Belfast Telegraph

Friday 29 April 2016

Egypt crisis: With every passing hour, the regime digs in deeper

Robert Fisk sees Cairo's protesters rally again in Tahrir Square

Published 09/02/2011

CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters move through Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters move through Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Thousands of anti-government protesters pack Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pass Egyptian army soldiers while entering Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pass Egyptian army soldiers while entering Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pass Egyptian army soldiers while entering Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters watch a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters watch a massive rally near sunset in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Thousands of Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters take part in a demonstration in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters shout slogans as they march in Alexandria, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb.8, 2011. Tens of thousands of Egyptians have been demonstrating in Cairo and other cities, calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. Arabic sign read ' Freedom is hard to get'. , ' get out'. (AP Photo/Tarek Fawzy)
Anti-government protesters hold an Egyptian flag during demonstrations in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
Thousands of anti-Mubarak protesters are seen next to an Egyptian army tank as they take part in a demonstration at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
An Egyptian married couple are surrounded by anti-Mubarak protesters at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, a Google Inc. marketing manager, who has become a hero of the demonstrators since he went missing on Jan. 27, two days after the protests began, hugs the mother of Khaled Said, a young 28-year-old businessman who died in June, 2010, at the hands of undercover police, setting off months of protests against the hated police, at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb.8, 2011. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Egyptian Muslim clerics file through the crowd in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. The arabic on the sign reads "The rage brings the light of freedom". (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, center, the 30-year-old Google Inc. marketing manager who was a key organizer of the online campaign that sparked the first protest on Jan. 25, talks to the crowd in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. A young leader of Egypt's anti-government protesters, newly released from detention, joined a massive crowd of hundreds of thousands in Cairo's Tahrir Square for the first time Tuesday, greeted by cheers, whistling and thunderous applause when he declared: "We will not abandon our demand and that is the departure of the regime." (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters hold an huge Egyptian flag as they take part in a demonstration at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. Protesters appear to have settled in for a long standoff, turning Tahrir Square into a makeshift village with tens of thousands coming every day, with some sleeping in tents made of blankets and plastic sheeting. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim, weakened after nearly two weeks in custody, is helped off the stage after greeting thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by Egyptian security forces yesterday evening. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters watch a massive rally near sunset in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim prepares to address anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. He was released yesterday after almost two weeks in the custody of Egyptian secuirty forces. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: A man holds a child on his shoulders during an anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another noisy mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim (C) gazes upon thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. He was released yesterday after almost two weeks in the custody of Egyptian secuirty forces. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim, weakened after nearly two weeks in custody, is helped off the stage after greeting thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by Egyptian security forces yesterday evening. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim, weakened after nearly two weeks in custody, is helped off the stage after greeting thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by Egyptian security forces yesterday evening. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: A man holds a child on his shoulders during an anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another noisy mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim greets thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by police yesterday after nearly two weeks in custody. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim (2L) greets thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Ghonim was released by police yesterday after nearly two weeks in custody. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters chant during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters chant during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters chant during a massive rally in Tahrir Square February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo have vowed to occupy the area until Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak quits, and marked the two-week anniversary of their efforts with another mass demonstration. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Thousands of anti-government protesters pack Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Thousands of anti-government protesters pack Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: An anti-government protester sleeps outside a closed travel agency in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Anti-government protesters cheer in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pray in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pray in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters pray in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters cheer in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Google marketing executive Wael Ghonim prepares to address anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. He was released yesterday after nearly two weeks in the custody of Egyptian secuirty forces. He has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that first sparked the protests in Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 08: Anti-government protesters cheer in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrator prays in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrator shows the victory sign as others shoot video on their celular phones in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators chant slogans for freedom in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrator shows the victory sign in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: A man and woman stand arm in arm in Tahrir Square, watching a protest speaker February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continues February 7, with protests continuing unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: A boy stands among waving Egyptian flags in Tahrir Square February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continues February 7, with protests continuing unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: A mother carries her newborn through Tahrir Square while looking at photographs of Egyptians killed during the uprising on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the protests began, thousands of demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
UNDATED - In this undated photo provided by Google, company executive Wael Ghonim is shown. Ghonim, who disappeared amid the chaos of massive protests that have shaken Egypt for two weeks, was released from government custody February 7, 2011. (Photo by Google via Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: His face painted in the national colors, anti-government protester Mamoud Tariq, 13, attends a demonstration in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the protests began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A public worker reacts behind razor wire as Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters, unseen, block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters react as others, unseen, block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters sit next to armored Army vehicles in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
People carry a symbolic coffin of Egyptian journalist Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, in symbolic funeral ceremony in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The reporter who was shot during clashes a week ago died of his wounds Friday, his employer said, in the first reported death of a journalist in the chaos surrounding Egypt's anti-government protests. Mahmoud worked for Al-Taawun, a newspaper put out by the Al-Ahram publishing house and lived near central Tahrir Square, the focal point of protest rallies as well as clashes this week between large crowds of supporters and opponents of President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Anti-government demonstrators gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators pray in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators pray in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) *** BESTPIX ***
