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who has now left Cairo for his home in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el-Sheik, announced that he would step down. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 12: The danger seemingly passed, Egyptian parents take their children out to witness a historical celebration following the news of the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on February 12, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. After 18 days of widespread protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who has now left Cairo for his home in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el-Sheik, announced that he would step down. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 11: Egyptians celebrate in Tahrir Square after hearing the news of the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on February 11, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. After 18 days of widespread protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who has now left Cairo for his home in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el-Sheik, announced that he would step down. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 11: Fireworks explode over Tahrir Square as Egyptians celebrate the news of the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on February 11, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. After 18 days of widespread protests, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who has now left Cairo for his home in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el-Sheik, announced that he would step down. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Anti-government protester flashes V sign at Tahrir square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
Egyptians celebrate at Tahrir Square after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military.(AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
Egyptian Army soldiers celebrate with children on their armored personnel carrier, as the children's parents take photos of them with the soldiers using their mobile phones, as they celebrate the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country to the military, in front of the Egyptian museum at night in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Egyptians celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military at Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Egyptians celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military at Tahrir square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Fire works seen over Tahrir Square as Egyptians celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military.(AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
An Egyptian man celebrates the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country to the military, at night in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
An Egyptian relaxes over an ancient statue of Kasr el-Nile bridge, created by French sculptor Alfred Jacquemart, near Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military.(AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Egyptians celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military.(AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Egyptians set off fireworks as they celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military at Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Egyptian citizens wave their country's flag as they celebrate after President Hosni Mubarak resigned and handed power to the military at Tahrir square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Egypt exploded with joy, tears, and relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV. Mubarak, who until the end seemed unable to grasp the depth of resentment over his three decades of authoritarian rule, finally resigned Friday and handed power to the military. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
Egyptians toss a boy in the air as they celebrate the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, who handed control of the country to the military, at night in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Friday, Feb. 11, 2011. Fireworks burst over Tahrir Square and Egypt exploded with joy and tears of relief after pro-democracy protesters brought down President Hosni Mubarak with a momentous march on his palaces and state TV.(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate prior to the televised speech of Hosni Mubarak
Anti-government protesters hold shoes in the air as a sign of contempt as they surround the state television building following Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's televised speech, on the Corniche in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave." (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
Army soldiers stand guard as anti-government protesters surround the state television building following Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's televised speech, on the Corniche in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave." (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate prior to the televised speech of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, in which they believed he would step down, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave."(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
A protester is overcome by emotion as he and others prematurely celebrate prior to the televised speech of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, in which they believed he would step down, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave."(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate prior to the televised speech of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, in which they believed he would step down, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave." (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
A protester is overcome by emotion as he and others prematurely celebrate prior to the televised speech of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, in which they believed he would step down, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave."(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate prior to the televised speech of Hosni Mubarak
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave." (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. President Hosni Mubarak refused to step down or leave the country and instead handed his powers to his vice president Thursday, remaining president and ensuring regime control over the reform process, which stunned protesters demanding his ouster, who waved their shoes in contempt and shouted, "Leave, leave, leave." (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: A woman cries as anti-government protesters walk during a candlelight vigil for those killed during the uprising in Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: Anti-government protesters walk during a candlelight vigil for those killed during the uprising in Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: Anti-government protesters mill around an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: Anti-government protesters pray in front of an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators have been blocking the vehicles from moving out of the square, fearing attack from pro-Mubarak supporters if the army leaves. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: Thousands of anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square during sunset prayers on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: Anti-government protesters carry a banner of the Egyptian flag through Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: An anti-government protester runs under a large Egyptian flag in front of the Egyptian Parliament building Feburary 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of Egyptians protested outside of the parliament building in downtown Cairo to demand the assembly's immediate dissolution as part of a wave of anti-government protests in the nearby Tahrir Square. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: An anti-government protester shouts in front of the Egyptian Parliament building Feburary 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of Egyptians protested outside of the parliament building in downtown Cairo to demand the assembly's immediate dissolution as part of a wave of anti-government protests in the nearby Tahrir Square. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
A guide leads Egyptian riders past the Pyramids of Giza Feburary 9, 2011 in Giza, Egypt. Egyptians authorities have re-opened the pyramids to tourists despite massive anti-government protests
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: An anti-government protester attachs a sign to the gate of the Egyptian Parliament building while an Egyptian Army soldier watches from inside Feburary 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of Egyptians protested outside of the parliament building in downtown Cairo to demand the assembly's immediate dissolution as part of a wave of anti-government protests in the nearby Tahrir Square. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
