Belfast Telegraph

Thursday 28 August 2014

Sky's Ross Kemp back in Belfast ahead of 'Extreme World' Twelfth of July episode

TV personality Ross Kemp at the outward leg of the north Belfast feeder parade as it passes the Nationalist Ardoyne shops in north Belfast Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye.
TV personality Ross Kemp at the outward leg of the north Belfast feeder parade as it passes the Nationalist Ardoyne shops in north Belfast Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye.
TV personality Ross Kemp at the outward leg of the north Belfast feeder parade as it passes the Nationalist Ardoyne shops in north Belfast Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye.
TV personality Ross Kemp at the outward leg of the north Belfast feeder parade as it passes the Nationalist Ardoyne shops in north Belfast Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye.
TV personality Ross Kemp at the outward leg of the north Belfast feeder parade as it passes the Nationalist Ardoyne shops in north Belfast Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye.
TV personality Ross Kemp at the outward leg of the north Belfast feeder parade as it passes the Nationalist Ardoyne shops in north Belfast Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye.

Ross Kemp will return to Northern Ireland tomorrow for a preview screening of the Belfast episode of his Extreme World series - filmed during the Twelfth of July trouble.

Kemp filmed the episode during the tense Twelfth of July stand-off between cops and loyalist marchers which descended into a full scale riot.

The series highlights some of the world's most dangerous people and places, including sex traffickers in India and Papua New Guinea where he was held at gunpoint by guerillas.

Kemp described his time in Belfast as an ‘eye opener’, as they filmed at an Eleventh Night bonfire off the Shankill Road and a Twelfth parade through Ardoyne.

The former EastEnders actor walked with the feeder parade past the shop fronts before joining the main parade to Barnett's Demesne, passing another flashpoint at the Catholic St Patrick's Church on Donegall Street.

Kemp explained why he came to Belfast for the series: “You're not aware of a lot of what goes on there over in the UK, and a

lot of young people have no idea about the Troubles and the issues that existed in Northern Ireland so there is a generation of people across the UK that has no idea how dangerous a place it was.

“For me it was very much about looking at where we are now, 15 years on from the Good Friday Agreement.”

He added: “I hope that we allowed people with extreme views from both sides of the community to have their say and we spoke to people who have genuine grievances, but I really wanted it to be non-judgemental, completely unbiased.”

The documentary team was filming as serious violence flared and police came under attack.

As part of Kemp's investigation into the divisions regarding parading in Northern Ireland, he spoke to senior police officers, including PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott, and to both bandsmen taking part in loyalist parades and nationalist residents holding protests.

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