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Gerry Taggart: Scotland's pink kits just part of modern game

By Stuart McKinley

Published 24/11/2015

Handout photo dated 22/11/2015 provided by SNS of (L-R) Scotland's Scott Brown, Callum Paterson, Rachel Corsie and Leanne Crichton wearing the new Scotland home and away kits during the unveiling of the new Scotland kit at JD Sports Superstore, Glasgow. PRESS ASSSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday November 22, 2015. Photo credit should read: Alan Harvey/SNS/PA Wire. NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
Handout photo dated 22/11/2015 provided by SNS of (L-R) Scotland's Scott Brown, Callum Paterson, Rachel Corsie and Leanne Crichton wearing the new Scotland home and away kits during the unveiling of the new Scotland kit at JD Sports Superstore, Glasgow. PRESS ASSSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday November 22, 2015. Photo credit should read: Alan Harvey/SNS/PA Wire. NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
28 Apr 1999: Tom Boyd of Scotland on the ball in the International Friendly at the Weserstadion in Bremen, Germany. Scotland won 1-0. \ Mandatory Credit: Gary M Prior/Allsport

You've got to feel sorry for Scottish football fans. Nothing has been going for the Tartan Army of late.

Not only will they be left home alone while the rest of the British Isles are enjoying themselves in France at next summer's Euro 2016 finals, the Scottish FA then go and make things worse by launching a couple of new kits that make the hugely unpopular Northern Ireland home shirt - with the blue chest band and blue sleeves - look like a catwalk classic.

The Scots will wear a navy tartan with white sleeves ensemble at home, while on their travels the players will don pink shirts. Yes, pink!

Former Northern Ireland international Gerry Taggart, a rugged centre-half who would probably have turned a shade of red if he'd been asked to play in a pink kit, puts the choice of colour down to the 'anything goes' nature of football these days.

"Times have changed that much in football and you see a lot of things with kits that you wouldn't have years ago," said Taggart. "I'm not sure what old team-mates of mine would have made of it back in the day, but we'd have looked a bit daft.

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"I suppose if it gets you recognition in the media then anything goes.

"I am sure that the Scotland players will take a bit of stick. Scott Brown's the captain of Celtic and I am sure the Rangers fans will let him know what they think of him when he's wearing pink."

It may be approaching two decades since Scotland reached a major finals, when Craig Brown took them to the 1998 World Cup in France, but they've been in the pink on other occasions.

An away kit in the early 1990s was described as 'coral' but was more pink than orange. Later in the 90s pink appeared again at a time when football fashion took a turn for the worse.

Other teams have worn pink too, although some have looked like a red sock has mistakenly been left in the white wash.

At least there is no excuse for the Scotland players missing their team-mates when trying to pick out a pass - unlike Manchester United when Sir Alex Ferguson demanded his team change out of their grey away kit to the blue and white strip at half-time in a game against Southampton in the 1990s, because he said the players couldn't see each other.

The Scots' midfield hardman Brown was at least spared having to wear the pink shirt when he took part in the launch event, being given the tartan home jersey instead.

Belfast Telegraph

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