An Egyptian protester takes pictures on his mobile phone of a Christmas tree with photographs of some of those who died during the recent events attached to it, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won't be tolerated much longer. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: Anti-government protesters demonstrate near the Egyptian Parliament building on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of Egyptians protested outside of the parliament building in downtown Cairo to demand the assembly's immediate dissolution following waves of anti-government protests in the nearby Tahrir Square. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
An Egyptian protester sits by a Christmas tree with photographs of some of those who died during the recent events attached to it, at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won't be tolerated much longer. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Protesters stamp on a poster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: A family walks with fellow anti-government protesters during a candlelight vigil for those killed during the uprising in Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 09: An anti-government protester weeps during a candlelight vigil for those killed during the uprising in Tahrir Square on February 9, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. More than two weeks into Egypt's uprising, demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters move through Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Thousands of anti-government protesters pack Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pass Egyptian army soldiers while entering Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pass Egyptian army soldiers while entering Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pass Egyptian army soldiers while entering Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters watch a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters watch a massive rally near sunset in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: A man holds a child on his shoulders during an anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another noisy mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters cheer in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim prepares to address anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. He was released yesterday after nearly two weeks in the custody of Egyptian secuirty forces. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters cheer in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pray in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pray in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pray in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Anti-government protesters cheer in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: An anti-government protester sleeps outside a closed travel agency in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Thousands of anti-government protesters pack Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Thousands of anti-government protesters pack Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters chant during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters chant during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters chant during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim (2L) greets thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by police yesterday after nearly two weeks in custody. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim greets thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by police yesterday after nearly two weeks in custody. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: A man holds a child on his shoulders during an anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another noisy mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim, weakened after nearly two weeks in custody, is helped off the stage after greeting thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by Egyptian security forces yesterday evening. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim, weakened after nearly two weeks in custody, is helped off the stage after greeting thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by Egyptian security forces yesterday evening. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim (C) gazes upon thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. He was released yesterday after almost two weeks in the custody of Egyptian secuirty forces. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: A man holds a child on his shoulders during an anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another noisy mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim prepares to address anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. He was released yesterday after almost two weeks in the custody of Egyptian secuirty forces. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters watch a massive rally near sunset in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim, weakened after nearly two weeks in custody, is helped off the stage after greeting thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by Egyptian security forces yesterday evening. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters hold an huge Egyptian flag as they take part in a demonstration at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, center, the 30-year-old Google Inc. marketing manager who was a key organizer of the online campaign that sparked the first protest on Jan. 25, talks to the crowd in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. A young leader of Egypt's anti-government protesters, newly released from detention, joined a massive crowd of hundreds of thousands in Cairo's Tahrir Square for the first time Tuesday, greeted by cheers, whistling and thunderous applause when he declared: "We will not abandon our demand and that is the departure of the regime." (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. The arabic on the sign reads "The rage brings the light of freedom". (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Egyptian Muslim clerics file through the crowd in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, a Google Inc. marketing manager, who has become a hero of the demonstrators since he went missing on Jan. 27, two days after the protests began, hugs the mother of Khaled Said, a young 28-year-old businessman who died in June, 2010, at the hands of undercover police, setting off months of protests against the hated police, at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb.8, 2011. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
An Egyptian married couple are surrounded by anti-Mubarak protesters at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Thousands of anti-Mubarak protesters are seen next to an Egyptian army tank as they take part in a demonstration at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Anti-government protesters hold an Egyptian flag during demonstrations in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters shout slogans as they march in Alexandria, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb.8, 2011. Tens of thousands of Egyptians have been demonstrating in Cairo and other cities, calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. Arabic sign read ' Freedom is hard to get'. , ' get out'. (AP Photo/Tarek Fawzy)
Thousands of Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters take part in a demonstration in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrator prays in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrator shows the victory sign as others shoot video on their celular phones in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators chant slogans for freedom in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrator shows the victory sign in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: A man and woman stand arm in arm in Tahrir Square, watching a protest speaker February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continues February 7, with protests continuing unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: A boy stands among waving Egyptian flags in Tahrir Square February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continues February 7, with protests continuing unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: A mother carries her newborn through Tahrir Square while looking at photographs of Egyptians killed during the uprising on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the protests began, thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
UNDATED - In this undated photo provided by Google, company executive Wael Ghonim is shown. Ghonim, who disappeared amid the chaos of massive protests that have shaken Egypt for two weeks, was released from government custody February 7, 2011. (Photo by Google via Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: His face painted in the national colors, anti-government protester Mamoud Tariq, 13, attends a demonstration in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the protests began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A public worker reacts behind razor wire as Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters, unseen, block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters react as others, unseen, block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters sit next to armored Army vehicles in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
