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Price confident Scotland can end long wait for Twickenham win over England

Ali Price insists Scotland will march on Twickenham determined to end more than three decades of failure against England in London.

The Scots have not sacked the home of their oldest rivals since a 22-12 win in the 1983 Five Nations, suffering 15 defeats in 16 visits in the meantime.

But confidence is surging through the Dark Blues ranks after they notched up their second win of this year's RBS 6 Nations with a stirring second-half display to slay Wales.

And scrum-half Price - who performed admirably as injured skipper Greig Laidlaw's understudy at Murrayfield - believes that swagger can see them surge past England in a fortnight's time.

Asked if they could win at Twickenham, the Glasgow man said emphatically: "Yeah, of course.

"We've got two weeks now to prepare for the England game. We look at every game as a game we can go and win.

"So we'll prepare well and we'll go down there knowing if we play how we can play, and play to our game plan, then we'll leave there with a win."

This Scotland side have made a habit of re-writing the history books so far this campaign.

Their win over Ireland was the first time they had opened a Six Nations campaign with victory since 2006, while Saturday's 29-13 victory not only earned them their first triumph against Wales in 10 years, but it was also their biggest winning margin against the men from the Principality since 1993.

Victory over England will secure a first Triple Crown since the nation's famous Grand Slam team conquered all in 1990.

That they achieved their most recent win without Laidlaw is all the more impressive. The Gloucester man's role as scrum-half, chief goal-kicker and master tactician left head coach Vern Cotter with three problems to solve in his absence.

Price took on the nine shirt, while stand-off Finn Russell proved himself just as reliable with the boot, slotting over seven successful kicks from seven attempts.

But the team took a collective approach to decision-making and it paid dividends as Scotland responded to a fairly flat performance during the opening 40 minutes with a second-half display full of bravado, capped off by two magnificent scores from Tommy Seymour and Tim Visser.

"We're all incredibly happy," said Price after making his first Test start. "That's the first time we've won in 10 years against Wales so obviously everyone is delighted, especially with how we came out in the second half.

"We were four points down at half-time but we always knew if we played our game we could come out on top.

"I didn't feel much pressure replacing Greig. As a nine you play quite an important role in the team anyway. You get the most touches in a game at scrum-half. I've been given full confidence from the coaches just to go out there and play my game.

"I'm not Greig, so I was told not to try and play like Greig, just to go out there and play my own game. Having Finn playing outside me - obviously we play together at Glasgow - helped a lot.

"There were a number of guys in training making themselves heard - Ryan Wilson, obviously John Barclay as captain, Jonny and Richie Gray, Finn, Stuart Hogg, while Alex Dunbar leads our defence at 12 - everyone needed to step up and bring more leadership to the party and I felt like we did that."

The Welsh kicked-off with a starting XV containing 300 more caps than the Scots line-up.

But Cotter's team gave another indication of the strides they are making by refusing to panic when Rob Howley's visitors threatened to runaway during the early contests.

And Price believes this Dark Blues squad will get even better with age.

"That's was only my third appearances but there are guys like Finn who is up to mid-20s now or early-30s in terms of caps," he said.

"Jonny's around the 30 mark, the back row are getting on for 20 to 30 caps. That whole wave of people are all now a lot more experienced and have been in that position before. The more experience you get the better at handling those situations you'll become.

"I'm constantly learning - you're not going to make a break or a half-break off every phase of play. You've got to pick your moment.

"On Saturday, we had to show patience. In the end we started to get a lot more space, especially out wide. Hoggy and our two wingers did incredibly well. It's something that I'm learning. I've been in that situation before and it's not about trying to win the game in the first 20 minutes. It's not going to happen."

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