Anti-government demonstrators pray in front an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators rest in front an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The protesters want the army to stay in the square, as protection against government supporters. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: An anti-government demonstrators shoots video on his celular phone in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 07: Anti-government demonstrators gather near an Egyptian army post in Tahrir Square on February 7, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Almost two weeks since the uprising began, thousands of protesters continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters walk past an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including families, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters react as others, unseen, block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Thousands of anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
People carry a symbolic coffin of Egyptian journalist Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, in symbolic funeral ceremony in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The reporter who was shot during clashes a week ago died of his wounds Friday, his employer said, in the first reported death of a journalist in the chaos surrounding Egypt's anti-government protests. Mahmoud worked for Al-Taawun, a newspaper put out by the Al-Ahram publishing house and lived near central Tahrir Square, the focal point of protest rallies as well as clashes this week between large crowds of supporters and opponents of President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Public workers are seen behind razor wire as Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters, unseen, block the street to cut their access to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Thousands of anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
Soldiers in a tank control traffic near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An anti-government protester wears a mouth gag reading "30 years, enough" in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
An effigy depicting Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak hangs while protesters wave Egyptian flags at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Anti-government protesters, one showing a poster depicting Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak as Hitler, camp in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, a Google Inc. marketing manager, talks at his home in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb.7, 2011. A Google manager held in Egypt for about 10 days over anti-government protests was freed Monday. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
Egyptian army soldiers and tanks are positioned in front of anti-government demonstrators, using barricades to prevent pro-government protesters, not seen, from approaching them, in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters block the street to cut the access of public workers to the Mogama, the main government service building, in a street leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 7, 2011. The protests, which saw tens of thousands of people massing daily in downtown Cairo for demonstrations that at times turned violent, have raised questions about the impact on the economy. More than 160,000 foreign tourists fled the country in a matter of days last week, in an exodus sure to hammer the vital tourism sector. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Two boys with with their faces painted in patriotic Egyptian colors as part of the anti-government movement talk in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many families, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government demonstrators clean up trash in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
Green balloons reading: "Yes to life" are held by pro-life movement activists during Pope Benedict XVI's Angelus prayer in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. The Pontiff says he is praying that Egypt can find tranquillity and peaceful coexistence. Benedict said he is attentively following the "delicate situation in the dear Egyptian nation,'' addressing thousands of pilgrims Sunday in St. Peter's. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An anti-government protester reads a Koran while leaning against makeshift barriers protecting the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An anti-government protester leans against makeshift barriers protecting the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An Egyptian Army soldier in riot gear stands watch in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Egyptian women in the anti-government movement march against president Hosni Mubarak in central Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: A wounded anti-government protester sits behind razor wire guarding the edge of the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Egyptian women in the anti-government movement march against president Hosni Mubarak in central Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An anti-government protester stands with an Egyptian flag behind razor wire guarding the edge of the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters who spent the night manning makeshift barriers protecting the anti-government movement in Tahrir Square eat breakfast the morning of February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off remains between anti and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square as the protests continue unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Egyptian soldiers in riot gear pull away a pro-Mubarak loyalist away from nearby anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. An uneasy stand-off between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continues unabated. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: An Egyptian army soldier watches as anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many families, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women and children, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 06: Anti-government protesters gather in Tahrir Square on February 6, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of demonstrators, including many women and children, turned out to continue their protest demanding the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
Anti-government protesters sit and lie inside the tracks of an Egyptian Army tank to prevent it from moving and to shield themselves from the rain, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator reads the news about the protests in a newspaper, as he stands in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator holds a baby, wearing a hat bearing the words "Leave", as thousands gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
A young girl cries after being perched on top of an Egyptian Army tank by a relative, left, in order for him to take a photo of her on his mobile phone, as other anti-government protesters sit down in front of the tanks to prevent them from moving, at the protest site opposite the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's vice president met a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began, though Al-Jazeera's English-language news network said one of its correspondents had been detained the same day by the Egyptian military. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators chant slogans as they gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's vice president met a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began, though Al-Jazeera's English-language news network said one of its correspondents had been detained the same day by the Egyptian military. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