People carry a symbolic coffin of Egyptian journalist Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, in symbolic funeral ceremony in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The reporter who was shot during clashes a week ago died of his wounds Friday, his employer said, in the first reported death of a journalist in the chaos surrounding Egypt's anti-government protests. Mahmoud worked for Al-Taawun, a newspaper put out by the Al-Ahram publishing house and lived near central Tahrir Square, the focal point of protest rallies as well as clashes this week between large crowds of supporters and opponents of President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Anti-government demonstrators gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators pray in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators pray in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
Anti-government demonstrators pray in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators rest in front an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The protesters want the army to stay in the square, as protection against government supporters. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrators shoots video on his celular phone in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators gather near an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters walk past an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including families, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters react as others, unseen, block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Thousands of anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
People carry a symbolic coffin of Egyptian journalist Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, in symbolic funeral ceremony in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The reporter who was shot during clashes a week ago died of his wounds Friday, his employer said, in the first reported death of a journalist in the chaos surrounding Egypt's anti-government protests. Mahmoud worked for Al-Taawun, a newspaper put out by the Al-Ahram publishing house and lived near central Tahrir Square, the focal point of protest rallies as well as clashes this week between large crowds of supporters and opponents of President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Public workers are seen behind razor wire as Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters, unseen, block the street to cut their access to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Thousands of anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
Soldiers in a tank control traffic near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An anti-government protester wears a mouth gag reading "30 years, enough" in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
An effigy depicting Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak hangs while protesters wave Egyptian flags at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Anti-government protesters, one showing a poster depicting Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak as Hitler, camp in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, a Google Inc. marketing manager, talks at his home in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb.7, 2011. A Google manager held in Egypt for about 10 days over anti-government protests was freed Monday. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
Egyptian army soldiers and tanks are positioned in front of anti-government demonstrators, using barricades to prevent pro-government protesters, not seen, from approaching them, in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Two boys with with their faces painted in patriotic Egyptian colors as part of the anti-government movement talk in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many families, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government demonstrators clean up trash in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
Green balloons reading: "Yes to life" are held by pro-life movement activists during Pope Benedict XVI's Angelus prayer in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. The Pontiff says he is praying that Egypt can find tranquillity and peaceful coexistence. Benedict said he is attentively following the "delicate situation in the dear Egyptian nation,'' addressing thousands of pilgrims Sunday in St. Peter's. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An anti-government protester reads a Koran while leaning against makeshift barriers protecting the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An anti-government protester leans against makeshift barriers protecting the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An Egyptian Army soldier in riot gear stands watch in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Egyptian women in the anti-government movement march against president Hosni Mubarak in central Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: A wounded anti-government protester sits behind razor wire guarding the edge of the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Egyptian women in the anti-government movement march against president Hosni Mubarak in central Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An anti-government protester stands with an Egyptian flag behind razor wire guarding the edge of the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters who spent the night manning makeshift barriers protecting the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square eat breakfast the morning of February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Egyptian soldiers in riot gear pull away a pro-Mubarak loyalist away from nearby anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continues unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An Egyptian army soldier watches as anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many families, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women and children, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women and children, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters sit and lie inside the tracks of an Egyptian Army tank to prevent it from moving and to shield themselves from the rain, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator reads the news about the protests in a newspaper, as he stands in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator holds a baby, wearing a hat bearing the words "Leave", as thousands gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
A young girl cries after being perched on top of an Egyptian Army tank by a relative, left, in order for him to take a photo of her on his mobile phone, as other anti-government protesters sit down in front of the tanks to prevent them from moving, at the protest site opposite the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's vice president met a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began, though Al-Jazeera's English-language news network said one of its correspondents had been detained the same day by the Egyptian military. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators chant slogans as they gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's vice president met a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began, though Al-Jazeera's English-language news network said one of its correspondents had been detained the same day by the Egyptian military. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
A young Egyptian anti-government protester wearing face paint in the colors of the Egyptian flag is seen at the protest site opposite the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's vice president met a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began, though Al-Jazeera's English-language news network said one of its correspondents had been detained the same day by the Egyptian military. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator takes some rest in front of a barricade protecting the group from possible attacks by pro-government protesters in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator takes some rest in front of a barricade protecting the group from possible attacks by pro-government protesters in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator waves national flags as thousands gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak slogans designed by stone are written by protesters at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian anti-Mubarak protester chants anti-Mubarak slogans at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian anti-government protester puts a tape on his mouth with the word "Shut up" written in Arabic as he sits in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. State TV says the top leadership body of Egypt's ruling party, including the president's son Gamal Mubarak and the party secretary-general Safwat el-Sharif, resigned Saturday in a new gesture apparently aimed at convincing anti-government protesters that the regime is serious about reform. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters celebrate during a symbolic funeral for President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. Arabic reads " No condolences", Condolences in Tel Aviv" and " killer failure. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs in a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters celebrate during a symbolic funeral for President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. Arabic read " No condolences", " get out". (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: A woman protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: A girl sits with signs sits during a protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government demonstrators rest while blocking an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Egyptian army soldiers and tanks are positioned in front of anti-government demonstrators, to prevent clashes between Mubarak supporters, unseen, and anti-government protesters who shelter behind makeshift barricades, in Tahrir square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. Rallies in Cairo and behind-the-scenes diplomacy from the U.S. President Barack Obama administration is piling more pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to make a swift exit and allow a temporary government to embark on an immediate path toward democracy. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs in a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government protesters sweep up in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A suspected Egyptian policeman is led through a crowd after being captured in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An injured anti-government protester sleeps in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs at a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government protesters demand the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continue to occupy the square, calling for the end of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs at a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
