Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

Home Sport Football

Steven Davis indifferent to Northern Ireland's controversial new home strip

Published 12/11/2015

Northern Ireland's Steven Davis is unconcerned about debates over the team's new home kit
Northern Ireland's Steven Davis is unconcerned about debates over the team's new home kit

Northern Ireland captain Steven Davis insists getting to Euro 2016 is more important than the shirt players will wear once they are there.

Many fans were left underwhelmed by the design of the country's new home kit last week, with some unimpressed by the blue sleeves and two-tone horizontal blue stripe joining the traditional green and white colouring.

A petition calling for the shirt to be scrapped has attracted more than 6,000 signatures but the Irish Football Association has reported record pre-sales, boosted by the side's qualification for next summer's finals.

A new away jersey followed on Thursday, predominantly white with a green stripe, and was welcomed with greater warmth.

But Davis, who will don the new home shirt for the first time against Latvia on Friday, believes there are bigger concerns for the squad.

"I don't think it's going to be top priority," he said.

"The kit is not really in the back of our minds to be honest. The main thing for the players is to make sure we're on that plane when it takes off for France."

Only injury could prevent the skipper from lining up in France next summer, but with some squad regulars set to miss out on the final 23-man party, Davis sees a competitive edge in the camp.

"These games are important in our preparation," he said.

"We've talked many times before about momentum in football and we want to keep hitting the standards we set.

The Irish FA's previous deal with Adidas ended in 1990, heralding the introduction of a new Umbro kit (worn above by Iain Dowie), with a strange combination of green triangles and white lines. The blue away kit, which was along similar lines, was never worn by the senior team.
The Irish FA's previous deal with Adidas ended in 1990, heralding the introduction of a new Umbro kit (worn above by Iain Dowie), with a strange combination of green triangles and white lines. The blue away kit, which was along similar lines, was never worn by the senior team.
The quartered green and blue home version went down well with some.
The red and white quartered away kit wasn't a big hit and was only worn once - albeit in a win against Slovakia.
Blues sleeves are nothing new. The late '90s version, worn above by Keith Gillespie, was a bit of a monstrosity, though, and the away kit, which one grey sleeve and one red, was even worse.
Thankfully, this was only seen once, but fans remember it fondly as the team beat the Republic of Ireland in Dublin.
The retro shirt for the IFA's 125th anniversary was more popular, but the shade of green was very 'un-Northern Ireland like'.
Could the new home shirt top the rest as the worst?

"One thing that's definitely improved in the squad over the last campaign is the intensity in training, the competition for places getting stronger...that will continue to be the case because people are going to be desperate to go to the Euros."

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Read More

From Belfast Telegraph