A young Egyptian anti-government protester wearing face paint in the colors of the Egyptian flag is seen at the protest site opposite the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's vice president met a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began, though Al-Jazeera's English-language news network said one of its correspondents had been detained the same day by the Egyptian military. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator takes some rest in front of a barricade protecting the group from possible attacks by pro-government protesters in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator takes some rest in front of a barricade protecting the group from possible attacks by pro-government protesters in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator waves national flags as thousands gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak slogans designed by stone are written by protesters at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian anti-Mubarak protester chants anti-Mubarak slogans at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian anti-government protester puts a tape on his mouth with the word "Shut up" written in Arabic as he sits in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. State TV says the top leadership body of Egypt's ruling party, including the president's son Gamal Mubarak and the party secretary-general Safwat el-Sharif, resigned Saturday in a new gesture apparently aimed at convincing anti-government protesters that the regime is serious about reform. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators gather in Tahrir Square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. A sense of normalcy began to return to the capital of some 18 million people, which has been largely closed since chaos erupted shortly after the protests began on Jan. 25. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters celebrate during a symbolic funeral for President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. Arabic reads " No condolences", Condolences in Tel Aviv" and " killer failure. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs in a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
Egyptian anti-Mubarak protesters celebrate during a symbolic funeral for President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011. Egypt's largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, said it would begin talks Sunday with the government to try to end the country's political crisis but made clear it would insist on the immediate ouster of longtime authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak. Arabic read " No condolences", " get out". (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: A woman protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 5: A girl sits with signs sits during a protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak February 5, 2011 in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Egypt, a nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, erupted in widespread protests calling for Mubarak to step down following similar unrest in Tunisia last month. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government demonstrators rest while blocking an Egyptian army tank in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Egyptian army soldiers and tanks are positioned in front of anti-government demonstrators, to prevent clashes between Mubarak supporters, unseen, and anti-government protesters who shelter behind makeshift barricades, in Tahrir square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. Rallies in Cairo and behind-the-scenes diplomacy from the U.S. President Barack Obama administration is piling more pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to make a swift exit and allow a temporary government to embark on an immediate path toward democracy. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs in a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government protesters sweep up in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A suspected Egyptian policeman is led through a crowd after being captured in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An injured anti-government protester sleeps in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs at a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government protesters demand the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continue to occupy the square, calling for the end of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An effigy of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak hangs at a traffic intersection in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: An anti-government protester prays in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Thousands of the demonstrators continue to occupy the square, demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
Flames are seen after an explosion went off at a gas terminal in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 in El-Arish, setting off a massive fire. No injuries were reported, and the blaze was quickly brought under control after the gas flow was shut off. (AP Photo/Ashraf Swailem)
A family of anti-government protestors sits in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. Rallies in Cairo and behind-the-scenes diplomacy from the Obama administration is piling more pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to make a swift exit and allow a temporary government to embark on an immediate path toward democracy. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
A wounded anti-government protestor uses his cellular phone in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. Rallies in Cairo and behind-the-scenes diplomacy from the Obama administration is piling more pressure on Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to make a swift exit and allow a temporary government to embark on an immediate path toward democracy. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
A girl waves her national flag as anti-government protestors gather in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011
Egyptian army soldiers catch a plain clothes state security policeman, center, after he was discovered by anti-Mubarak protesters in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. US President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
Egyptian army soldiers catch a plain clothes state security policeman, center, after he was discovered by anti-Mubarak protesters in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
An Egyptian anti-Mubarak protester flashes the V sign in front of a tank in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Egyptian army soldiers remove debris from a destroyed vehicle as they plan to tow it away in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The army planned to tow away the vehicles, which demonstrators had been using as barracades against supporters of President Hosni Mubarak. Thousands of anti-government demonstrators continued to occupy the square in defiance of the Mubarak regime. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: Anti-government protesters march in Tahrir Square February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square quieted February 4, as anti-government protesters called for a "Day of Depature" and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: A anti-government protester stands in Tahrir Square February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square quieted February 4, as anti-government protesters called for a "Day of Depature" and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: Egyptian anti-government protesters stare down nearby pro-government protesters in Talaat Harb Square the afternoon of February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's city center diminished February 4, called "The day of departure" by anti-government protesters, as they claimed more of the city center and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: An exhausted anti-government youth sleeps on a curb on the edge of Tahrir Square February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square quieted February 4, as anti-government protesters called for a "Day of Depature" and renewed demands for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Egyptian soldiers stand behind a barbed wire barrier, as protesters walk past during anti-Mubarak protest in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. The Egyptian military guarded thousands of protesters pouring into Cairo's main square on Friday in an attempt to drive out President Hosni Mubarak after a week and half of pro-democracy demonstrations. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)
A wounded anti-government protester is carried after brief stone-throwing clashes with pro-government supporters in Talaat Harb square near Tahrir square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street battles. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
An anti-government protester sleeps on the ground in Tahrir, or Liberation Square, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. The Arabic on the sash reads "Popular Protection Committee". (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: Anti-government demonstrators pray while blocking an Egyptian army vehicle in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 05: A protester leads fellow anti-government demonstrators in chants against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 5, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Demonstrators, who remained in the Cairo's Tahrir Square following Friday's mass rally calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to resign, pleaded with the army to stay after hearing reports that they were pulling out. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: An unidentified man protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. According to published reports, about 500 people gathered behind police barricades calling for the long-time Egyptian leader's ouster. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: An unidentified woman protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. According to published reports, about 500 people gathered behind police barricades calling for the long-time Egyptian leader's ouster. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: A man protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: An unidentified man protests against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. According to published reports, about 500 people gathered behind police barricades calling for the long-time Egyptian leader's ouster. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: A woman holds up a picture of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak during a protest in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: American Stacy Mazzara was one of hundreds of people protesting against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 04: People protest against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Times Square on February 04, 2011 in New York City. Egypt, a Muslim nation that has a long and deep-seated relationship with America, is the latest Muslim country after Tunisia to be shaken by waves of violent protests demanding that the current regime step down. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) > on February 4, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Anti-government protestors dance in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Manoocher Deghati)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 04: Anti-government demonstrators chant in Tahrir Square on February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government protesters have called today 'The day of departure'. Thousands have again gathered in Tahrir Square calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