A family of anti-government protestors sits in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. Rallies in Cairo and behind-the-scenes diplomacy from the Obama administration is piling more pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to make a swift exit and allow a temporary government to embark on an immediate path toward democracy. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
A wounded anti-government protestor uses his cellular phone in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. Rallies in Cairo and behind-the-scenes diplomacy from the Obama administration is piling more pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to make a swift exit and allow a temporary government to embark on an immediate path toward democracy. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
A girl waves her national flag as anti-government protestors gather in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011
Egyptian army soldiers catch a plain clothes state security policeman, center, after he was discovered by anti-Mubarak protesters in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. US President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Egyptian army soldiers catch a plain clothes state security policeman, center, after he was discovered by anti-Mubarak protesters in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian anti-Mubarak protester flashes the V sign in front of a tank in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Egyptian army soldiers remove debris from a destroyed vehicle as they plan to tow it away in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The army planned to tow away the vehicles, which demonstrators had been using as barracades against supporters of President Hosni Mubarak. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: Anti-government protesters march in Tahrir Square February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square quieted February 4, as anti-government protesters called for a "Day of Depature" and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: A anti-government protester stands in Tahrir Square February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square quieted February 4, as anti-government protesters called for a "Day of Depature" and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: Egyptian anti-government protesters stare down nearby pro-government protesters in Talaat Harb Square the afternoon of February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's city center diminished February 4, called "The day of departure" by anti-government protesters, as they claimed more of the city center and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: An exhausted anti-government youth sleeps on a curb on the edge of Tahrir Square February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square quieted February 4, as anti-government protesters called for a "Day of Depature" and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Egyptian soldiers stand behind a barbed wire barrier, as protesters walk past during anti-Mubarak protest in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. The Egyptian military guarded thousands of protesters pouring into Cairo's main square on Friday in an attempt to drive out President Hosni Mubarak after a week and half of pro-democracy demonstrations. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
A wounded anti-government protester is carried after brief stone-throwing clashes with pro-government supporters in Talaat Harb square near Tahrir square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street battles. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
An anti-government protester sleeps on the ground in Tahrir, or Liberation Square, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. The Arabic on the sash reads "Popular Protection Committee". (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government demonstrators pray while blocking an Egyptian army vehicle in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: An unidentified man protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. According to published reports, about 500 people gathered behind police barricades calling for the long-time Egyptian leader's ouster. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: An unidentified woman protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. According to published reports, about 500 people gathered behind police barricades calling for the long-time Egyptian leader's ouster. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: A man protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: An unidentified man protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. According to published reports, about 500 people gathered behind police barricades calling for the long-time Egyptian leader's ouster. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: A woman holds up a picture of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak during a protest in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: American Stacy Mazzara was one of hundreds of people protesting against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Anti-government protestors dance in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: Anti-government demonstrators chant in Tahrir Square on February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government protesters have called today 'The day of departure'. Thousands have again gathered in Tahrir Square calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
An anti-government protester sleeps in Tahrir, or Liberation Square, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
An anti-government protester, wounded by stones hurled by pro-government protesters, is carried by a colleague, near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street fights. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Anti-government protestors, look on behind makeshift barricades, in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street fights. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An anti-government protestor holds a poster in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street fights. The U.S. was pressing Egypt for an immediate start to democratic transition, including a proposal for Mubarak to step down immediately. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A woman protesting against the Egyptian government uses a burned out car to make a phone call February 3, 2011 in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. The stand off between anti- and pro-President Hosni Mubarak factions in Egypt's central square continuted February 3, after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A wounded anti-government protester is carried off after being struck by a rock during clashes with pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester throws rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 03: Passengers arrive at Gatwick Airport's South Terminal on a Foreign Office-chartered flight from Cairo, Egypt on February 3, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Oli Scarff-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Anti-Mubarak protesters (bottom) clash with pro-Mubarak supporters in Tarhir Square, Cairo, Egypt, as the violence continues. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday February 3, 2011. At least eight people have been killed and hundreds injured in clashes in and around the Square, where pro-government attackers opened fire on protesters early this morning. See PA story POLITICS Egypt. Photo credit should read: Lewis Whyld/PA Wire
