Belfast Telegraph

UK Website Of The Year

US Navy: Personal data for more than 130,000 sailors stolen

Published 25/11/2016

This US Navy photo obtained October 6, 2016 shows Amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) as it departs Naval Station Mayport in preparation of Hurricane Matthew's arrival onto Florida's eastern coast on October 5, 2016. (File photo AFP/Getty Images)
This US Navy photo obtained October 6, 2016 shows Amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) as it departs Naval Station Mayport in preparation of Hurricane Matthew's arrival onto Florida's eastern coast on October 5, 2016. (File photo AFP/Getty Images)
Undated handout photo issued by the US Navy of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), which will escort the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) when they visit the UK as part of a five-day visit starting on Sunday. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday March 20, 2015. More than 5,000 US sailors are to swamp a UK naval port as their giant aircraft carrier arrives for a five-day visit. The 100,000-tonne ship USS Theodore Roosevelt, which is too big to enter Portsmouth Harbour, will anchor off Stokes Bay, Gosport, Hampshire, for its first port of call in its round-the-world deployment. The ship is substantially larger than the Royal Navy's next generation of carriers which weigh in at 65,000 tonnes. See PA story DEFENCE Roosevelt. Photo credit should read: MC3 Anthony N. Hilkowski/US Navy/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
The US Navy Marching Band walks on 5th Avenue during the 255th New York City St Patrick's Day Parade on March 17, 2016. / AFP PHOTO/AFP/Getty Images
A laser weapon in place on the USS Ponce Office of Naval Research. Image: US Navy

The US Navy is investigating the theft of data belonging to more than 130,000 sailors seeking re-inlistment in the service.

Officials revealed this week that the information was stolen from a contractor’s laptop.

The Navy Times said the military was notified in October by Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services that a computer supporting a Navy contract was “compromised” and that the names and social security numbers of 134,386 current and former sailors were accessed by unknown persons.

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service is in the early stages of investigating the breach, but said it had not found any malicious use of the data yet, the newspaper said.

“The Navy takes this incident extremely seriously - this is a matter of trust for our Sailors,“ Navy personnel boss Vice Adm Robert Burke said in a statement released on Wednesday.

“We are in the early stages of investigating and are working quickly to identify and take care of those affected by this breach."

The paper said an official familiar with the investigation said the personal data came from the Career Waypoints database, known as C-WAY, which sailors use to submit re-enlistment and Navy Occupational Specialty requests. The US Navy has about 430,000 sailors on active duty or in ready reserve.

The Navy will be notifying the affected sailors by phone, email and by mail and it is looking into credit monitoring services for them.

This is at least the second major breach of Navy data linked to its contracting activities with Hewlett Packard, the paper said.

In 2013, the service announced that Iran had penetrated its unclassified Navy and Marine Corps Intranet. In March 2014, the Wall Street Journal reported that the breach was due to a sloppily written contract with Hewlett Packard that did not need P to provide security for some of the Navy’s unclassified databases.

A spokesman for Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services, said: “This event has been reported to the Navy and because this is an ongoing investigation, HPE will not be commenting further out of respect for the privacy of our Navy personnel.”

Independent News Service

Your Comments

COMMENT RULES: Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. The moderator will not enter into debate with individual contributors and the moderator’s decision is final. It is Belfast Telegraph policy to close comments on court cases, tribunals and active legal investigations. We may also close comments on articles which are being targeted for abuse. Problems with commenting? customercare@belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Read More