An anti-government protester sleeps in Tahrir, or Liberation Square, Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011. President Barack Obama said Egypt's Hosni Mubarak should do the statesmanlike thing and make a quick handoff to a more representative government. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)
An anti-government protester, wounded by stones hurled by pro-government protesters, is carried by a colleague, near Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street fights. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Anti-government protestors, look on behind makeshift barricades, in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street fights. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
An anti-government protestor holds a poster in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Feb. 4, 2011. Tens of thousands packed central Cairo Friday, waving flags and singing the national anthem, emboldened in their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak after they repelled pro-regime attackers in two days of bloody street fights. The U.S. was pressing Egypt for an immediate start to democratic transition, including a proposal for Mubarak to step down immediately. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A woman protesting against the Egyptian government uses a burned out car to make a phone call February 3, 2011 in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. The stand off between anti- and pro-President Hosni Mubarak factions in Egypt's central square continuted February 3, after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A wounded anti-government protester is carried off after being struck by a rock during clashes with pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester throws rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 03: Passengers arrive at Gatwick Airport's South Terminal on a Foreign Office-chartered flight from Cairo, Egypt on February 3, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Oli Scarff-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Anti-Mubarak protesters (bottom) clash with pro-Mubarak supporters in Tarhir Square, Cairo, Egypt, as the violence continues. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday February 3, 2011. At least eight people have been killed and hundreds injured in clashes in and around the Square, where pro-government attackers opened fire on protesters early this morning. See PA story POLITICS Egypt. Photo credit should read: Lewis Whyld/PA Wire
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An army tank keeps Supporters of President Mubarak (top) separate from anti-government protestors in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters taunt and throw rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester throws rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters carry rocks to throw at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A wounded anti-government protester is carried off after being struck by a rock during clashes with pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester taunts while throwing rocks at pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator is treated for a head wound after being hit by a rock in clashes on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator is treated for a head wound after being hit by a stone in clashes on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Egyptian army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government demonstrator holds a sign during clashes on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Initial protests against the government were organized on internet social media. The Egyptian army positioned tanks between the protesters during a second day of violent skirmishes in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protesters throw rocks at pro-government supporters as they try to protect themselves from incoming stones near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester is carried off after being wounded during clashes with pro-government supporters near a highway overpass on the edge of Tahrir Square the afternoon of February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Clashes between anti- and pro-government factions in Egypt's central square continued February 3, with anti-government forces gaining more territory outside of Tahrir Square from Egyptians loyal to the government of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protester exhorts fellow demonstrators to make space for Egyptian army soldiers on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army positioned tanks between the protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Egyptian men protest against the government of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek during a march in central Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarek factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A captured Egyptian man that anti-government protesters allege is a member of the Egyptian government security forces screams as his handcuffed are adjusted in an ad hoc anti-government command center February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government Egyptian leaders questioned the man and several other suspected security officers, who were captured near Tahrir Square, allegedly trying to blend in with anti-government protesters. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarak factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A protesting Egyptian man, who was struck in the face with a rock during recent clashes with supporters of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek, stands in central Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarek factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A captured Egyptian man suspected of being in the government security forces is roughly handled by anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Anti-government Egyptian leaders have captured dozens of Egyptians they allege are government police or intelligence officers, trying to blend in with anti-government protesters. The standoff between anti- and pro-Mubarek factions in Egypt's central square continued after a day and night of violence in which hundreds were injured in clashes. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protestors rest in a truck after clashes with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protestor holds a blooded Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) ***BESTPIX***
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protestors wave Egyptian flags in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An injured anti-government protestor rests amongst rocks in Tahrir Square after clashes with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: A man looks down from the window of a derelict house as anti-government protestors man barricades in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: An anti-government protestor holds a rock as he looks down on supporters of President Mubarak from the roof of a derelict house in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - FEBRUARY 03: Anti-government protestors look down from the roof of a derelict house in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. The Army have positioned tanks between protesters who had been battling with supporters of President Hosni Mubarak for the second day in and around Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
An Egyptian pro government protester shouts as he is held back by Army soldiers in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011. New clashes are heating up again and shots are being fired in the air around Cairo's central Tahrir Square as anti-government protesters push back regime supporters. The two sides are trading volleys of stone-throwing, but government backers are falling back and protesters are swarming onto a highway overpass from which their rivals had pelted them with stones and firebombs overnight. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

