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Death simulator: Chinese theme park where volunteers can experience being cremated

Published 05/05/2015

Creators claim their theme park ride is an 'authentic experience of burning'
Creators claim their theme park ride is an 'authentic experience of burning'

Two Chinese philanthropists have created a “death simulator” allowing willing participants to experience cremation.

The Samadhi Game, located in a corner of the Window of the World amusement park in Shenzhen, opened in September 2014 and for roughly £26 simulates players’ deaths by placing them in a coffin and then transporting them to the incinerator.

Once inside, players are then blasted by hot air (up to 40C) and light to create an “authentic experience of burning,” according to its creators, Huange Weiping and Ding Rui.

When the “burning” is over, volunteers see a womb projected on the ceiling and must crawl until they reach a large, white padded area – supposedly representing a womb – where they are “reborn”.

Approximately 50 per cent of Chinese elect for cremation upon their deaths, and the creators told CNN they went to extensive lengths to ensure their simulation was accurate, including visiting a real crematorium and being placed inside.

Much of the start-up costs were covered by Jue.so, China’s version of kickstarter, with more than $65,000 raised. Similar operations have successfully opened in South Korea and Taiwan.

Source: Independent

Independent News Service

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