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An army tank keeps Supporters of President Mubarak (top) separate from anti-government protestors in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters taunt and throw rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester throws rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters carry rocks to throw at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A wounded anti-government protester is carried off after being struck by a rock during clashes with pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester taunts while throwing rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator is treated for a head wound after being hit by a rock in clashes on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator is treated for a head wound after being hit by a stone in clashes on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator holds a sign during clashes on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Initial protests against the government were organized on internet social media. The Egyptian army positioned tanks between the protesters during a second day of violent skirmishes in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw rocks at pro-government supporters as they try to protect themselves from incoming stones near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester is carried off after being wounded during clashes with pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester exhorts fellow demonstrators to make space for Egyptian army soldiers on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Egyptian men protest against the government of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek during a march in central Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarek factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A captured Egyptian man that anti-government protesters allege is a member of the Egyptian government security forces screams as his handcuffed are adjusted in an ad hoc anti-government command center February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government Egyptian leaders questioned the man and several other suspected security officers, who were captured near Tahrir Square, allegedly trying to blend in with anti-government protesters. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarak factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A protesting Egyptian man, who was struck in the face with a rock during recent clashes with supporters of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek, stands in central Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarek factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A captured Egyptian man suspected of being in the government security forces is roughly handled by anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government Egyptian leaders have captured dozens of Egyptians they allege are government police or intelligence officers, trying to blend in with anti-government protesters. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarek factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protestors rest in a truck after clashes with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protestor holds a blooded Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protestors wave Egyptian flags in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An injured anti-government protestor rests amongst rocks in Tahrir Square after clashes with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A man looks down from the window of a derelict house as anti-government protestors man barricades in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protestor holds a rock as he looks down on supporters of President Mubarak from the roof of a derelict house in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protestors look down from the roof of a derelict house in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
An Egyptian pro government protester shouts as he is held back by Army soldiers in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up again and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters. The two sides are trading volleys of stone-throwing, but government backers are falling back and protesters are swarming onto a highway overpass from which their rivals had pelted them with stones and firebombs overnight. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Anti-government protestors throw stones during clashes in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Another bout of heavy gunfire and clashes erupted Thursday around dusk in the Cairo square at the center of Egypt's anti-government chaos, while new looting and arson spread around the capital. Gangs of thugs supporting President Hosni Mubarak attacked reporters, foreigners, and human rights workers and the army rounded up foreign journalists. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
A wounded anti-government protester holds up his bloodied hand as he is carried by others back from clashes with pro-government supporters near the Egyptian Museum in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Anti-government protesters and regime supporters clashed in a second day of rock-throwing battles, while gangs of thugs supporting Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak attacked reporters, foreigners and rights workers as the army rounded up foreign journalists and new looting and arson were reported. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
An anti-government protestor displays a haircut reading "Out" in Cairo's main square, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up again and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
An anti-government protester throws rocks at pro-government supporters, while another talks on his mobile phone, right, during clashes between the two sides near the Egyptian Museum in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Protesters and regime supporters skirmished in a second day of rock-throwing battles at a central Cairo square while new lawlessness spread around the city. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
A soldier standing on a tank gestures in Cairo's Tahrir Square, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. The Egyptian military is taking up positions between anti-government demonstrators and supporters of President Hosni Mubarak. Hours after automatic gunfire hit the protest camp at Tahrir Square, soldiers carrying rifles could be seen lining up between the two sides late Thursday morning. Several hundred other soldiers were moving toward the front line. (AP Photo/Victoria Hazou)
An anti-government protester swings an Egyptian flag, while smoking a cigarette, to beckon others to reinforce those at the frontline of clashes with pro-government supporters, near the Egyptian Museum in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Protesters and regime supporters skirmished in a second day of rock-throwing battles at a central Cairo square while new lawlessness spread around the city. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters continue to occupy Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between groups opposed to President Hosni Mubarak and supporters of his 30 year rule continued into the night, as the Egyptian health minister reported that five people died in yesterday's violence. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester wears a makeshift helmet during a stone-throwing battle with supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling for a second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw stones towards supporters of President Hosni Mubarak on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling for a second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A wounded anti-government demonstrator flashes the V sign in Cairo's Tahrir Square, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. The Egyptian military is taking up positions between anti-government demonstrators and supporters of President Hosni Mubarak. Hours after automatic gunfire hit the protest camp at Tahrir Square, soldiers carrying rifles could be seen lining up between the two sides late Thursday morning. Several hundred other soldiers were moving toward the front line. (AP Photo/Victoria Hazou)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester tries to restrain comrades from lynching a captured supporter of President Hosni Mubarak on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling for a second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator prays near Egyptian army vehicles on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Anti-government protestors throw stones during clashes in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Another bout of heavy gunfire and clashes erupted Thursday around dusk in the Cairo square at the center of Egypt's anti-government chaos, while new looting and arson spread around the capital. Gangs of thugs supporting President Hosni Mubarak attacked reporters, foreigners, and human rights workers and the army rounded up foreign journalists. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
Journalist Christiane Amanpour talks to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (AP Photo/ABC News) NO SALES
Soldiers protect a suspected pro-government supporter, bottom left in red, near Cairo's main square, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters.(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Egyptians shout anti-Mubarak slogans during a march in Alexandria, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Egyptian authorities battled to save President Hosni Mubarak's regime with a series of concessions and promises to protesters, but realities on the streets of Cairo may be outrunning his capacity for change. (AP Photo/Tarek Fawzy)
Egyptian anti government protesters throw stones during clashes in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up again and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters.The two sides are trading volleys of stone-throwing, but government backers are falling back and protesters are swarming onto a highway overpass from which their rivals had pelted them with stones and firebombs overnight. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