The Egyptian people yesterday honoured their dead in their tens of thousands for the largest protest march ever against President Hosni Mubarak's dictatorship, a sweating, pushing, shouting, weeping, joyful people, impatient, fearful that the world may forget their courage and their sacrifice.

It took three hours to force our way into the square, two hours to plunge through a sea of human bodies to leave. High above us, a ghastly photomontage flapped in the wind: Hosni Mubarak's head superimposed upon the terrible picture of Saddam Hussein with a noose round his neck.



Uprisings don't follow timetables. And Mubarak will search for some revenge for yesterday's renewed explosion of anger and frustration at his 30-year rule. For two days, his new back-to-work government had tried to portray Egypt as a nation slipping back into its old, autocratic torpor. Gas stations open, a series of obligatory traffic jams, banks handing out money – albeit in suitably small amounts – shops gingerly doing business, ministers sitting to attention on state television as the man who would remain king for another five months lectured them on the need to bring order out of chaos – his only stated reason for hanging grimly to power.



But Issam Etman proved him wrong. Shoved and battered by the thousands around him, he carried his five-year- old daughter Hadiga on his shoulders. "I am here for my daughter," he shouted above the protest. "It is for her freedom that I want Mubarak to go. I am not poor. I run a transport company and a gas station. Everything is shut now and I'm suffering, but I don't care. I am paying my staff from my own pocket. This is about freedom. Anything is worth that." And all the while, the little girl sat on Issam Etman's shoulders and stared at the epic crowds in wonderment; no Harry Potter extravaganza would match this.





