Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 21 September 2014

Billy on the Box: Corden in an awful league of his own

It’s a tough question — just who is the most annoying James on television right now?

Is it Mr Oliver, saviour of the world’s eating habits and now tackling schools? I eagerly await Jamie’s Perfect Prisons with Mr Mackay and the cast of Fraggle Rock sorting out a few felons.

Or is Mr Redknapp. Professional obscene trouser wearer, stater of the bleedin’ obvious and loveable Cockney barrowboy who knows a lot of famous people.

Or is it Mr Corden? Of course it is. And he showed why on the inexplicable return of A League of Their Own 3.

“This isn’t a show, it’s a social experiment,” said panelist John Bishop. That has gone very badly wrong.

“This time it’s bigger, it’s longer and who knows it might even be better.” As Corden’s dad, Mr Loaf, once said ‘two out of three ain’t bad.

Lots of swearing from Freddie Flintoff, Phil Taylor saying next to nothing, Georgie Thompson (pictured) being lovely and Jimmy Carr being Jimmy Carr. Jokes about paedophiles, the homeless and starving Africans — it was never like this on Sporting Triangles.

Biggest laugh of the night came from Corden when he did an impression of Basil Brush, wetting himself as he shouted ‘boom, boom!’. Cutting edge stuff this. There is an obvious comparison, of course. One a cuddly, comic genius you’d love to see being chased by a pack of dogs; the other one is a fox.

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Nightlife galleries

More

Latest Sport News

Stats Centre