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Growth in food banks shows that polite negotiations with super rich to fight inequality have never worked

letter of the day: gross inequality

The increased use of food banks across the north is deeply troubling. We should be outraged. Families can't afford to buy food. Thousands of children are dependent on 'emergency' meals.

Recent figures from The Trussell Trust sit uncomfortably alongside the recently released Sunday Times Rich List, revealing the number of billionaires and their overall wealth, which is growing here and across the UK.

Thousands of working class people from all communities are forced to go to food banks for emergency meals, because a few people are getting away with hoarding billions.

We are at a tipping point when it comes to the spreading of poverty and the destruction of our public services, low pay and benefits cuts. This is why people are forced to go to food banks in the first place.

The increased use of food banks is yet another symbol of Westminster and Stormont's bankruptcy when it comes to meeting the needs of the vast majority.

No matter how much Establishment political parties here talk about equality and justice, these statistics demonstrate their failure to deliver.

People Before Profit agree with Jeremy Corbyn's plan to increase taxes on the super-rich and corporations to begin to address this crisis. This won't happen without political will and people power. Polite negotiations with the super-rich and their political representatives to institute equality have never worked - and will never work.

Promises to address gross inequality won't happen without mass mobilisations - here and across the water.

If elected on June 8, People Before Profit members will vote to increase taxes on the super-rich and corporations. At the same time, we will use this platform to encourage all-out resistance to policies hurting working-class people.

shaun harkin

People Before Profit candidate in Foyle

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