Belfast Telegraph

Monday 28 July 2014

Robinson wants to continue progression

Scotland coach Andy Robinson wants Scotland to continue momentum this summer

Head coach Andy Robinson is eager for Scotland to carry the momentum from their successful summer tour into the new season, beginning with the autumn internationals against New Zealand, South Africa and Tonga.

Robinson's side responded to the RBS 6 Nations whitewash and Wooden Spoon with Test wins in June against Australia, Fiji and Samoa and face three further southern hemisphere sides at home in November.

Scotland play World Cup winners New Zealand on November 11, South Africa six days later, before playing Tonga in Aberdeen in the final EMC Test on November 24. "We're looking forward to challenging ourselves against the very best," Robinson said.

"We get back together at the end of October and as a group I'm looking forward to building on the successes that we had in the summer.

"They're the right challenges to see if we can make the progress and build on the progress that we had in the summer tour."

Scotland have never beaten the All Blacks and lost the most recent meeting in November 2010 49-3.

A week later they responded by defeating the Springboks, then the world champions, before claiming victory over Samoa at Pittodrie.

A strong series of results would not only help ahead of the forthcoming Six Nations - Robinson's men travel to Twickenham to play England in the opening game on February 2 - but improve Scotland's hopes for the 2015 Rugby World Cup draw, which will take place in early December.

"These games matter," Robinson added. "They are Test matches where we pit ourselves against some of the best players in the world and it's always been part of my psyche, whether as a player or a coach, to test yourself against the best and strive to win.

"They also matter because we want to continue our improvement in the IRB world rankings (Scotland are currently ninth) as that will affect the draw for the Rugby World Cup."

Latest Sport News

Stats Centre