| 12°C Belfast

Coronavirus: Lack of kegs will mean no draught pints for thirsty punters in Northern Ireland, warns bar boss

Close

Punters enjoy drinks next to Daft Eddy's Bar & Restaurant, Sketrick Island, Killinchy, Co Down

Punters enjoy drinks next to Daft Eddy's Bar & Restaurant, Sketrick Island, Killinchy, Co Down

Liam McBurney/RAZORPIX

Punters enjoy drinks next to Daft Eddy's Bar & Restaurant, Sketrick Island, Killinchy, Co Down

Northern Irish pubs are facing a dry summer with one bar owner predicting there will be no draught takeaway pints until September.

Picturesque pub Daft Eddy's sits by the shore of Strangford Lough and has been a popular place for punters flocking to enjoy fresh food and poured pints in their large outdoor garden area.

The current heatwave encouraged revellers to have the novelty of a lockdown beer garden tipple, but the service was short-lived because the bar quickly ran out of draught alcohol by Saturday night.

They announced on their social media: "Hi folks, takeaway menu operating as usual tomorrow however there will be no draught beer available until further notice.

"Thank you in advance for respecting our alcohol policy. Our garden area is still available for consumption of takeaway food from the premises only. Families and small groups of six or less in accordance with social distancing policy."

Daft Eddy's owner Tamara MacLeod told the Belfast Telegraph: "We didn't have any left. I had managed to get a couple of kegs from other local sources but the breweries have said that they can't put anybody back in to brew beer yet, whatever way they're set up, so it'll be at least three months before there's any draught available.

"They haven't got any got any and they're not brewing at the moment, from the beginning of brewing it will be three months before we see any beer, so I think that's the end of draught beer for most people. The problem is, anybody that has any kegs now, they'll be out of date - so I think it's going to be a dry summer.

"People are enjoying the atmosphere today, a lot of families are down and they'll having soft drinks because we don't really go down the route of promoting massive alcohol consumption anyway.

"Everyone who has come in has said it's nice to have a little bit of normality, where you can talk to someone and even having that pint was really special for them.

"It's been nice and relaxing and that's the way we've wanted it but as a pub we're not wanting to open and generate a load of money through alcohol, as a pub we're happy to provide food and space for people to come out while things aren't quite at the stage where we're back to normal."

Belfast Telegraph