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May's relief at breaking duck against All Blacks

By Nick Purewal

England wing Jonny May insists his spectacular try in Saturday's 24-21 defeat by New Zealand has relieved the pressure generated by his previous white line fever.

The All Blacks departed Twickenham as comprehensive winners in contradiction of the final score, but the Red Rose management could at least draw comfort from seeing their faith in May being rewarded.

Only two minutes were on the clock when May gathered the ball in midfield, accelerated around Conrad Smith and then outpaced Israel Dagg to touch down in the left corner.

It was a sensational burst of speed that bewitched the classy Smith and Dagg, enabling the Gloucester threequarter to cross for the first time in eight Tests in a cathartic moment having dropped the ball over the line against Ireland in February.

"I'm so happy to have done that. I feel as though that has been coming for a while now. It's almost a demon off the back to get that first try," May said.

"As a winger you want to score tries and the pressure does build on you when you don't. I remember just thinking after the Ireland game... 'bloody hell'.

"You just want that chance to prove what you can and I'm glad I had the chance to put what happened against Ireland right."

England's patience with May appeared to have been exhausted during the summer after he was dropped in the wake of the first Test defeat by New Zealand in Auckland.

Head coach Stuart Lancaster was dismissive of a player criticised for running sideways too often, but the lack of form shown by Marland Yarde and Jack Nowell offered a reprieve that resulted in a score to savour.

"It was a great feeling. I'm over the moon and will remember that forever," he said.

"Hopefully it's the first of many tries and I can move forward from here. I knew I could do it and the coaches knew I could as well.

"I'm glad they've shown patience with me and that I've been able to pay them back."

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