Belfast Telegraph

Friday 18 April 2014

Jib scores in eyecatching style

Dermot Weld

Dermot Weld looks to have a decent juvenile on his hands in the shape of Flying Jib, who won the Irish Stallion Farms EBF Fillies Maiden at Dundalk in eyecatching style.

A promising fourth on her Curragh debut, the daughter of Oasis Dream had David Wachman's Tap Dancing a length and a quarter in front of her that day and the two renewed rivalry.

Flying Jib (6-4) travelled sweetly up to challenge the 11-8 favourite at the furlong pole and when Pat Smullen pressed the button she smoothly went clear to score by four and a quarter lengths.

The jockey said: "She had a fairly good run the first day at the Curragh and the step up to seven furlongs suited. She travelled sweetly and quickened up well. To be honest, coming here today I expected to beat Wayne's filly (Tap Dancing)."

Smullen doubled up when the Tracey Collins-trained Balmont Belle (12-1) got the better of a ding-dong battle with Wachman's odds-on favourite Orator, another ridden by Wayne Lordan, to take the Bar One Racing Telebetting 1800 624 524 Maiden by three-quarters of a length.

Like A Diamond, withdrawn in controversial circumstances at Ballinrobe last month having been backed from 50-1 into 3-1, ran well on his debut. A steady 7-1 this time, the Sharon Dunphy-trained gelding travelled well early in the straight to throw down a challenge but could find no extra in the final furlong and eventually finished fourth.

Winning trainer Collins said: "I think stamina won the day, and Pat gave her a lovely ride. The flat track here helped as she wasn't suited by the undulations at Wexford the last day."

It was Wachman's turn when 11-10 favourite Pleasant Bay made the most of his chance in the Irish Stallion Farms EBF Maiden after market rival Sniper reared in the stalls and lost valuable ground in the six-furlong contest.

Lordan, back from duty in Chicago on Saturday night, held third position for most of the way and grabbed Wateed inside the final furlong before taking the prize by half a length.

The jockey said: "He travelled well, but he was fairly raw when I brought him to challenge. He rolled about quite a bit. He's always worked like a good horse, but he was a bit greener than I thought he'd be. He handled the surface well. He needs good ground and I'd say he wouldn't mind going a bit further."