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The contenders to replace Stuart Lancaster

Published 11/11/2015

Australia's Michael Cheika, pictured, could be high on the list of candidates to succeed Stuart Lancaster
Australia's Michael Cheika, pictured, could be high on the list of candidates to succeed Stuart Lancaster

Stuart Lancaster paid the price for a dismal World Cup campaign when he stepped down as England head coach on Wednesday.

Here, Press Association Sport studies some of the contenders who could succeed Lancaster in the England hot-seat.


The 48-year-old Australian guided Leinster to their first European Cup triumph in 2009 before moving on to Stade Francais and New South Wales Waratahs. Took over Australia in 2014 with the Wallabies in disarray but revived their fortunes to such an extent they reached the 2015 World Cup final before losing to all-conquering New Zealand.


Succeeded Cheika at Leinster after previously holding assistant coaching jobs in his native New Zealand and France and won back-to-back European Cups in 2011 and 2012. The 50-year-old also won Amlin Challenge Cup and a Pro 12 title before becoming Ireland coach in 2013, where he has since overseen successive Six Nations successes.


The New Zealander would certainly bring a winning mentality having been part of the All Blacks' triumphant World Cup campaigns in 2011 and 2015. The 58-year-old former Northampton Saints boss worked as backs coach under both Graham Henry and Steve Hansen and was interviewed for the England job before Lancaster was appointed. However, Smith said in May this year that he is planning to take a sabbatical in 2016.


A World Cup winner with South Africa in 2007, the 52-year-old has been linked with the England job in the past. Coached the Brumbies and Sharks in Super Rugby as well as acting as technical advisor to Tonga and is currently in charge of French Top 14 side Montpellier. Previously expressed interest about returning to the international arena.


The Australian coach is set to take over South African Super Rugby side the Stormers ahead of the 2016 season but might be tempted by having another crack at international rugby. Jones, 55, masterminded Japan's historic victory over South Africa during a successful World Cup campaign and has worked in England before at Saracens from 2007-09.


The former Springboks boss is probably an outsider as he has done little coaching since his contract as Italy coach expired after the 2011 World Cup in New Zealand. But the 59-year-old might yet be tempted out of semi-retirement in South Africa if the Rugby Football Union came calling.


The former Ireland international has an impressive array of titles behind him at both Ulster and Saracens. The 47-year-old led Ulster to Celtic League glory and has won two Aviva Premiership titles as Saracens' director of rugby, as well as guiding the London club to a European Cup final in 2014.


If the RFU want another Englishman in charge then Yorkshireman Mallinder, 49, might be the best bet. Has worked within the England set-up with the Under-21s and Saxons and proved himself at club level with both Sale Sharks and Northampton Saints, taking the latter to a European Cup final as well as winning domestic silverware.

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