Many of the protesters – so many were flocking to the square yesterday evening that the protest site had overflowed onto the Nile river bridges and the other squares of central Cairo – had come for the first time. The soldiers of Egypt's Third Army must have been outnumbered 40,000 to one and they sat meekly on their tanks and armoured personnel carriers, smiling nervously as old men and youths and young women sat around their tank tracks, sleeping on the armour, heads on the great steel wheels; a military force turned to impotence by an army of dissent. Many said they had come because they were frightened; because they feared the world was losing interest in their struggle, because Mubarak had not yet left his palace, because the crowds had grown smaller in recent days, because some of the camera crews had left for other tragedies and other dictatorships, because the smell of betrayal was in the air. If the Republic of Tahrir dries up, then the national awakening is over. But yesterday proved that the revolution is alive.



Its mistake was to underestimate the ability of the regime to live too, to survive, to turn on its tormentors, to switch off the cameras and harass the only voice of these people – the journalists – and to persuade those old enemies of revolution, the "moderates" whom the West loves, to debase their only demand. What is five more months if the old man goes in September? Even Amr Moussa, most respected of the crowds' favourite Egyptians, turns out to want the old boy to carry on to the end. And woeful, in truth, is the political understanding of this innocent but often untutored mass.



Regimes grow iron roots. When the Syrians left Lebanon in 2005, the Lebanese thought that it was enough to lop off the head, to get the soldiers and the intelligence officers out of their country. But I remember the astonishment with which we all discovered the depth of Syria's talons. They lay deep in the earth of Lebanon, to the very bedrock. The assassinations went on. And so, too, it is in Egypt. The Ministry of Interior thugs, the state security police, the dictator who gives them their orders, are still in operation – and if one head should roll, there will be other heads to be pasted onto the familiar portrait to send those cruel men back into the streets.



There are some in Egypt – I met one last night, a friend of mine – who are wealthy and genuinely support the democracy movement and want Mubarak to go but are fearful that if he steps now from his palace, the military will be able to impose their own emergency laws before a single reform has been discussed. "I want to get reforms in place before the man leaves," my friend said. "If he goes now, the new leader will be under no obligation to carry out reforms. These should be agreed to now and done quickly – it's the legislature, the judiciary, the constitutional changes, the presidential terms that matter. As soon as Mubarak leaves, the men with brass on their shoulders will say: 'It's over – go home!' And then we'll have a five-year military council. So let the old man stay till September."



But it's easy to accuse the hundreds of thousands of democracy protestors of naivety, of simple-mindedness, of over-reliance on the Internet and Facebook. Indeed, there is growing evidence that "virtual reality" became reality for the young of Egypt, that they came to believe in the screen rather than the street – and that when they took to the streets, they were deeply shocked by the state violence and the regime's continued, brutal, physical strength. Yet for people to taste this new freedom is overwhelming. How can a people who have lived under dictatorship for so long plan their revolution? We in the West forget this. We are so institutionalized that everything in our future is programmed. Egypt is a thunderstorm without direction, an inundation of popular expression which does not fit neatly into our revolutionary history books or our political meteorology.



All revolutions have their "martyrs", and the faces of Ahmed Bassiouni and young Sally Zahrani and Moahmoud Mohamed Hassan float on billboards around the square, along with pictures of dreadfully mutilated heads with the one word "unidentified" printed beside them with appalling finality. If the crowds abandon Tahrir now, these dead will also have been betrayed. And if we really believe the regime-or-chaos theory which still grips Washington and London and Paris, the secular, democratic, civilized nature of this great protest will also be betrayed. The deadly Stalinism of the massive Mugamma government offices, the tattered green flag of the pathetic Arab League headquarters, the military-guarded pile of the Egyptian Museum with the golden death mask of Tutankhamen – a symbol of Egypt's mighty past – buried deep into its halls; these are the stage props of the Republic of Tahrir.



Week three – day sixteen – lacks the romance and the promise of the Day of Rage and the great battles against the Egyptian Ministry of Interior goons and the moment, just over a week ago, when the army refused Mubarak's orders to crush, quite literally, the people in the square. Will there be a week six or a day 32? Will the cameras still be there? Will the people? Will we? Yesterday proved our predictions wrong again. But they will have to remember that the iron fingernails of this regime have long ago grown into the sand, deeper than the pyramids, more powerful than ideology. We have not seen the last of this particular creature. Nor of its vengeance.

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