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Clement is ready to study stats in Swansea survival quest

By Phil Blanche

New Swansea boss Paul Clement will work alongside 'Moneyball' expert Dan Altman to target recruits in the January transfer window. Clement was officially unveiled as the club's new head coach yesterday two days after his appointment and stepping on to the touchline at Crystal Palace, where a 2-1 victory lifted Swansea within a point of Premier League safety.

The 44-year-old's predecessor Bob Bradley had spoken of a list of January transfer targets that Swansea had drawn up before his departure last week.

But Clement admits he has some of his own targets in mind after choosing to swap life as Carlo Ancelotti's assistant at Bayern Munich for a Premier League relegation battle.

"I've had assurances from the club that the opportunity will be there in the transfer window," Clement said.

"Before I came there were discussions and targets, those targets are known to me now.

"I bring with me some of my own ideas and thoughts on where we need to strengthen and players I've seen and like.

"It has to be done quickly. But I'm gathering information, that started against Palace, and it's only fair to see what they (the current players) can offer."

Swansea were taken over last summer by an American consortium fronted by Steve Kaplan and Jason Levien, and have hired former economics journalist Altman, of North Yard Analytics, as the club's 'Moneyball' expert.

Moneyball is the use of statistical analysis to buy what is undervalued and sell what is overvalued.

And Clement is comfortable with the input of New York-based Altman using data to analyse the current squad and help identify transfer targets.

"I'm a believer statistical analysis should be part of the jigsaw puzzle that goes together to help recruit players and assess your own team," Clement said.

"I have experience of this. I've travelled in the United States and visited a number of sports teams that use data."

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