A Egyptian pro-government protester is prevented throwing stones by soldiers in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up again and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters. The two sides are trading volleys of stone-throwing, but government backers are falling back and protesters are swarming onto a highway overpass from which their rivals had pelted them with stones and firebombs overnight. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
An anti-government protester, right, attempts to protect an injured suspected pro-government supporter, center, from other protesters near Tahrir, or Liberation square in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters.(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Protestors throw stones in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. Egypt's prime minister apologized for an attack by government supporters on protesters in a surprising show of contrition Thursday, and the government offered more concessions to try to calm the wave of demonstrations demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Egyptian anti government protesters throw stones during clashes in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up again and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
An injured Egyptian doctor treats an injured suspected pro-government supporter, near Tahrir, or Liberation square in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters.(AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protestors throw stones during clashes in Cairo, Egypt.
Supporters of embattled Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak ride horses through the melee during a clash between pro- and anti-Mubarak protesters February 2, 2011 in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 02: An anti-government protestor shows blooded hands from an injury received during clashes with supporters of President Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 2, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government protestors continue to occupy Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo after President Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office but stay in power until elections later this year. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
A supporter of embattled Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek rides a camel through the melee during a clash between pro-Mubarek and anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 2, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.
A supporter of embattled Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek is thrown from a horse during a clash between pro-Mubarek and anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 2, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.
Pro-government demonstrators, below, and anti-government demonstrators, above, clash in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011.
A demonstrator in Tahrir or Liberation Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Anti-government protestors waves their shoes, in a gesture of anger, after President Hosni Mubarak announces that he will not seek re-election on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Anti-government protestors wave their shoes, in a gesture of anger, after President Hosni Mubarak announces that he will not seek re-election on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: An anti-government protestor waves a shoe, in a gesture of anger, after President Hosni Mubarak announced that he will not seek re-election on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Anti-government protestors in Tahrir Square continue to defy the curfew as they listen to a radio as President Hosni Mubarak announces that he will not seek re-election on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Anti-government protestors continue to defy the curfew as they stand with placards in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Anti-government protestors continue to defy the curfew as they wait to hear President Hosni Mubarak speak on television in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protesters wave a flag from a light pole near an effigy of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek after he gave a speech on his political future in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. In a pre-recorded televised address to the country, President Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but whether protesting Egyptians would agree with him about staying in office until elections later this year is uncertain. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protestors gather in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubare. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protesting Egyptian men watch Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek give a speech on a projected television screen in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. In a pre-recorded televised address to the country, President Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but whether protesting Egyptians would agree with him about staying in office until elections later this year is uncertain. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protestors gather in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protestors gather in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A man gives a victory sign in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubare. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: People hold up their identity cards as they enter Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubare. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A man sings anti-government slogans during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A man shouts anti-government slogans on a megaphone during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A man shouts anti-government slogans during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protestors gather in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A youth with an Egyptian flag painted on his face stands in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A poster placed on a lamp post calls for the return of the internet after it was shut down by the government on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 01: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) at the end of the trading day on February 1, 2011 in New York City. Despite investor's fears of the protests in Egypt spreading through global markets, the Dow Jones industrial average (INDU) rallied 148 points to close up over 12,000, its highest level in two years. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A youth waves Egyptian flags from a lamp post in Tahrir Square on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protesters watch Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek give a speech on a projected television screen in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. In a pre-recorded televised address to the country, President Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but whether protesting Egyptians would permit him stay in office until elections later this year is uncertain. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: Protesters show the soles of their shoes, a grave insult in Arab Muslim countries, as a reaction after Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek gave a speech to the nations on a projected television screen in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. In a pre-recorded televised address to the country, President Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but whether protesting Egyptians would agree with him about staying in office until elections later this year is uncertain. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 01: A protester shows the sole of their shoe, a grave insult in Arab Muslim countries, as a reaction after Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek gave a speech to the nations on a projected television screen in Tahrir Square February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. In a pre-recorded televised address to the country, President Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but whether protesting Egyptians would agree with him about staying in office until elections later this year is uncertain. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
A soldier holds a crying girl from his armored vehicle just outside Tahrir, or Liberation, Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city's main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power. (AP Photo/Victoria Hazou)
A soldier looks out of his armored vehicle just outside Tahrir, or Liberation, Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city's main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power. (AP Photo/Victoria Hazou)
An anti-government protester holds a banner showing a picture of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and reading "Bye Bye Mubarak" during the continuing demonstration in Tahrir square in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city's main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Young girls wave Egyptian flags atop an armored vehicle just outside Tahrir or Liberation Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011. More than a quarter-million people flooded into the heart of Cairo Tuesday, filling the city's main square in by far the largest demonstration in a week of unceasing demands for President Hosni Mubarak to leave after nearly 30 years in power. (AP Photo/Victoria Hazou)

