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Rugby player banned for doping claims he ate contaminated biltong

Published 13/05/2016

A rugby union player has been banned for an anti-doping violation which he claims was caused by eating contaminated meat
A rugby union player has been banned for an anti-doping violation which he claims was caused by eating contaminated meat

A rugby union player has been banned for two years by UK Anti-Doping after claiming his positive test for a steroid was due to contaminated meat.

Macclesfield's Sam Broster, formerly an academy player at Wasps and Sale, tested positive for the presence of the anabolic agent clenbuterol in July 2014 after eating biltong, a form of dried, cured meat, common in South Africa.

A statement from UK Anti-Doping read: "Sam Broster has been suspended from all sport, for two years, following an anti-doping rule violation (ADRV).

"Broster argued that the positive finding had been as a result of eating biltong, a South African form of jerky.

"However, an RFU disciplinary panel concluded that there was no basis for reducing the sanction based on no significant fault or negligence."

His ban concludes on August 15, 2016.

UKAD director of operations Pat Myhill reminded athletes they are responsible for any substance in their system and that proving meat contamination is not straightforward.

"The meat that has been contaminated will, in most cases, have been eaten," Myhill said.

"Finding evidence to support this defence can therefore be difficult."

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