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On exam results days DEL tend to locate their careers advisers centrally rather than attend individual schools (where there would be more need for them).

Published 31/08/2015

On exam results days DEL tend to locate their careers advisers centrally rather than attend individual schools (where there would be more need for them).

In Northern Ireland last year, over 30,000 students sat GCSE exams and over 25,000 sat A-levels.

The Belfast Careers Service would cover tens of thousands of pupils amongst these numbers.

Despite widespread media coverage and promotion of their service, on results day, only four students turned up at the resource centre with regards to GCSE results and none turned up for advice on A-level results.

Numbers using the service are small and this represents an extravagant waste of public money.

The Careers Service should be scrapped and the money given to schools to enhance their in-house careers education programmes.

Careersman

Grammars always want as many pupils as possible to go to a university no matter if it is in the pupil's long-term interests. It is all about the grammar schools looking good in stats. So we have a huge percentage of enthusiastic young achievers studying courses that will not lead to a real job.

Grammars and the universities couldn't care less about this. It is all about looking good for the grammars, and getting as many bums on seats as possible for the universities - this means cash.

My 21-year-old son, who has good GCSEs, excellent A-levels and a good HND, can hardly even get an interview. He applies but no one even bothers to reply back.

Companies use young people for internships, and when the period is up they are dumped and another hopeful takes their place.

TJMcClean

I see nothing has changed with the so-called Careers Service both inside and outside of schools in the 30 years since I left school!

Realist1234

To get a job you need training. Schools and universities provide education. There is a difference. Training costs money. Apart from a few areas such as law, training is not provided by universities.

Some employers will train, but again this costs money. Training is an investment. As the job seeker will be the beneficiary, it seems reasonable that they should pay, at least in part.

Philip41

Belfast Telegraph

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