Everyone suddenly burst out singing.

And laughing, and crying, and shouting and praying, kneeling on the road and kissing the filthy tarmac right in front of me, and dancing and praising God for ridding them of Hosni Mubarak – a generous moment, for it was their courage rather than divine intervention which rid Egypt of its dictator – and weeping tears which splashed down their clothes.

It was as if every man and woman had just got married, as if joy could smother the decades of dictatorship and pain and repression and humiliation and blood. Forever, it will be known as the Egyptian Revolution of 25 January – the day the rising began – and it will be forever the story of a risen people.



The old man had gone at last, handing power not to the Vice-President but – ominously, though the millions of non-violent revolutionaries were in no mood to appreciate this last night – to Egypt's army council, to a field marshal and a lot of brigadier generals, guarantors, for now, of all that the pro-democracy protesters had fought and, in some cases, died for.

Yet even the soldiers were happy. At the very moment when the news of Mubarak's demise licked like fire through the demonstrators outside the army-protected state television station on the Nile, the face of one young officer burst into joy. All day, the demonstrators had been telling the soldiers that they were brothers. Well, we shall see.

Talk of a historic day somehow took the edge off what last night's victory really means for Egyptians. Through sheer willpower, through courage in the face of Mubarak's hateful state security police, through the realisation – yes – that sometimes you have to struggle to overthrow a dictator with more than words and facebooks, through the very act of fighting with fists and stones against cops with stun guns and tear gas and live bullets, they achieved the impossible: the end – they must plead with their God that it is permanent – of almost 60 years of autocracy and repression, 30 of them Mubarak's.



Arabs, maligned, cursed, racially abused in the West, treated as backward by many of the Israelis who wanted to maintain Mubarak's often savage rule, had stood up, abandoned their fear, and tossed away the man whom the West loved as a "moderate" leader who would do their bidding at the price of $1.5bn a year. It's not only East Europeans who can stand up to brutality.



That this man – less than 24 hours earlier – had announced in a moment of lunacy that he still wanted to protect his "children" from "terrorism" and would stay in office, made yesterday's victory all the more precious. On Thursday night, the men and women demanding democracy in Egypt had held their shoes in the air to show their disrespect for the decrepit leader who treated them as infants, incapable of political and moral dignity. Then yesterday, he simply fled to Sharm el-Sheikh, a Western-style holiday resort on the Red Sea, a place which had about as much in common with Egypt as Marbella or Bali.



So the Egyptian Revolution lay in the hands of the army last night as a series of contradictory statements from the military indicated that Egypt's field marshals, generals and brigadiers were competing for power in the ruins of Mubarak's regime. Israel, according to prominent Cairo military families, was trying to persuade Washington to promote their favourite Egyptian – former intelligence capo and Vice-President Omar Suleiman – to the presidency, while Field Marshal Tantawi, the defence minister, wanted his chief of staff, General Sami Anan, to run the country.



When Mubarak and his family were freighted off to Sharm el-Sheikh yesterday afternoon, it only confirmed the impression that his presence was more irrelevant than provocative. The hundreds of thousands of protesters in Tahrir Square sniffed the same decay of power and even Mohamed ElBaradei, former UN arms inspector and ambitious Nobel Prize-winner, announced that "Egypt will explode" and "must be saved by the army".



Analysts talk about a "network" of generals within the regime, although it is more like a cobweb, a series of competing senior officers whose own personal wealth and jealously guarded privileges were earned by serving the regime whose 83-year old leader now appears as demented as he does senile. The health of the President and the activities of the millions of pro-democracy protesters across Egypt are thus now less important than the vicious infighting within the army.



Yet if they have discarded the rais – the President – the military's high command are men of the old order. Indeed, most of the army's highest-ranking officers were long ago sucked into the nexus of regime power. In Mubarak's last government, the vice- president was a general, the prime minister was a general, the deputy prime minister was a general, the minister of defence was a general and the minister of interior was a general. Mubarak himself was commander of the air force. The army brought Nasser to power. They supported General Anwar Sadat. They supported General Mubarak. The army introduced dictatorship in 1952 and now the protesters believe it will become the agency of democracy. Some hope.



Thus – sadly – Egypt is the army and the army is Egypt. Or so, alas, it likes to think. It therefore wishes to control – or "protect", as army communiqués constantly reiterate – the protesters demanding the final departure of Mubarak. But Egypt's hundreds of thousands of democratic revolutionaries – enraged by Mubarak's refusal to abandon the presidency – started their own takeover of Cairo yesterday, overflowing from Tahrir Square, not only around the parliament building but the Nile-side state television and radio headquarters and main highways leading to Mubarak's luxurious residency in the wealthy suburb of Heliopolis. Thousands of demonstrators in Alexandria reached the very gates of one of Mubarak's palaces where the presidential guard handed over water and food in a meek gesture of "friendship" for the people. Protesters also took over Talaat Haab Square in the commercial centre of Cairo as hundreds of academics from the city's three main universities marched to Tahrir at mid-morning.



After the fury expressed overnight at Mubarak's paternalistic, deeply insulting speech – in which he spoke about himself and his 1973 war service at great length and referred only vaguely to the duties he would supposedly reassign to his Vice-President, Omar Suleiman – yesterday's demonstrations began amid humour and extraordinary civility. If Mubarak's henchmen hoped that his near suicidal decision of Thursday would provoke the millions of democracy protesters across Egypt to violence, they were wrong; around Cairo, the young men and women who are the foundation of the Egyptian Revolution behaved with the kind of restraint that President Obama yesterday lamely called for. In many countries, they would have burned government buildings after a presidential speech of such hubris; in Tahrir Square, they staged poetry readings. And then they heard that their wretched antagonist had gone.



But Arab verse does not win revolutions, and every Egyptian knew yesterday that the initiative lay no more with the demonstrators than with the remote figure of the ex-dictator. For the future body politic of Egypt lies with up to a hundred officers, their old fidelity to Mubarak – sorely tested by Thursday's appalling speech, let alone the revolution on the streets – has now been totally abandoned. A military communiqué yesterday morning called for "free and fair elections", adding that Egyptian armed forces were "committed to the demands of the people" who should "resume a normal way of life". Translated into civilian-speak, this means that the revolutionaries should pack up while a coterie of generals divide up the ministries of a new government. In some countries, this is called a "coup d'etat".



