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Omagh one of UK areas to buck trend with increase in jobs

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The number of job postings for health professionals, pharmacists and nurses all increased, but there was also rising demand for workers such as security guards, said REC. (David Jones/PA)

The number of job postings for health professionals, pharmacists and nurses all increased, but there was also rising demand for workers such as security guards, said REC. (David Jones/PA)

PA Archive/PA Images

The number of job postings for health professionals, pharmacists and nurses all increased, but there was also rising demand for workers such as security guards, said REC. (David Jones/PA)

Some parts of the UK, including a Co Tyrone town, have seen a surge in employment despite the overall impact on jobs of the coronavirus crisis.

Job adverts have increased in recent weeks in rural communities in Omagh, South Norfolk and Moray in Scotland, said the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC).

Roofers and security guards are among professions with increased demand, as well as staff for the NHS.

The number of job vacancies in Breckland and South Norfolk in the east of England grew by 8.7% week-on-week between the start and mid-May, while many areas of Scotland and the north-east of England also saw growth, said the report. The largest weekly falls in vacancies were reported to be in the South West and the North West.

The number of job postings for health professionals, pharmacists and nurses all increased, but there was also rising demand for workers such as security guards, said REC.

Chief executive Neil Carberry said: "Health and social care workers being in high demand isn't a surprise, but as more workplaces start to re-open, we are likely to see similar trends emerging for other roles.

"The increase in job adverts for cleaners and security guards could be the first sign of this.

"It's encouraging to see growth in many areas of north-east England, and hopefully other regions will start to follow in the coming weeks."

Belfast Telegraph