Belfast Telegraph

Sunday 13 July 2014

Joey Dunlop: Tributes to an incredible talent

The Joey Dunlop memorial in Talinn, the final destination for The Lost Riders, the group of fans who followed a journey made by their hero

Figures from the world of motorcycling remember Joey Dunlop

Mervyn White, Race Director at the North West 200

“He has to be the greatest road racer we have ever had. What he put into the sport was unbelievable and even after all these years he is still sadly missed. I remember Joey in his own quiet way. He just turned up, raced motorbikes and there was no fuss or no hassle with him.”

Ryan Farquhar, the only racer to surpass Joey’s total of 118 Irish National wins

“From very early on in his career, Joey was the hero. Whenever I went to a road race I wanted to see the yellow helmet coming round first. I remember the first time I stood on the podium with him, it was at the Ulster Grand Prix in 1997. That was very special. The sport is all the poorer today without him.”

Sammy Graham, was Joey’s mechanic from 1979-2000

“He was fantastic. In my opinion, one of the greatest, if not the greatest, sportsmen to come from this country. He was definitely a one-off. There will never be another Joey.”

Phillip McCallen, Joey’s Honda team-mate for 10 years

“He was God in motorcycle racing. A lot of people would have thought he was invincible. There is not a race or an event that his name does not come up in some way or another. So, even though he’s not here today he’s still well remembered and well respected.”

Carl Fogarty, four times World Superbike Champion and personal friend

“He was a hero of mine since before I was racing and to end up racing against him and then on the same team as him was something special. I have always been a fan. He was so special and there will never be another like him.”

Roger Marshall, Honda team-mate, 1983-1986

“He was Mr Road Racer. He was a real character and had a real dry sense of humour. With Joey you got what you saw and that was it.”

Davy Wood, manager

“Everybody liked the fact that he was a modest guy, he didn’t blow his own trumpet. There were even Formula One drivers at his funeral. They went unnoticed because everybody was there for Joey — a man who they could relate to and yet a superstar.”

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