Around Mubarak's abandoned Cairo palace yesterday morning, the presidential guard, themselves a separate and powerful paramilitary force within the army, unsheathed a mass of barbed wire around the perimeter of the grounds, set up massive sand-bag emplacements and placed soldiers with heavy machine-guns behind them. Tanks wire. It was an empty gesture worthy of Mubarak himself. For he had already fled.



But the army's instructions to its soldiers to care for the demonstrators appear to have been followed to the letter in the hours before victory. A 25-year-old first lieutenant in the Egyptian Third Army, a highly educated young man with almost fluent English, was helping the demonstrators to check the identities of protesters near the ministry of interior yesterday, cheerfully admitting that he wasn't sure if the protests in Cairo were the best way of achieving democracy. He had not told his parents that he was in central Cairo lest his mother be upset, telling them instead that he was on barrack duties.



But would he shoot the demonstrators in a confrontation, we asked him? "Many people ask me that question," he replied. "I tell them: 'I cannot shoot my father, my family – you are like my father and my own family.' And I have many friends here." And if orders came to shoot the protesters? "I am sure it will not happen," he said. "All the other revolutions [in Egypt] were bloody. I don't want blood here."



The soldier got his history right. Egyptians in Cairo rose against Napoleon's army in 1798, fought the monarchy in 1881 and 1882, staged an insurrection against the British in 1919 and 1952, and rebelled against Sadat in the 1977 food riots and against Mubarak in 1986, when even the police deserted the government. At least four soldiers in Tahrir Square defected to the demonstrators on Thursday. A colonel in the army told me a week ago that "one of our comrades tried to commit suicide" in Tahrir Square. So the generals now fighting like vultures over the wreckage of Mubarak's regime must take care that their own soldiers have not been infected by the revolution.



As for Omar Suleiman, his own post-Mubarak speech on Thursday night was almost as childish as the President's. He told the demonstrators to go home – treating them, in the words of one protester, like sheep – and duly blamed "television stations and radios" for violence on the streets, an idea as preposterous as Mubarak's claim – for the umpteenth time – that "foreign hands" were behind the revolution. His ambitions for the presidency may have also ended, another old man who thought he could close down the revolution with false promises.



Perhaps the shadow of the army is too dark an image to invoke in the aftermath of so monumental a revolution in Egypt. Siegfried Sassoon's joy on the day of the 1918 Armistice, the end of the First World War – when everyone also suddenly burst out singing – was genuine and deserved. Yet that peace led to further immense suffering. And the Egyptians who have fought for their future in the streets of their nation over the past three weeks will have to preserve their revolution from internal and external enemies if they are to achieve a real democracy. The army has decided to protect the people. But who will curb the power of the army?



Hosni Mubarak: Timeline



14 October 1981



Vice-President Hosni Mubarak is sworn in as President eight days after his predecessor, Anwar Sadat, was gunned down by Islamist militants at a parade in Cairo.



26 June 1995



Mubarak survives an assassination attempt in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa.



5 October 1999



Mubarak wins a fourth term, and appoints a new prime minister after the government resigns.



March 2005



The Kefaya (Enough) Movement stages protests across Egypt against Mubarak's rule.



11 May 2005



Egypt introduces contested presidential elections, but opposition parties complain that strict rules still prohibit genuine competition.



27 September 2005



Mubarak wins Egypt's first contested general election, a process which is marred by violence. He is sworn in for his fifth consecutive term.



19 November 2006



Mubarak declares that he will remain President for the rest of his life.



26 March 2010



Former UN nuclear agency chief Mohamed ElBaradei announces he would consider running for the presidency if reforms on power were introduced.



27 March 2010



After gallbladder surgery in Germany, Mubarak returns to Egypt to reassume his full presidential powers.



25 January 2011



Inspired by the ousting of Tunisia's President Ben Ali on 14 January, thousands protest across Egypt demanding Mubarak's resignation. It is called the "Day of Wrath".



29 January 2011



After deploying the army in an attempt to control the widespread protests, Mubarak sacks his cabinet and names intelligence chief Omar Suleiman as Vice-President. He refuses to step down.



1 February 2011



One million Egyptians march through Cairo demanding Mubarak's immediate resignation. Mubarak announces he will step down when his term ends in September.



3 February 2011



Mubarak tells reporters he is fed up with being in power, but thinks chaos will ensue if he steps down now. About 300 people have been killed in the unrest, according to UN figures.



5 February 2011



President Obama asks Mubarak to listen to the protesters demanding his resignation. Mubarak removes his son from a senior post and invites opposition groups to negotiate reform. They are dissatisfied with the concessions offered.



10 February 2011



Egypt's army commander addresses Cairo's Tahrir Square, saying "everything you want will be realised". After mounting speculation and reports that resignation is imminent, Mubarak refuses to step down.



11 February 2011



After 18 days of protests, Mubarak finally leaves office

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