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Dublin's Philly McMahon to follow Armagh's game plan

BY John Campbell

Armagh manager Paul Grimley referred to his team's herculean effort against Donegal on Saturday as "a game of patience." And his observation hasn't been lost on Dublin's defensive lynch-pin Philly McMahon.

Grimley had warned his team in advance that they would have to play a waiting game in terms of attempting to break down the normally water-tight Donegal defence.

McMahon, man-of-the-match in Dublin's 17-point win over Monaghan, believes his team must take Grimley's on-board philosophy if they are to overcome Donegal in the All-Ireland semi-final.

Indeed, his passion is palpable when it comes to assessing the challenge his side will face.

"I've never played against a side that puts 15 men behind the ball, but at the same time Donegal could come out the next day and play very differently," said McMahon.

"We have to prepare for everything. I will definitely be reminding people of the need for us to show patience."

The memory of the flat, uninspiring semi-final contest between the teams in 2011, when Dublin eventually won by 0-8 to 0-6, is still vivid from McMahon's perspective given that he came on as a substitute for Rory O'Carroll.

Now Dublin, who have scored a massive 9-88 in just four championship games face a Donegal outfit which scrambled past Monaghan in the Ulster final and just managed to hurdle a Armagh by a point last Saturday, but McMahon is quick to dispel any notion that Dublin are already fully-equipped for any challenge because of their impressive recent track record.

" We've a lot of things to work on and that's what we'll do over the next three weeks," he said.

Belfast Telegraph

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