Belfast Telegraph

Wednesday 23 July 2014

How we got rid of paramilitary flags

I have just read the letter from your reader in Comber concerning the issue of paramilitary flags (Write Back, August 20).

I live in east Belfast and we had a problem in my area in the past.

At this point I should say that I am a Protestant, but live in a somewhat mixed area.

We had been on holiday to Spain and came back to find flags hanging from every lamppost in the street.

What made matters worse was when I found out that men in masks had come round with ladders and, because the police were short staffed at the time, they basically could only stand and watch the proceedings.

I heard from a neighbour that the road had been temporarily closed while this took place — much to the annoyance and inconvenience of residents and passing motorists.

One of my neighbours who was in a mixed marriage decided to take action. To cut a long story short the local Alliance party candidate for the area was involved and, after discussions with police and other bodies, eventually the flags were removed.

I am not saying this would necessarily work in the Comber area, but might be worth a shot.

Union Jacks or Ulster flags in loyalist areas are one thing and I have no problem with that, provided it is what all residents want.

Personally I would prefer no flags in the street and most definitely not paramilitary ones.



FLAG SYMPATHISER

Belfast

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