Belfast Telegraph

Roberto Mancini finally puts away Manchester City chequebook

Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini has said the club have finished their incredible spending spree.

England midfielder James Milner joins a new illustrious cast, following the path taken to Eastlands in recent weeks by David Silva, Mario Balotelli, Jerome Boateng, Yaya Toure and Aleksander Kolarov.

Asked if Milner was his final signing, Mancini said: “I think so. He is a good young player, who can play in every position in the middle and out wide.”

City have been far and away England's biggest spenders this summer and Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson complained about the “kamikaze” attitude of some clubs in the transfer market although he did not mention City by name.

Mancini said: “If you want to buy a new player you must spend money. It is the market.

“I respect his (Ferguson's) opinion but Manchester United, not Manchester City spent a lot of money in the past.”

Milner's future had been the subject of ongoing speculation since Villa rejected a bid of around £20million from City in May.

The two clubs finally agreed a fee but the deal was held up still further by the involvement of Ireland, who reportedly demanded a £2million pay-off from City

Milner replaces Ireland as City's number seven and Mancini said: “I hope things go well for Stevie at Villa.

“He is also a very good player and he has played a big part in City's history. I think he will enjoy the chance of being at another club and I hope he does well for Aston Villa.”

Milner will sit out City's Europa League play-off first leg match tonight against Timisoara and instead could make his debut against Liverpool on Monday. Mancini believes City have the squad to gain success at home and abroad.

He said: “The Europa League is very important for me, the players and the supporters.

“We play all games to win no matter the competition. But this match will be tough as it is our first game and we are away from home.”

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